Philosophy of Empire

Philosophy of Empire - Stoicism Philosophy of Empire 1...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Stoicism: Philosophy of Empire
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Polis law and Cosmopolitan Law Alexander: Pharaoh in Egypt, King in Persia No Greek system of law: only Athenian, Corinthian, etc. = Polis law Legacy of Greek empire: cultural (phil, art …) Roman empire is based on Roman law Cosmopolitan law
Background image of page 2
3 Irony of History Only some are free (Hegel) Greece: Accept Principle of enslaving others Romans enslave them Rome Cheap slave-produced grain ruins small farmer = Destruction of free Roman army, fall of Rome
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Compare with US system House elected based on population Democratic Black slaves count 3/5s whites Senate appointed based on equality of states Elite U.S. Constitution as legacy of Roman Law Rationally organized code (Justinian) V. England: no written constitution
Background image of page 4
5 Some are free “Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons.”
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 Lessons of History #1 U.S. imitates Roman system Political: “checks and balances” Excludes women, slaves, and native Americans Legal: written system of law Some are free. > Civil War Shows need to go beyond political limitation of freedom: All are free.
Background image of page 6
7 Main Roman periods (compare with Greek periods) 1) 494-440: “struggle of the orders” > republic: Twelve Tablets (or “Tables”) of the Law, 451 2) 405-264 Internal, Italian wars 3) 264-146 Struggle with dominant external power of Carthage (3 Punic Wars) 4) 134 -71 BCE --Renewed class warfare: 3 Slave wars: 5) Fall of Republic (Emperor Augustus Caesar, 27 BCE - 14 CE)
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 Second wave of class struggles Tiberius Gracchus, about 133 BC: "Wild animals stalking their prey throughout Italy have dens and lairs to spend the night in, but people who fight and die for Italy have nothing but the air and the light. They wander with their children and wives like homeless vagabonds. The warriors fight and die for others' luxury and wealth; they are called the masters of the universe, yet they don't have a single plot of land."
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course UGC 111 taught by Professor Bono during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

Page1 / 35

Philosophy of Empire - Stoicism Philosophy of Empire 1...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online