PhilRel - notes - day23-miracles-hume-craig

PhilRel - notes - day23-miracles-hume-craig - The...

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The theological significance of miracles A way of validating the religious experiences of others.
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The theological significance of miracles A way of validating the religious experiences of others. A way of certifying a divine  revelation.
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David Hume (1711-1776) Essay on Miracles (1748)
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What is a miracle?   According to Hume, a miracle is a  particular exception   to the laws of nature brought about by some  supernatural power. 
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Hume's claims   The evidence for miracles typically consists entirely  in human testimony.
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Hume's claims   The evidence for miracles typically consists entirely  in human testimony. There is a  heavy burden of proof  for miracle  claims.
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Hume's claims   The evidence for miracles typically consists entirely  in human testimony. There is a  heavy burden of proof  for miracle  claims. This burden has never been met by human  testimony.
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Hume's claims   The evidence for miracles typically consists entirely  in human testimony. There is a  heavy burden of proof  for miracle  claims. This burden has never been met by human  testimony.
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The “uniform experience” argument  (pp. 278-9) Since there is a uniform experience  in favor  of any law of  nature, there must be a uniform experience  against  any  supposed violation of that law.   So there is a heavy burden of proof for anyone who thinks a  miracle has take place.
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Low prior probability  Low prior probability  and the burden of proof and the burden of proof uniform experience evidence for evidence against
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The “greater miracle” test  (p. 279)   Don’t believe a miracle story unless it would be an 
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2008 for the course PHIL 1600 taught by Professor Wesleymorriston during the Fall '07 term at Colorado.

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PhilRel - notes - day23-miracles-hume-craig - The...

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