close reading_remembering babylon

close reading_remembering babylon - Monica Parrillo October...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Monica Parrillo October 24, 2007 Close Reading “She associated her feelings at that moment with the ache in her arms, and with the bowl and its two covers, the one of fat, the other of crochet weighted beads, which had kept her earthbound if she had been inclined to float; but mostly with the sound the bees made, the single vibrant word resounding in their furry heads, the way it gathered and magnified, so that she understood immediately not just what they were, in their individual bee bodies, but why they were; the flow of honey, and its making out of pollens gathered from all the surrounding country – the stringybark blossoms, the banksias, the eggs-and-bacon bushes they grazed on, the swamp water they drank – to become the heavy scoop of gold in the bowl of a spoon, and the transparent thread from which, in its slow falling, it hung and did not fall” (Malouf, 141). Malouf writes this to describe Janet’s excitement and awe over the bees she helps Mrs. Hutchence to take care of. In many ways, this paragraph helps to depict the theme of
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

close reading_remembering babylon - Monica Parrillo October...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online