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Aristotle, 2 - Aristotle Life Aristotle and Plato his...

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Aristotle Life Aristotle and Plato, his teacher Stylistic Differences Philosophical Differences The Empiricist and the Rationalist Raphael’s School of Athens Aristotle’s Naturalism and Four Causes Plato’s Forms and Aristotle’s Disagreement Logic: Aristotle’s Three Laws of Thought and the Square of Opposition God the “Unmoved Mover” Aristotle’s “Teleological Ethics” Happiness or Eudamonia as an End Virtue as a Means Contemplation
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Aristotle’s Life . Born in Stageira in northern Greece in 384 BC and was the son of Nicomachus, a physician of the Macedonian king, Amyntas II. . When he was 18 Aristotle went to Athens for purposes of study and became a member of Plato’s Academy at age 18 in 368. He was in constant contact with Plato until the latter’s death in 347 . Over his first 15 years Aristotle worked with a small group of scholars on biological and philosophical topics in Asia Minor and Mitylene . In 342 Aristotle was invited to Macedonia by King Philip, to tutor his son Alexander, then 13 years old. For six years Aristotle tutored the man who ascended the throne at 19 and who would go down in posterity as Alexander the Great. With his pedagogical activity at an end, Aristotle left for a time to Stageira, his native city, which Alexander rebuilt as a payment of debt to his teacher. . In 335 Aristotle returned to Athens, where he founded his own school, the Lyceum. There he taught for over 12 years. . In 323 Alexander the Great died, and the reaction in Greece against Macedonian suzerainty led to a charge of impiety against Aristotle, who had been so closely connected with the leader in his younger days. Aristotle left Athens, lest the Athenians “sin against philosophy a second time,” he said. He went to Chalcis in Euboea, where he lived on an estate of his dead mother until he died in 322.
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Plato and Aristotle Aristotle’s affection for his teacher Soon after Plato’s death, Aristotle praised him as a man “whom bad men have not even the right to praise and who showed in his life and teachings how to be happy and good at the same time.” That said, Aristotle was a powerful, independent and innovative thinker. He was not merely happy to repeat the ideas of his beloved teacher. He modified some of Plato’s ideas and rejected others. In the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle tenderly expressed the necessity of telling the truth, even if it meant dismissing the ideas of Plato, his close friend: It would perhaps be thought to be better, indeed to be our duty for the sake of maintaining the truth even to destroy what touches us closely, especially as we are philosophers or lovers of wisdom; for, while both are dear, piety requires us to honor truth above our friends. (NE 1.6) Stylistic Differences between Plato and Aristotle A series of adjectives captures the differences between the two: Plato is commonly described as idealistic , otherworldly , inspiring , and perfectionist .
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