Ch.5b Lecture

Ch.5b Lecture - Chapter 5b: Learning Operant Conditioning...

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Chapter 5b: Learning What is operant conditioning? Simply put, operant conditioning is a form of learning through consequences . For example… o Does Johnny get dessert if he eats his veggies? o Does Susie lose her TV privileges if she misbehaves? o Will Johnny eat his veggies? Will Susie misbehave? Operant conditioning functions based on rewards and punishments. Thorndike’s Law of Effect The consequences of a behavior determine how likely it is to be repeated. Do X => good consequences => Do X again! (reinforcement) Do Y => bad consequences => Don’t do Y again! (punishment) Skinner’s hungry rat (1930s) When rat presses lever (c), it is rewarded with food (b). What happens then? Why would a rat press a lever in the first place? The operant conditioning paradigm First, some behavior (operant) occurs. That behavior has some consequence. As a result, there is a tendency to repeat that behavior – or not – in the future. lever press food more lever press Behavior (Operant) => Consequence => Conditioned (learned) Response Operant Conditioning: The Elements There are two possible consequences: o reinforcement good consequences always
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course PGS 101 taught by Professor Blan during the Fall '08 term at ASU.

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Ch.5b Lecture - Chapter 5b: Learning Operant Conditioning...

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