Adderall - The Academic Steroid By Anne Flinchum Anthro 528...

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The Academic Steroid By Anne Flinchum Anthro 528
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The Academic Steroid Prescription drugs have been given to patients to treat all types of diseases for years and years. However, prescription drugs have also been a major part of an underground drug culture and are often unsafe to those who are not prescribed to them. One of the most recent prescription drugs that has gained popularity among the young population, especially college students, is Adderall. Adderall is prescribed to patients who suffer mostly from Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). First, it is important to understand the history of prescription drugs and where they fit into the American society. Then, a description of the two disorders Adderall is supposed to treat is also important to understanding the rise of this drug. After an explanation of the two disorders and how Adderall is used to treat them, I will describe Adderall: its side effects for those who are and are not prescribed to it, as well the potential danger that comes with the drug especially as it gains popularity. Doctors prescribe medications for almost every type of illness, and most of these medications help to treat the medical conditions they are designed for if used by responsible doctors and patients. “However, an estimated 48 million people (12 and older) have used prescription drugs for nonmedical reasons in their lifetimes” (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2005). This number represents about 20% of the American population showing the prevalence of abuse of prescription drugs in the U.S. (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2005). Several indicators show that prescription drug abuse is on the rise in the United States. “According to the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an estimated 4.7 million Americans used prescription drugs nonmedically for the first time in 2002—2.5 million used pain relievers, 1.2 million used
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tranquilizers, 761,000 used stimulants, and 225,000 used sedatives” (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2005). These numbers are enough to show that the misuse of certain drugs is a huge societal problem and worth investigating further into. The most commonly misused prescription drugs are in three groups: opioids, central nervous system depressants, and stimulants, and the abuse of these drugs can alter the brain’s activity and lead to addiction (Volkow, M.D., 2005). Opioids, referred to as prescription narcotics, are pain relievers. These include morphine, codeine, oxycodone (i.e. OxyContin, Percocet), and other related drugs. Morphine is often used within the hospital setting for severe pain, but codeine and oxycodones are prescribed for mild pain usually outside of a hospital environment. Opioids “act on the brain and body by attaching to specific proteins called opioids receptors, which are found in the brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract” and ultimately block the perception of pain (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2005). From 1994 to 2002, emergency departments mention that the use of hydrocodone
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Adderall - The Academic Steroid By Anne Flinchum Anthro 528...

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