Filipino nurses win language discrimination settlement - http\/www.latimes.com\/health\/la-me-english-only-20120918,0,7143293.story#tugs_story_display By

Filipino nurses win language discrimination settlement -...

  • HKU
  • ENGLISH 1034
  • Notes
  • carmen95
  • 5
  • 100% (1) 1 out of 1 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

By Anh Do, Los Angeles Times September 18, 2012 A group of Filipino nurses who claimed they were mocked for their accents and ordered to speak "English only" won a nearly $1- million settlement against a Central California hospital where bosses and co-workers were allegedly urged to eavesdrop on the immigrant workers. The $975,000 settlement, announced Monday by lawyers from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission , is believed to be the 1
largest language discrimination settlement in the U.S. healthcare industry, according to the Asian Pacific American Legal Center. Officials at Delano Regional Medical Center insisted they did nothing wrong and settled the lawsuit only because it made financial sense. Under the terms of the settlement, however, the hospital must conduct anti-discrimination training and hire a monitor to track workplace conduct. The case, filed in 2010, involved 69 immigrants who said they suffered "constant harassment and humiliation when they opened their mouths, or talked with family members on the phone," said Anna Park, a Los Angeles-based attorney for the commission. She said nurses were banned from speaking Tagalog and other dialects in break rooms, hallways and the cafeteria. "They were always telling us, 'Ssshhh. English only. English only. I felt embarrassed, ashamed," said Elnora Cayme, who worked at the hospital for more than 27 years. "I was so angry we were being followed by housekeepers and security guards," she said. "I asked the guard why he did that and he said, 'We were told to watch you and report you.'" During a 2006 mandatory meeting for Filipino staffers, nurses were told they were forbidden from using their native language at "any time in the hospital," said Wilma Lamug, a former 10-year employee.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture