FDMAT108syllabus - Syllabus Course Description This three credit course is rigorous Over 14 weeks you will be expected to devote an average of 9-12

FDMAT108syllabus - Syllabus Course Description This three...

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Syllabus Course Description This three credit course is rigorous. Over 14 weeks, you will be expected to devote an average of 9-12 hours per week in order to complete your assignments. Some lesson may require a little more work, some lessons a little less. Course Overview Math 108 explores contemporary topics such as logic, problem solving, finance math, linear and exponential modeling, and probability and statistical reasoning. It will satisfy the BYU-Idaho Foundations quantitative reasoning requirement but will not serve as a prerequisite for college algebra, trigonometry, or any calculus-based courses. Math 108 is structured around four key units listed below. Unit 1-Quantitative Literacy/Budgeting Unit 2-Critical Thinking/Investments Unit 3-Probability/Debt Management Unit 4-Statistics/Income Taxes Course Outcomes The overarching goal for Mathematical Tools for the Real World is to inspire students to act wisely when faced with quantitative challenges in collegiate coursework, employment, and daily living. Students will be able to . . . 1. Make sound financial decisions through careful budgeting, provident living, taking advantage of the power of compound interest, and prudently managing debt and tax obligations. 2. Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed decisions with confidence. 3. Apply properties of arithmetic and algebra in the use of percentages, unit conversions, and linear and exponential models, to solve practical problems. 4. Use fundamental principles of probability, along with descriptive and inferential statistics, to better scrutinize statistical studies discussed in the media.
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5. Appreciate the aesthetic value of mathematics by reading and writing about enrichment topics such as the golden ratio, mathematics & music, the pigeonhole principle, or the concept of infinity. Learning Model Architecture The course follows a weekly cycle of Prepare, Teach One Another, and Ponder and Prove activities. Students prepare by reading the assigned sections of the text, taking the 6-question Prep Quiz on their reading, and then practicing problem sets in the Homework Manager (a digital tutor and homework management system within I-Learn that follows the textbook rather closely). Guided Practice group discussion boards provide the foundation for Teach One Another activities, but individuals are still held accountable each week with the Guided Practice Assessments. Excel spreadsheet projects offer students very practical applications to ponder and prove their learning. The Excel templates will enable students to build mathematical tools of great significance that they can use in future coursework, career settings, and family life. The course is not an independent study course. The group teaching and learning activities require students to cover material at the same time and at the same pace.
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