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What do modern theories of voting behaviour suggest about the future of the Conservative Party

What do modern theories of voting behaviour suggest about the future of the Conservative Party

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What do modern theories of voting behaviour suggest about the future  of the Conservative Party? In the 2001 general election, the Labour Party gained 40.7% of the votes cast on a  turnout of just 59.4%. This share of the vote awarded them 62.7% of the seats  available. In turn, the Conservatives, who gained 31.7% of the vote, won only 25.2%  of the seats in the House of Commons. It is estimated that the Labour Party has a  core vote of approximately 34%, while the Conservatives can usually rely on 27%.  Clearly, in order to simply gain a greater percentage of the vote than other party, the  Conservative Party will have to attract many more swing voters, by which I mean  voters who do not have any strong allegiance to a particular party, than any other  party.  First Past the Post, the electoral system used for general elections in the UK, is  biased towards the Labour party for a number of reasons. Firstly, Labour benefit from  having support which is concentrated geographically; simply, they win many small  constituencies where they have strong support. As such, less votes are wasted. They  can also win on lower turnouts. In the 2001 election, Labour needed 25,000 votes per  seat; the Conservatives needed 50,000; the Liberal Democrats needed 90,000. The 
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