EAP HKU Courses

EAP HKU Courses - 1 FACULTY OF ARTS School of Chinese GROUP...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 FACULTY OF ARTS School of Chinese GROUP A: CHINESE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE First Year Courses CHIN1101. A survey of the Chinese language (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) An introduction to the various aspects of the Chinese language: etymology, phonology, lexicology and grammar, with special reference to the cultural context and its developments in the twentieth century. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN1102. An introduction to standard works in classical Chinese literature (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A fundamental study of standard works and selected writings in the classical Chinese literature. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN1103. An introduction to standard works in modern Chinese literature (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A fundamental study of standard works and selected writings in the modern and contemporary Chinese literature. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN1105. History of Chinese literature: a general survey (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims at a study of the general characteristics and the development of Chinese literature from the pre-Qin period to the nineteenth century. This course is suitable for students without A-level Chinese literature attainments. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1106. Poetry and the couplet: composition and appreciation (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to enhance students' ability to appreciate and to write shi and ci poems as well as couplets. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1108. Contrastive phonology of Putonghua and Cantonese (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to help students gain knowledge of the phonological differences and correspondences between Putonghua and Cantonese and thus improve students' language abilities in spoken Chinese. 2 Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1109. An Introduction to Chinese women's literature (3 Credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of Chinese women's literature in its various forms and styles conducted through an examination of specimens taken from the most representative as well as best known writers. Students taking this course are expected to gain a sound knowledge of the development and characteristics of Chinese women's literature from the Han period to contemporary China. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1110. Creative writing I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to foster interest in the great works of modern Chinese literature and to help students develop and sharpen their writing skills. It examines how writers and readers interact with literary works in general and considers how meanings and effects are generated in prose and fiction in particular. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1111. Creative writing II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA Students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A continuation of CHIN1110, this course aims to foster interest in the great works of modern Chinese literature and to help students develop and sharpen their writing skills. It examines how writers and readers interact with literary works in general and considers how meanings and effects are generated in modern poems and free verse in particular. Assessment: 100% coursework. Second and Third Year Courses CHIN2121. Prose up to the nineteenth century (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of Chinese prose in its various forms and styles conducted through an examination of specimens taken from the most representative as well as best known authors. Students taking this course are expected to gain a sound knowledge of the development and characteristics of Chinese prose from the pre-Qin period to the end of the Qing period. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2122. Prose: selected writers (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A detailed study of the prose of one or two of the following: Han Yu, Liu Zongyuan, Ouyang Xiu, Wang Anshi and Su Shi. Students taking this course are expected to demonstrate a sound knowledge of the prose works covered and a general ability to describe and analyse prose styles. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. 3 CHIN2123. Shi poetry up to the nineteenth century (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of Chinese shi poetry in its various forms and styles conducted through an examination of specimens taken from the most representative as well as best known authors. Students taking this course are expected to gain a sound knowledge of the development and characteristics of Chinese shi poetry from earliest times to the nineteenth century. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2124. Shi poetry: selected writers (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A detailed study of the shi poetry of one or two of the following: Cao Zhi, Tao Qian, Xie Lingyun, Wang Wei, Li Bai, Du Fu, Han Yu, Li Shangyin, Su Shi, and Huang Tingjian. Students taking this course are expected to show in the examination a sound knowledge of the shi poetry covered and a general ability to describe and analyse poetic styles. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2125. Ci poetry up to the nineteenth century (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A general survey of the ci poetry from its beginning in the Tang period to the Qing period, with special emphasis on the Song period, which is considered the golden age in the history of this literary genre. Students taking this course are expected to gain a sound knowledge of the development of the ci poetry from the eighth century to the nineteenth century. Its various forms and styles are examined through specimens taken from the most representative as well as best known authors. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2126. Ci poetry: selected writers (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A detailed study of the ci poetry of one or two of the following: Su Shi, Zhou Bangyan, Xin Qiji and Jiang Kui - the Four Great Masters of the ci poetry of the Song period. The course will consider the individual achievements and influences of the poets; their contemporaries will also be discussed. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2127. Classical Chinese fiction (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of classical Chinese fiction through an examination of specimens taken from the most representative compositions. Students taking this course are expected to gain a sound knowledge of the development and characteristics of classical Chinese fiction from the Tang to the Qing period. