Hoodfar Veil RLST 12

Hoodfar Veil RLST 12 - Homa Hoodfar The Veil in Their Minds...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Homa Hoodfar The Veil in Their Minds and On Our Heads: Veiling Practices and Muslim Women
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Focus and Goal What are some of the problems we encounter when we examine another group’s social, historical and religious practices from our own perspective. How does our media’s depiction of Muslim women’s veiling practices influence our view of Muslim women and Muslim societies. How are we effected and how do we react to the appearance of veiled Muslim women in our societies.
Background image of page 2
Muslim Women’s Dress and Western  Society In many Western societies, we are bombarded by images of Muslim women in veils. We measure the modernity (and Westerness) of Muslim societies by measuring how the Muslim women are veiled (or unveiled) in a particular Muslim society because it gives us a tool to see what status is accorded to Muslim women in Muslim societies.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hijab The term used by Muslims for “veil” is called a Hijab . Moro Glossary Definition of Hijab: “An Arabic word meaning “covering,” used widely by Muslims across the world to refer to modest women’s dress, which might take a variety of forms. Often interpreted in the West as ‘the veil.’”
Background image of page 4
Various Terms for Hijab (in various  languages) “Hijab” is a generic term. Many other terms are applied to Muslim women’s dress or head covering. Chador (Persian) Monteau (Persian, from French, of the coat worn by many Iranian women) Niqab (Arabic, Urdu, Hindi, Bangla) Burqa (Dari, Urdu, Pashto)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Saudi Arabian Hijab
Background image of page 6
Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi Hijab
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Malaysian Hijab
Background image of page 8
African Hijab
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Iranian Women in Hijab Playing Rugby
Background image of page 10
Western Views of Veil in Muslim  Societies Western societies have always focused on the status of women and their clothing styles in Muslim societies. The author says that every time she mentions to people of European descent that she is from Iran the subject of conversation turns to the issue of Muslim women’s veil. The author is surprised that Westerners always associate the veil with oppression of women in Muslim societies. At times Western women would tell the author that they are glad they were not born in a Muslim society (now that is a backhanded compliment). Sometimes they mention to the author that they are pleased with her living in Western society rather in her “oppressive” native Muslim society.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
by Westerners The author states that she has for years been trying to convince her Western counterparts that their view of women and veiling practices in Muslim societies is based on racism and biases of colonial powers. The author says that she also points out to
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 33

Hoodfar Veil RLST 12 - Homa Hoodfar The Veil in Their Minds...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online