Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic

Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic - Rise and Fall of the...

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Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic
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Outline Plato’s philosophy (conclusion) Virtue and wealth Crito The Near Death Experience of the Soldier Er and the Purpose of Life (teleology!) Rome Cosmopolitan versus Greek Polis law Similarities and Differences between Greek and Roman origins
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Relation of Virtue to Wealth The command of the Oracle at Delphi And I think that no better piece of fortune has ever befallen you in Athens than my service to God. For I spend my whole life in going about and persuading you all to give your first and chiefest care to the perfection of your souls, and not till you have done that to think of your bodies, or your wealth; and telling you that virtue does not come from wealth, but that wealth, and every other good thing which men have, whether in public, or in private, comes from virtue. (Apology)
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Historical Truth of Socrates’ Argument Why did Athens lose the war? Internal division of society continues Rich, slave-owners betray the city to Sparta Alcibiades Athens puts wealth first, rather than virtue This is the illusion of the Cave This is the perspective of Alcibiades > City is divided, falls; Hence, Socrates is the true patriot
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Argument of the Crito 1) Crito’s appeal to Socrates: save yourself (family, friends, etc.) 2) S: We must not do anything wrong. Right? 3) C: What could be wrong with fleeing an unjust sentence? 4) S: Imagine putting this question to the Laws, and having them reply.
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The Laws are your true parents “Are we not, first, your parents? Through us your father took your mother and bagat you. Tell us, have you any fault with those of us that are the laws of marriage? “I have none,” I should reply. “Or have you any fault to find with those of us
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course UGC 111 taught by Professor Bono during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic - Rise and Fall of the...

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