Acid Rain Case Study

Acid Rain Case Study - Nic Smith Acid Rain in Eastern...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Nic Smith Acid Rain in Eastern Canada Spring semester 2008 CRN - 1763
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Acid rain is a problem in eastern Canada because many of the water and soil  systems in this region lack natural alkalinity - such as a lime base - and therefore cannot  neutralize acid naturally. Provinces that are part of the Canadian Precambrian Shield,  like Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, are hardest hit because their  water and soil systems cannot fight the damaging consequences of acid rain. In fact,  more than half of Canada consists of susceptible hard rock (i.e., granite) areas that do  not have the capacity to effectively neutralize acid rain. If the water and soil systems  were more alkaline - as in parts of western Canada and southeastern Ontario - they  could neutralize or "buffer" against acid rain naturally. Acid deposition is a general term that includes more than simply acid rain. Acid  deposition primarily results from the transformation of sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and  nitrogen oxides into dry or moist secondary pollutants such as sulphuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ),  ammonium nitrate (NH 4 NO 3 ) and nitric acid (HNO 3 ). The transformation of SO 2  and NOx  to acidic particles and vapors occurs as these pollutants are transported in the  atmosphere over distances of hundreds to thousands of kilometers (Biggs, 2007). Acidic  particles and vapors are deposited via two processes - wet and dry deposition. Wet 
Background image of page 2
deposition is acid rain, the process by which acids with a pH normally below 5.6 are  removed from the atmosphere in rain, snow, sleet or hail (Jones, 2007). Dry deposition  takes place when particles such as fly ash, sulphates, nitrates, and gases (such as SO and NOx), are deposited on, or absorbed onto, surfaces. The gases can then be  converted into acids when they contact water. An acid is a substance with a sour taste  that is characterized chemically by the ability to react with a base to form a salt. Acids  turn blue litmus paper (also called pH paper) red. Strong acids can burn your skin  (Biggs, 2007). A pH scale is used to measure the amount of acid in a liquid-like water. Because  acids release hydrogen ions, the acid content of a solution is based on the  concentration of hydrogen ions and is expressed as "pH." This scale is used to measure  the acidity of rain samples. The smaller the number on the pH scale, the more acidic the  substance is. Rain measuring between 0 and 5 on the pH scale is acidic and therefore  called "acid rain." Small number changes on the pH scale actually mean large changes  in acidity. For example, a change in just one unit from pH 6.0 to pH 5.0 would indicate a 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/27/2008 for the course GEOG 1101 taught by Professor Osterroth during the Spring '08 term at Gainesville State.

Page1 / 20

Acid Rain Case Study - Nic Smith Acid Rain in Eastern...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online