Autonomy

Autonomy - Autonomy Autonomy as product of development in...

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Unformatted text preview: Autonomy Autonomy as product of development in other domains Cognitive development facilitates relativism, deductive reasoning, perspective taking. Adolescent begins to see perspectives that differ from those offered by adult caregivers. Biological changes associated with puberty lead to increased interest in sexual interactions. Adolescent begins to look outside the home for intimacy. Social development leads to formation of other intimacies the same age peers. Different forms of autonomy Emotional autonomy: Independence and close personal relationships Behavioral autonomy: making independent decisions about behavior Value autonomy: independent principles about right and wrong, what’s important and what’s not important. Emotional autonomy: Anna Freud’s perspective Anna believed that emotional economy occurred as a reflection of turmoil in the family. Stressful nature of puberty reactivates unresolved ID –ego conflicts. These reawakened conflicts create tension between the adolescent and his /her parents. Adolescents are motivated to separate themselves from conflicts with parents by moving into their peer group and early romantic relationships. This process is called “detachment.”their peer group and early romantic relationships....
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2008 for the course PSYC 338 taught by Professor Lindsey during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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Autonomy - Autonomy Autonomy as product of development in...

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