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2128. Xiqu of the Yuan and Ming periods (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of xiqu of the Yuan and Ming periods through an examination of specimens taken from the most representative compositions. Students taking this course are expected to gain a sound 4 knowledge of the development and characteristics of xiqu of the Yuan and Ming periods. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2129. Modern Chinese literature (1917-1949) I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of the trends of literary thought in China from 1917 to 1949 and how they affected modern Chinese poetry, essays and novels. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2130. Modern Chinese literature (1917-1949) II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of modern Chinese fiction from 1917 to 1949. Attention will be centered on selected works of representative authors. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2131. Contemporary Chinese literature (since 1949) I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of the trends of literary thought in the Mainland since 1949 and how they have affected poetry, essays and novels. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2132. Contemporary Chinese literature (since 1949) II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of Chinese fiction in the Mainland since 1949. Attention will be centered on selected works of representative authors. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2133. Contemporary Chinese literature (since 1949) III (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of Chinese literature in Taiwan since 1949. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2134. Prescribed texts for detailed study I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A close study of one or more of the following, engaging various techniques of scholarship and criticism: (i) Shijing (ii) Chuci (iii) Zhaoming wenxuan Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. 5 CHIN2135. Prescribed texts for detailed study II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A close study of one or both of the following, engaging various techniques of scholarship and criticism: (i) Zuozhuan (ii) Zhuangzi Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2136. Classical Chinese literary criticism (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course includes a general survey of classical Chinese literary criticism with special reference to the Wenxin diaolong. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2138. Chinese etymology (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of the essential features of the Chinese characters, principles underlying their construction, and the process of evolution behind them. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2139. Chinese Phonology (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course includes an introduction to general phonetics, a survey of the history of Chinese phonology, and an introduction to `rhyme books' and `rhyme tables'. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2140. Modern Chinese language I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of the structure, the general characteristics and the development of the modern Chinese language; two or more of the following topics will be covered: (i) Phonology (ii) Lexicology and semantics (iii) Philology Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. CHIN2143. Modern Chinese language II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of the structure, the general characteristics and the development of the modern Chinese language; two or more of the following topics will be covered: (i) Grammar (ii) Rhetoric (iii) Logic Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. 6 CHIN2144. Functional Chinese (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A study of the general characteristics and the development of Functional Chinese with special reference to the use of language in Hong Kong. Students taking this course are expected to acquire sufficient language skills for general communication purposes. Assessment: 100% coursework. GROUP B: CHINESE HISTORY AND CULTURE First Year Courses CHIN1201. Topical studies of Chinese history (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines some of the major topics in Chinese political, social, economic and institutional history. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1202. An introduction to the study of Chinese history (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A foundation course in the development of Chinese history and historiography. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1203. Chinese history of the twentieth century (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A brief survey of the transformation and reformation of China since 1900. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1204. Chinese culture in the twentieth century (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) An introduction to the major cultural changes since 1900. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1205. Chinese history: a general survey (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) An introduction to the Chinese political, social, and economic history from the early times to the present century. The course is especially suitable for students from non-Arts backgrounds. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1206. An introduction to Chinese thought (3 credits) 7 (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A broad overview of the teachings of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism, with a view to introducing students to the foundations of Chinese thought. This course is suitable for both students with or without Arts backgrounds. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1207. Traditional Chinese culture (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) An introduction to the general characteristics of traditional Chinese culture. The course is especially suitable for students from non-Arts backgrounds. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1208. credits) Ruling strategies and governance culture in Chinese history: a general survey (3 (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the ruling methods and the governing strategies employed by rulers in different periods of Chinese history. This course is especially suitable for students from non-Arts backgrounds. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN1209. An introduction to Chinese religions (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) An introduction to the main Chinese religious traditions and practices, and their impacts on the Chinese society and culture. This course is suitable for students with or without Arts background. Assessment: 100% coursework. Second Year and Third Year Courses CHIN2221. History of the Qin and Han Periods (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the dynastic histories of China from the third century B.C. to the third century. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2222. History of the Wei, Jin and the Northern-and-Southern Periods (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the dynastic histories of China from the third century to the sixth century. