2-27-07

2-27-07 - Term becomes current in late 70s and 80s, in...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Postmodernism in Television Modernity deals with a historical period (industrial revolution, urbanism, enlightenment, secularism); modernism attitude toward modernity Romanticism is rejection/critique of aspects of modernity (against science and logic evident in modernity) Artist not recognized in his time, “a prophet without honor”, orientation to the optimistic future, but before their time Post modernity emerges at the beginning of the Informational Age (the printing press 1453? Mass culture?) Commercialization of ideas and attitudes as department stores come out of late-1880s Relative truth rather than absolute truth- Einstein Heisenburg’s uncertainty theory Context being conceptual to all meaning Post WWII, ‘70s and ‘80s, Informational Age replaces Industrial Age, service economy, emphasis on consumerism Television reflects and reproduces the elements of Postmodernity through its consumer base, etc.
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Term becomes current in late 70s and 80s, in regard to architecture Phillip Johnsons AT&T building, form no longer has to follow function Recycling older forms, ironic distance from itself, has a sense of humor about itself Los Angeles is the quintessential Postmodernist city (Walt Disney Music Hall) No absolute truths, fluidity, multiplicity (the reinvention of self; Bob Dylan) Permeable boundary representation and reality, binary relationships break down and blur High and low culture; past and present; reality and illusion emerge and blur Reality is reduced to representation Radical eclecticism, representing different attitudes and perception brought together in disparity Liberation movements come out of postmodern era...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course FTV 110A taught by Professor Brooks during the Fall '06 term at UCLA.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online