Alexander the Great-Hist 1111

Alexander the Great-Hist 1111 - Kristen Bouck Prof. Boaz...

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Kristen Bouck Prof. Boaz Hist 1111 Alexander the Great
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Alexander the Great, the Macedonian King, is remembered as one of the greatest conquerors in ancient history. His commander and military skills led him to rein over a successful and vast empire. Alexander portrayed strength and power as if he were an invincible god. Alexander was born to Philip the II of Macedon and Olympias. His father conquered much of the Greek peninsula and his mother was a devoted worshiper of the god, Dionysus. He was one that can realize his actions and characteristics, which were a product of his social conditioning of his devoted mother, the responsibility of organizing the empire his father had left behind, and his education as a youth in a society permanently at war. In the year 356 BC, Alexander the Great was born to king Philip of Macedon and his third wife Olympias, an Albanian princess. The day of his birth, his father had conquered a town and won at the Olympics. The soothsayers, ancient prophets, assured the King that Alexander was born to be invincible. Since the day of his birth, greatness was expected from Alexander. Olympias was a woman who belonged to a cult with a love and an obsession with snakes. Despite the anger and disgust of the King, she kept snakes around her at all times. She was also a leader of women worshipping the god, Dionysus. Dionysus was the god of agriculture, fertility of nature, and wine. She worshipped freely and uninhibitedly, often having wild rituals and ceremonies. She possessed great ability and intelligence, but was often known to let her judgment be impaired by her emotions. The relationship she had with Philip was chaotic. She despised her husband as he did her, and she felt the need to control her son. Olympias went as far as to convince Alexander, that Philip was not his father. In detailed journals, Alexander
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revealed that he believed his birth was of the supernatural. The social conditioning of his mother alone greatly affected and influenced the man he became. (Renault 30-33). For instance, Alexander needed to be constantly reassured in his life. Documentation states the he often relied on friendships to feel supported and loved. His mother’s actions caused these insecurities. Her desire to control her son allowed him to be in constant self doubt. His actions as a child were always guided by his mother. She starved her son of the proper affection a mother should give to a child. He was a piece in her game of life. As a free and uninhibited woman, Olympias seldom thought of the
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This essay was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course HIST 1111 taught by Professor Tootle during the Spring '08 term at Georgia State.

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Alexander the Great-Hist 1111 - Kristen Bouck Prof. Boaz...

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