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2223. History of the Sui and Tang Periods (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the dynastic histories of China from the sixth century to the tenth century. Assessment: 100% coursework. 8 CHIN2224. History of the Song and Yuan Periods (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the dynastic histories of China from the tenth century to the fourteenth century. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2225. History of the Ming Period (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the dynastic history of China from the fourteenth century to the seventeenth century. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2226. History of the Qing Period (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the dynastic history of China from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2231. Religious Daoism and popular religions in China (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course gives an overview of the development of religious Daoism and Chinese popular religions. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2233. History of the Chinese legal system (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the main features and development of the Chinese legal system from the early times to the present. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2234. History of Chinese political institutions (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the main features and the development of Chinese political institutions from the early times to the present. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2235. Sources and methodology (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course intends to provide a thorough training in research methodology related to the study of Chinese history. The ideas of noted ancient and contemporary Chinese historians will be drawn on. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of reference works and information search through internet. Assessment: 100% coursework. 9 CHIN2241. History of Chinese civilization (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with Chinese civilization in general including ethnic cultures and problems in pretwentieth century China. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2243. History of Chinese science and civilization (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to give an in-depth investigation of Chinese scientific thought and culture from the pre-Qin period to the early twentieth century. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2244. History of Guanxue and Sixue (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the development of educational theories and institutions in China. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2245. History of Chinese examination system (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the theories and means of selecting men of talent, as well as the development of the examination system in China. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2246. Historical writings: texts and styles (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A close study of one or more of the following: (i) Shiji. (ii) Hanshu. (iii) Hou Hanshu. (iv) Sanguozhi. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2247. Local histories (fangzhi) and genealogical records (zupu) (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the general characteristics and the compilation problems of local histories (fangzhi) and genealogical records (zupu) in pre-twentieth century China. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2251. Chinese philosophy I: Confucianism (6 credits) 10 (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the major philosophical texts and ideas of the Confucian tradition. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2252. Chinese philosophy II: Daoism (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the major philosophical texts and ideas of the Daoist tradition. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2253. Chinese philosophy III: Buddhism (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the main streams of Indian Buddhist thought and their development in China. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2254. Christianity and Chinese culture (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the history of Christianity in China. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2255. Chinese intellectual history (Part I) (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the main intellectual trends in China from the Qin-Han to the Sui-Tang period. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2256. Chinese intellectual history (Part II) (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the main intellectual trends in China from the Song period to the Qing period. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2257. The development of Confucianism in late imperial China (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the development of Confucianism in China from late fourteenth century to early twentieth century. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2258. The mentality of literati in Ming-Qing transition (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the milieu of the cataclysmic change of Heaven's Mandate in mid-seventeenthcentury China and literati's feelings and responses to the change. Assessment: 100% coursework. 11 CHIN2259. Historical writing and historiography in traditional China (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course explores some important issues of historical writing and historiography in traditional China with reference to the development of historical writing, the organization of historiography institutes, and the influence of emperors on historiography. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2261. Buddha and Bodhisattva worship in Chinese Buddhism (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes) The worship of buddhas and bodhisattvas is a central feature of Mahayana Buddhism, and a pivotal factor in the formation and development of Chinese Buddhism. The course examines the origin of the practice, its transformation in China, and its impact on Chinese religious thought and life. The course aims at providing students with comprehensive knowledge and understanding of a Buddhist practice which has dominated Chinese religious life and shaped the popular image of the Buddhist religion. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2262. Daoist ritual and religious culture in China (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the ritual practices of the Daoist faith and their cultural significance in China from the Medieval times to the present. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2263. Workshop in Chinese biographical studies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the characteristic traits of key historical figures in all classes and professions in Chinese society from the pre-Qin period to the present. