Seasonal Affective Disorder

Seasonal Affective Disorder - Seasonal Affective Disorder...

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Seasonal Affective Disorder MOOD DISORDER In DSM-IV terminology called mood disorder with seasonal pattern. Causes: The most common type of SAD is called winter depression. It usually begins in late fall or early winter and goes away by summer. A less common type of SAD, known as summer depression, usually begins in the late spring or early summer. It goes away by winter. SAD may be related to changes in the amount of daylight during different times of the year. SAD is more common in northern geographic regions. Statistics: As many as half a million people in the United States may have winter depression. Another 10% to 20% may experience mild SAD. SAD is more common in women than in men. Although some children and teenagers get SAD, it usually doesn't start in people younger than 20 years of age. For adults, the risk of SAD decreases as they get older. Symptoms of winter: A change in appetite, especially a craving for sweet or starchy foods Weight gain A heavy feeling in the arms or legs
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Seasonal Affective Disorder - Seasonal Affective Disorder...

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