Earthworms - Devin Berry Ms. DiNatale Biology Honors-D June...

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Devin Berry Berry1 Ms. DiNatale Biology Honors-D June 7, 2005 Earthworms The earthworm, also known as Lumbicus terrestris , is a simple animal, Oligochaeta, divided into segments with eight bristle-like hairs called setae on each segment. There are over 3,100 species of the earthworm, which can be identified by features like “long, soft, moist body with annular rings representing body segments; mostly reddish in color, with a few short stiff hairs sprouting from each segment.” (102) They are creatures that dwell in moist soil and eat primarily soil and plant materials. Most Oliochaetes live in moist soil so they do not dry out. They are common to areas with fresh water. They can live everywhere except for the most arid deserts and Antarctica. The aquatic earthworms are generally smaller and have a brighter red color; this has given them the name bloodworms. They can be found the most in grasslands, where an acre can have more than one million worms. Earthworms are very beneficial to humans because during the time period pf war
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Earthworms - Devin Berry Ms. DiNatale Biology Honors-D June...

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