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2264. Chinese eroticism (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the rise of eroticism in traditional China. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2265. Childhood in late imperial China (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course provides a historical survey of childhood in late imperial China. It examines the provision of family caring, education and recreational activities for children in the larger context of social and cultural development. Assessment: 100% coursework. 12 CHIN2266. History education and Chinese culture (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the development of history education in China and its relationship with Chinese culture. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2267. Jews in China (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course explores the history and culture of the Jewish People in China. Assessment: 100% coursework. GROUP C: TRANSLATION First Year Courses CHIN1311. Introduction to translation (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is an introduction to the theoretical and technical issues of translation, with guided practice in translating material of common occurrence. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. CHIN1312. Language studies for translation I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This introductory course considers the distinctive characteristics of Chinese and English and aims at highlighting the mechanics of translation as a process of linguistic transfer. Emphasis will be placed on developing in the students a sensitivity towards the particular manners of behaviour of the two languages being reviewed. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. Second and Third Year Courses All courses listed below, if not otherwise specified, may be taken in either the second or the third year. Students opting for the Major are however required to take all the courses in List 1 in the years indicated, unless the Head of School approves otherwise, Second Year: CHIN2311, 2312, 2313, 2314, 2315, 2316 (totalling 21 credits) Third Year: CHIN2317, 2318, 2319, 2320 (totalling 18 credits), and their remaining courses from List 2 in either the Second or the Third Year to make up at least 48 credits in two years. Some of the courses require CHIN2335 or CHIN2336 as a prerequisite. In exceptional cases, these requirements may be waived by the Head of the School. List 1 Courses in List 1 are offered to Translation majors only. Non-majors who wish to take any of the courses should first apply for permission from the Head of School. 13 CHIN2311. Translation criticism I (English-Chinese) (3 credits) In this course, texts in different literary genres (poetry, the essay, the novel, drama) will be selected from English and American literature and discussed alongside their Chinese translations. Students will be trained to develop a critical approach in evaluating the translator's competence and the merits of the selected translations. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. CHIN2312. Translation criticism II (Chinese-English) (3 credits) Selected literary translations in English will be analyzed in terms of the specific problems encountered in the process of translating. In some cases, different translations of the same original text will be examined concurrently. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. CHIN2313. Language studies for translation II (6 credits) This course considers the differences in grammar, semantics and pragmatics between Chinese and English, paying special attention to problems of translating in these areas. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. CHIN2314. Translation in practice I (English-Chinese) (3 credits) This course provides practical training in English-Chinese translation. Materials selected include both the literary and the non-literary. The weekly lectures will be accompanied by written exercises and tutorials. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. CHIN2315. Translation in practice II (Chinese-English) (3 credits) This course contains a critical element as well as a number of exercises in translation from Chinese into English. Texts of different stylistic types will be analysed, and the use of translation strategies for rendering such texts will be explored. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. CHIN2316. Translation theory (3 credits) This course introduces leading theories in translation studies. Through studying on-going debates in the field, students will acquire a theoretical and methodological knowledge indispensable to the procedure and evaluation of translation. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2317. Translation criticism III (English-Chinese) (3 credits) This is a sequel to Translation Criticism I. In this course, texts in different literary genres (poetry, the essay, the novel, drama) will be selected from English and American literature and discussed 14 alongside their Chinese translations. Students will be trained to develop a critical approach in evaluating the translator's competence and the merits of the selected translations. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. CHIN2318. Translation criticism IV (Chinese-English) (3 credits) This is a sequel to Translation Criticism II. Selected literary translations in English will be analyzed in terms of the specific problems encountered in the process of translating. In some cases, different translations of the same original text will be examined concurrently. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. CHIN2319. Language studies for translation III: comparative stylistics (6 credits) This course investigates the resources that lead to effective writing and serviceable translation. The objective is two-fold: to identify the variety of figures of speech such as metaphor, personification, parallelism and hyperbole commonly used in novels, prose, poetry and lyrics; and to consider the effects of these literary devices on the translation between English and Chinese. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. CHIN2320. Long translation (6 credits) The Long Translation project is an important part of the Translation degree. Its commencement is as early as the summer vacation between Years Two and Three when students are expected to find and decide on the texts for their translation. Close study of the chosen texts on the part of the students should occur in the vacation. From the beginning of the Third Year to about the end of March of the graduation year, the actual translation will be done by the student under the supervision of a teacher, in each case assigned by the teachers of Translation. The length of the translation should be about twenty pages; the nature of the writing, as literary or practical as the individual student prefers. Assessment: 100% coursework. List 2 CHIN2331. Choice of words in translation (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is a course specially planned for students who aspire to carve out for themselves a career in administration, publishing, advertising and journalism. Assuming no specific prior knowledge of linguistics, this course takes a new semantic approach to the analysis of different types of word meaning in a text. It addresses some key issues of a functional grammar pertaining to translation studies in Hong Kong. