The Ghost Condition - The Ghost Condition: Imitation versus...

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The Ghost Condition: Imitation versus Emulation in Young Children’s Observational Learning Doreen E. Thompson James Russell Developmental Psychology 2004 Vol 40, p. 882-889 Chapter 5, Learning, Jan 17-19 Laura Bergant Psyc 201-01J Dr Ross, Irene M. Kostiwa
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Introduction Observational learning by children was initially described as the process by which kids imitate another person in order to learn how to achieve a result. There had been debate on whether it was important that a child see a person do something, rather than just see the outcome of an unattended action. A process called stimulus enhancement is where the child doesn’t just recognize the action specifically but knows that an outcome is expected after interaction with some stimulus. The study goal focused on what the differences were between “emulative” learning and imitative learning. Imitative learning is learning by trying to mimic a model’s actions. Emulative learning is recognizing what is needed to be done to acquire an end, and is more creative and intelligent on behalf of the
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The Ghost Condition - The Ghost Condition: Imitation versus...

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