MUS202 Ch25 - MUS202 Ch25 I The New Order 18151848 o A...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 12 pages.

MUS202 – Ch25 I. The New Order, 1815–1848 o A. French Revolution changed European political landscape 1. peasants and workers became citizens 2. Revolutionary ideas of liberty, equality, brotherhood, national identity spread 3. 1814–15: Congress of Vienna, new map, far fewer states a. interest in national culture b. composers incorporated national traits; cosmopolitan ideal replaced o B. Radical change in the Americas 1. Haiti 1804: first independent state in Latin America, founded by liberated slaves 2. 1810–24 revolutions: independence to most of Latin America 3. 1803–48: United States expanded west and south 4. 1841: French and British provinces united in Canada o C. The decline of aristocratic patronage 1. economic order in Europe changed a. war and inflation impoverished aristocracy b. elimination of over 100 small states; reduced number of courts supporting the arts 2. musicians became free agents: public performance, teaching, commissions, publications 3. opportunities broadened a. old guilds eliminated; opened careers b. conservatories opened in Europe and the Americas c. growing number of music journalists and critics 4. Industrial Revolution mechanized manufacturing a. urban middle class grew in size and influence o D. Middle-class music-making 1. music was important outlet for middle and upper classes a. money and leisure to purchase and play instruments b. expressed aspirations for equality, national freedom 2. music as means of social control a. state-sponsored opera, political messages b. factories organized wind bands; diverted working classes c. music kept women occupied at home o E. The piano 1. innovations in manufacturing, increased availability, lowered cost 2. 1820–50, design improvements a. new pianistic effects, greatly expanded range b. ideal for home music and public concerts 3. women, particularly, played piano a. pianist-composers gave lessons to well-to-do women b. many achieved astonishing fluency c. first half of nineteenth century, quite a few professional women pianists d. musical accomplishment attracted a spouse e. music for two players at one piano, favorite format o F. The market for music and the new idiom 1. amateurs created boom in publishing a. publishers in London, Paris, Leipzig b. 1820s, tens of thousands of pieces listed c. music stores grew rapidly in early 1800s d. consumers demanded constant flood of new music 2. unprecedented influence over music that was produced
MUS202 – Ch25 a. composers wrote songs, piano works, piano duets b. orchestral and chamber transcriptions, only opportunity to hear works 3. early Romantic style a. accessible and appealing to amateur performers b. competition for sales, innovations in harmony c. beautiful melody, striking harmonies within small forms d. evocative titles, national or exotic associations o II. Romanticism o A. “Romantic” as a term 1. term derived from medieval romance a. connoted something distant, legendary, fantastic 2. term applied to literature, then art and music a. focus on the individual, expression of the self

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture