The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club - Patrick Vorce The Breakfast Club...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Patrick Vorce The Breakfast Club November 21, 2007 The movie opens on five high school teenagers having been given an eight hour detention that is to take place over the weekend in the library. Each of the teens has their own personal reasons for being there and not one of them has anything in common. As each one of them arrives, the way in which they socially identify with themselves and their peer groups come to clash with one another, leading to heated exchanges of words and emotions. Over time, however, they come to find that if they are going to be stuck in a room with each other for this extended period of time, they should try to find some common ground. Richard Vernon, the teacher charged with watching these kids for their time in detention, could be considered a hard-ass. Over his career he has come to practically loathe the very kids that he used as a reason to become a teacher in the first place. These reasons are discovered later on in the film, but this is the character that is the catalyst for the teens beginning to warm up to one another. They have found that if there is any common ground on which they find themselves, it would be that they all do not want to be in school on the weekend and especially not with Mr. Vernon.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
After slowly beginning to work out their differences, they end up engaging in slightly devious acts such as escaping the library that has essentially become their prison cell, smoking marijuana in the library, making loud noise, and essentially doing whatever else they feel that they can get away with without Mr. Vernon finding out. After committing these acts, they end up talking and finding that even though they do not socially have a lot in common, they are still able to relate to one-another’s hardships as, generally, they are all in the same situation of peer pressures, cliques, and parent conflict. The dynamic that really seems to draw most of the viewer’s concentration would probably be that between John Bender and Claire. Bender is one of the types of people that would most easily be identified with that of Erikson’s ‘Identity vs. Identity Conflict’ stage. The way in which he conducts himself shows that he has not yet come to fully look within himself yet on answering the question of “who he is” yet. This could be for any number of reasons including that he has simply become caught up in other aspects of his life, namely social obligation and parental conflict. From his description and observation of his behavior, it could be reasonable to assume that his parents were extremely authoritarian in their raising of him. He is a brash, verbally and emotionally abusive character that acts calloused and almost has the emotional equivalent of a drill instructor. Taking all of this into consideration, he has not yet had much time to analyze what he is or could be like. At certain points in the film, he shows that he has the capability of being a caring individual but almost consciously chooses to
Background image of page 2
negate this by abusing the new-found trust of his peers. Once again, this could tie back to how
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 9

The Breakfast Club - Patrick Vorce The Breakfast Club...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online