MLAW100syllabus2016 - MLAW 100 Justice and the Law Fall 2016 Lectures Tu Th 11-11:50 in CCC 1205 Discussion Sections 101 Fridays 9-9:50 in CCC 1200 102

MLAW100syllabus2016 - MLAW 100 Justice and the Law Fall...

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MLAW 100: Justice and the Law Fall 2016 Lectures: Tu, Th 11-11:50 in CCC 1205 Discussion Sections: 101 Fridays 9-9:50 in CCC 1200 102 Fridays 10-10:50 in CCC 1200 103 Fridays 11-11:50 in CCC 1200 104 Fridays 12-12:50 in CCC 1200 Instructor: Karol Sołtan Office: 1140C Tydings Hall Phone: 405-4135 Email: [email protected] Office hours: Tu, Th 4:30-6 PM, and by appointment Graduate Assistant: Brian Sarginger Office: 0129 Cumberland Hall Phone: 314-0392 Email: [email protected] Office hours: Th 2:30-4:00, Fr 1:30-3:00 PM, and by appointment Course description An understanding of justice and law is a responsibility of robust citizenship; it is more than an element of preparation for a legal career. With that in mind, the goal of this course is to introduce students to the multiple ways of thinking about justice, as they have been formulated in legal thought, in philosophy and in various struggles against injustice. This class will examine justice in successive stages. First, we will briefly consider what we might call raw justice or the sense of justice. This sense of justice consists of the inchoate beliefs and often non-rational expressions of moral indignation. Next, we begin to look at thinking about justice that emerges from various struggles for justice. We will return to this topic, in a more systematic way, at the end of the course. But to build up to that final section we will look for signs of an inclination toward justice in the basics of legal reasoning and legal procedure. And we will read about the history of thinking about the [Type here] [Type here] [Type here]
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relationship between law and justice. The class will then investigate how justice is articulated in philosophical theories. We will study most intensively some of the main traditions of thinking about justice, three of which we can roughly associate with the names of their most prominent theorists (Aristotle, Locke and Rawls). The fourth, more global, tradition can be found in the great contemporary project of human rights, centered on the idea of the inviolability of human dignity. Students will examine justice in terms of the five aspects of human dignity: the integrity of the body, equal respect, a material minimum, the sources of life’s meaning, and non-discrimination.
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