PhilLecture01

PhilLecture01 - Essay- Part I. Crito's argument must be...

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Unformatted text preview: Essay- Part I. Crito's argument must be valid; if the premises are all t rue the conclusion must be t rue. An argument is valid when there's no way for all of the premises to be t rue while the conclusion is false. A valid argument can still be bad for the premises can be wrong. Part I I- Socrates points out f laws in Cri to's argument but you do not need to say if he agrees with his conclusion. One can agree with all premises and conclusion, but still be invalid. Part I I I- Same as Part I for Socrates. DO NOT: (1) Email it to the wrong TA (2) Fail to email an electronic copy to your TA (3) Fail to attach the paper to your email (4) Put your name on the paper (5) Fail to put your PID number on the paper (6) Make your paper more than 700 words long (7) Make any one section of your paper more than 250 words long (8) Email the paper to your TA later than the beginning of recitation (9) Plagiarize (falsely represent someone else's words as your own) (10) Fail to keep a copy of your email to your TA (with a t ime-stamp on it, in order to prove, if necessary, that you sent it in time) (11) Fail to indicate in a very clear and visible way where one section ends and the next section begins ...
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This note was uploaded on 04/27/2008 for the course PHIL 101 taught by Professor Neta during the Fall '07 term at UNC.

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PhilLecture01 - Essay- Part I. Crito's argument must be...

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