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Effect of aircraft-cabin altitude on passenger discomfort

Effect of aircraft-cabin altitude on passenger discomfort -...

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John Campbell 10/20/07 Research Paper Tuesday Biology Lab Effect of aircraft-cabin altitude on passenger discomfort 1
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The effect of aircraft cabin altitude on passenger discomfort is due to something called acute mountain sickness, which will be discussed, in proper detail further on. Acute mountain sickness is known to occur in someone who is not acclimated and then travels to altitudes at which the barometric pressure is equal to that of a commercial air craft during flight. However whether the effects of acute mountain sickness are similar is unknown still. In this research paper we will see what steps have been taken to conquer and answer the question. One method used to conduct this experiment in the New England journal of medicine was to conduct an experiment that would simulate the effects of pressure at altitude more specifically 650, 4000, 6000, 7000, and 8000ft. The experiment took place in a controlled hypobaric-chamber with adult volunteers. The Goal was to figure out not only the effect of barometric pressure equivalent to that of an airplane but to study the arterial oxygen saturation (the amount of dissolved oxygen in the artery) and the occurrence of acute mountain sickness and discomfort. The results for this experiment were as follows. Among the 502 participants who participated the average oxygen saturation decreased when altitude increased with a maximum decrease at 8000ft. Overall 7.4 percent of the participants had symptoms of acute mountain sickness. The frequency did not change much among the varying altitudes in the study. Although the frequency of discomfort that was reported from the participants increases with increasing altitude and decreasing oxygen saturation and was greater then at 7000 and 8000ft then the sum of all the other altitudes combined. The differences became more obvious 3 to 9 hours after exposure to altitude.
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