Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde - Dorian Gray Correction – Meghan Jennings...

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Unformatted text preview: Dorian Gray Correction – Meghan Jennings Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray is a timeless narrative about a young man whose sins are not evident on his face but on the canvas of his eponymous portrait. This text occurs at the end of the book after all has transpired: Dorian’s sins have been displayed inadvertently by the portrait, Lord Henry’s “poisonous” thoughts have permeated Dorian’s psyche, Dorian has fully adopted the Dandy and Decadent lifestyle of the time, Dorian has lost two loves, and Basil Howard has been murdered by Dorian. All those acts have led us to this point of narrative text in the book, wherein Dorian experiences some form of introspection and self-revelation. The reader becomes aware of Dorian’s hypocrisy, the effects his vanity is having on him, and, ultimately, the duplicity of Dorian’s character. Dorian’s sins have haunted him for much of the novel but they are still not enough to make the man change his ways. “A new life! That was what he wanted,” “he would be good” because “perhaps if his life became pure, he would be able to expel every sign of passion from the face” of the portrait. It is not for the purpose of being every sign of passion from the face” of the portrait....
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2008 for the course ENWR 110 taught by Professor Weckstein during the Spring '08 term at UVA.

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Oscar Wilde - Dorian Gray Correction – Meghan Jennings...

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