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2332. Translation in Hong Kong society (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The basic aim of this course is to provide students who intend to become professional translators in Hong Kong with an overall view of translation as a communicative activity. The translators' work 15 demands specialised knowledge of the ways translation functions in specific social contexts. The principal concern of this course is the practical information about the various circumstances in which translation serves its purpose as a communicative activity, either in the Government or in the private sector. This course will be assessed on the basis of a written seminar paper presented orally and participation in discussion. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2333. Culture and translation (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course focuses on the cross-cultural dimension of translation. It examines the most complex cultural barriers faced by the translator such as differences in the expression of emotions (for instance - love, anger, fear), codes of behaviour (for instance intimacy, privacy, politeness), values and world views, notions of gender, aesthetic taste, humour and forms of symbolism and metaphor. These issues arising from translation practice will be discussed in light of current theories on culture and translation from multiple disciplines. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2334. Power of speech in written translation (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is a course designed to teach both Translation and non-Translation students specific communication skills required for social interaction in a cosmopolitan city such as Hong Kong. `Good communication behaviour' exhibited in bilingual texts is studied within the general framework of an Interpersonal Rhetoric model. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2335. Introduction to interpretation (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The aim of this course is to introduce to students the different forms of interpreting, i.e., sight translation, consecutive interpreting, and simultaneous interpreting, and to familiarise them with the basic skills and techniques essential for interpreting. Training will be focused on sight translation and consecutive interpreting between English and Chinese. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2336. Interpretation workshop I (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is a continuation of Introduction to Interpretation. Students will be trained in sight translation and consecutive interpreting between English and Chinese on general and more specialised topics. Apart from training in note-taking skills, students will also be introduced to different environments for interpretation and the professional ethics of the interpreter. Prerequisite: CHIN2335. Introduction to interpretation Assessment: 100% coursework. 16 CHIN2337. Journalistic translation (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The primary focus of this course is the linguistic features and stylistic conventions of press material. Texts of various types from the mass media will be examined, and their generic characteristics identified. Students will familiarize themselves in this course with the basic techniques of news reporting and the skills needed to render press material from one language into another. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2338. Translation of promotional material (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Promotional material usually has a unique appeal that lies in the skilful manipulation of rhetorical devices. In this course their linguistic and stylistic characteristics will be studied, with emphasis on how best to translate the original into Chinese or English. Students will be provided with opportunities to examine the creative use of language and to improve their ability through training and regular practice to deal with different kinds of writing for advertizing products and services. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2339. Translation for administration and business (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the role of translation in Hong Kong's public administration procedures, and how it is used by Hong Kong and Chinese business concerns in conducting international business. Students will practise translating papers related to negotiation, administration and the law arising from such contexts, and explore suitable translation techniques in the process. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2340. Film translation workshop (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Film-making today is becoming increasingly international, rendering translation almost indispensable to the industry. Translating films for dubbing and subtitling requires special skills distinct from those outside the field. This course concentrates on such skills, emphasizing audio-visual awareness and cinematic elements such as drama, dialogue, vernacular, and pacing. Critical theories on media and on cultural production and consumption will be introduced. Students learn through group projects, the hands-on translation of feature films, and critiques of film translation. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2341. Translating writings on art (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) In this course students will have the opportunity to practise translating from Chinese to English and vice-versa within the field of art history, art appreciation and art criticism. Writings on Chinese and 17 western art, such as those published by museums and art galleries, will be used as study texts, and translation skills and strategies will be discussed to enable students to build up bilingual vocabulary and linguistic expressions for describing Chinese and western works of art in specific historical, social, cultural and aesthetic contexts. Assessment: 100% coursework. CHIN2342. Interpretation workshop II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is a continuation of Interpretation Workshop I. It aims at providing students with training in consecutive interpreting on specialised topics ranging from political speeches and addresses at meetings on a variety of topics to court proceedings. This course will also provide training in the essential skills and techniques for simultaneous interpreting, including shadowing, rephrasing, memory retention, abstraction and the cultivation of split attention. Prerequisite: CHIN2336. Interpretation Workshop I Assessment: 100% coursework. GROUP D: DISSERTATION Third Year Course CHIN3401. Dissertation (12 credits) A dissertation