PhilRel - notes - day23-miracles-hume-craig

PhilRel - notes - day23-miracles-hume-craig - The...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The theological significance of miracles A way of validating the religious experiences of others.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The theological significance of miracles A way of validating the religious experiences of others. A way of certifying a divine  revelation.
Image of page 2
David Hume (1711-1776) Essay on Miracles (1748)
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What is a miracle?   According to Hume, a miracle is a  particular exception   to the laws of nature brought about by some  supernatural power. 
Image of page 4
Hume's claims   The evidence for miracles typically consists entirely  in human testimony.
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hume's claims   The evidence for miracles typically consists entirely  in human testimony. There is a  heavy burden of proof  for miracle  claims.
Image of page 6
Hume's claims   The evidence for miracles typically consists entirely  in human testimony. There is a  heavy burden of proof  for miracle  claims. This burden has never been met by human  testimony.
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hume's claims   The evidence for miracles typically consists entirely  in human testimony. There is a  heavy burden of proof  for miracle  claims. This burden has never been met by human  testimony.
Image of page 8
The “uniform experience” argument  (pp. 278-9) Since there is a uniform experience  in favor  of any law of  nature, there must be a uniform experience  against  any  supposed violation of that law.   So there is a heavy burden of proof for anyone who thinks a  miracle has take place.
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Low prior probability  Low prior probability  and the burden of proof and the burden of proof uniform experience evidence for evidence against
Image of page 10
The “greater miracle” test  (p. 279)   Don’t believe a miracle story unless it would be an  even “greater miracle” for the human beings who tells  story to be lying or mistaken.
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern