Duty and Destiny in Hinduism

Duty and Destiny in Hinduism - Duty and Destiny in Hinduism...

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1 Duty and Destiny in Hinduism Karma and Reincarnation
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2 Outline 1) Ethical Dilemma of Kinship Society: India and Greece 2) Argument for immortality 3) Karma, Duty (Dharma), Reincarnation 4) Two approaches to Karma
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3 “Better to live on beggar’s bread With those we love alive, Than taste their blood in rich feasts spread And guiltily survive!”
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4 5. Better to live in this world even on alms than to slay these high-souled Gurus. Slaying these Gurus, I should taste of blood-stained enjoyments even in this world. 6. Nor do I know which for us is better, that we should conquer them or they conquer us, - before us stand the Dhritarashtrians, whom having slain we should not care to live.
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5 Historical context: Greece v. India Compare with Antigone: brother kills brother without apparent regret Greek warrior does not flinch at war between kin. New arena of action: the legal state Kinship duty survives only with woman’s duty to bury the dead. Indian warrior Arjuna is deeply concerned about kinship: his duty is connected with neo-kinship system Legal state of Greece; neo-kinship state of India
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6 Krishna’s Reply 12. It is not true that at any time I was not, nor thou, nor these kings of men; nor is it true that any of us shall ever cease to be hereafter. 13. As the soul passes physically through childhood and youth and age, so it passes on to the changing of the body. The self-composed man does not allow himself to be disturbed and blinded by this.
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7 The transience of matter 14. The material touches, O son of Kunti, giving cold and heat, pleasure and pain, things transient which come and go, these learn to endure, O Bharata. 15. The man whom these do not trouble nor pain O lion-hearted among men, the firm and wise who is equal in pleasure and suffering, makes himself apt for immortality.
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8 Being and Non-being 16. That which really is, cannot go out of
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course UGC 111 taught by Professor Bono during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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Duty and Destiny in Hinduism - Duty and Destiny in Hinduism...

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