Journal_2 - Primary Literature The primary literature...

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The primary literature contains new results or new interpretations of old results or both. Independent reviewing plays a major role in the publishing process. The primary literature includes: journal articles conference proceedings technical reports dissertations and theses patents Primary Literature
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Secondary Literature The secondary literature includes: textbooks treatises monographs and "multigraphs" (multiply-authored books) encyclopedias and dictionaries handbooks and data compilations reviews and review serials perspectives bibliographies indexing and abstracting services. All secondary works have the common goal of repackaging and better organizing the new information reported by researchers in the primary literature. New interpretations of old results and speculations may appear in this literature.
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1. An Idea. Is it good or bad? Is it really new? A search of the related literature will answer the questions. 1. Hard Work. Use related literature to help develop methods. Run experiments with great attention to detail. Document the observations and the results. 1. Results. Are they reproducible? Is there independent verification? 1. Interpretation of Results. Discuss with colleagues. Do the results make sense? 1. Presentation of Results at a Scientific Meeting. (optional step) Feedback helps to refine interpretation and suggests new experiments to confirm results. The Journal Publication Process
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6. Write Manuscript. Follow the guidelines and regulations concerning style and organization. These vary with each journal. 7. Send manuscript to Journal Editor. Editor gives a cursory review and sends it to three or four "referees", who have two weeks (but usually take four) to review the manuscript and return a written report. Editor sends a letter and copies of reviews to the author. Editor decides if manuscript is accepted with no, minor, or major revisions, or if it is rejected. Editors may suggest that the rejected manuscript be sent to another journal. 8. Paper is published. Editor sends manuscript to the printer, who sends the author galleys of how the manuscript will look in print. Author checks galleys for accuracy and returns them to the printer. Paper appears in the journal.
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