Machines will never be as intelligent as humans

Machines will never be as intelligent as humans - Machines...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Machines will never be as intelligent as humans Fifty years ago, one of the first ever computers was made. It was bigger than Toyota people carrier, and took over seven days to perform a calculation. In 2004, you can very easily obtain a computer the size of your palm that will perform a calculation in tiny fractions of a second. The time it has taken to progress from one state of technology to the other has been just fifty years. Imagine what could be done in another fifty, then the fifty after that. In order to answer this question effectively, we must continue to ask ourselves the fundamental questions associated with the topic. Firstly, what is intelligence? Is it the simple act of relaying information, or is it the ability to evaluate and interpret this information? Probably the most noted opponent of intelligent machines is John Searle, a philosophy professor at UC Berkeley. While agreeing that brains and computers can both be considered processors, Searle believes humans try to find...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course PPE PPE taught by Professor None during the Summer '08 term at Oxford University.

Page1 / 2

Machines will never be as intelligent as humans - Machines...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online