will be written on a subject approved by the supervisor and the School. This course is only open to students majoring in the School of Chinese. Assessment: 100% coursework. ASSESSMENT Coursework assessment will be based on performance in tutorials and seminars, and on the strength of essays and such other exercises as can be assessed continually. Each course will be examined by a written paper of not more than 2-hour duration except those courses which are assessed by 100% coursework. School of English First Year ENGL1009. Introduction to English studies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to the study of English writing. Students will be introduced to the basic elements of literary analysis and theory in English, and to intellectual issues relevant to the study of the language and its culture. No previous experience of literary studies or linguistics is assumed, but at the end of this introductory course students will have a grasp of the basic concepts and skills needed to make advanced studies in English interesting and enjoyable. The course will also offer guidance and practice in reading, discussion, group work, writing and basic research, including the use of the library and the internet. 18 Assessment will be by 60% coursework and 40% written examination. Coursework assessment marks are based on tutorial participation (10%) and a research essay (50%). The examination (40%) will consist of a two-hour written paper. Second and Third Year Mode of assessment Modes of assessment vary from course to course. Please check the course description for details of how each course is assessed. If staffing arrangements permit, the following second- and third-year courses will be offered: ENGL2002. Language in society (6 credits) This course will provide an introduction to the study of `sociolinguistics', which deals with the relationship between language and society. Topics will vary, but may include the following: multilingualism, language varieties, language planning, language change, English in contact with other languages. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2003. The history of English (6 credits) This is a course about language origins and language change. It investigates the social, political and linguistic reasons that English has developed into the global superpower language of today, and introduces basic tools and methodologies for studying language change in English. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2004. English syntax (6 credits) This course introduces the structure of English by investigating approaches to grammar, models of grammatical analysis, and the grammar of contemporary English. It is interested in the relationship between morphology and syntax, and grammar and linguistics. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2007. Literary linguistics (6 credits) This course uses linguistic techniques to analyse literary texts by examining both the devices that literary authors employ and the literary effects they create in different styles and genres. It employs methods of structural linguistic analysis (looking at the syntax and phonology of texts) as well as socio-historical and pragmatic methods. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2010. English novel I (6 credits) A study of narrative fiction, and of its development in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. 19 ENGL2011. English novel II (6 credits) A study of narrative fiction, and of its development in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2012. Contemporary literary theory (6 credits) In the late 20th century, developments in critical thought had a major impact on literature and criticism. Relations between literary production and language, politics and history were radically reexamined by and through what has become known as `theory'. As a body of thought, theory includes such diverse and conflicting schools and movements as Marxism, poststructuralism, feminism and gender theory, new historicism, postcolonialism and postmodernism. As well as exploring the institution of theory in the academy, students will put theory into practice in readings of selected literary texts. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2022. Women, feminism and writing I (6 credits) This course will explore questions of identity and difference as expressed in women's writing. It will provide a general introduction to feminist literary theory and the on-going range of feminist interventions in literary and cultural studies. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2027. Text and discourse in contemporary English (6 credits) This course will examine how writers exploit the resources of English for creative and communicational purposes in contemporary writing in different genres. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2030. World Englishes (6 credits) This course will survey the English language throughout the world, with reference to the use of English in Britain, Asia, and Hong Kong. This course will focus particularly on the development of `new Englishes' in Asia and Hong Kong. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2031. The semantics and pragmatics of English (6 credits) This course introduces the study of meaning in the English language. We will examine semantic meanings meanings encoded in the language system itself and also pragmatic meanings meanings inferred from the communicative context of language use. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2033. English novel III (6 credits) A study of narrative fiction, and of its developments in the twentieth century. 20 Assessment will be by 60% coursework, 40% examination. ENGL2035. Reading poetry (6 credits) An advanced reading course for students interested in specializing in poetry. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2037. Science fiction (6 credits) This is a survey of the genre of science fiction from late 19th century literature by H.G. Wells through to recent movies such as Blade Runner and The Matrix. As well as formal and historical study of the SF genre, the course will be concerned with fictional presentations of scientific possibility and the moral and political strategies that underlie representations of utopia and dystopia. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2039. Language and gender (6 credits) This course examines the relationship between cultural attitudes and language, how gender socialization is reflected in the structure and use of language, and the effectiveness of political and social forces in "legislated" linguistic change. Stereotypes and biases about the sexes, standard and vernacular norms will also be examined in the course. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2040. Asian American literature (6 credits) This course presents a survey of Asian American literature through literary texts from Asian American communities, including Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Filipino, and Southeast Asian Americans. We will touch on major themes explored in these texts, such as concepts of dislocation and relocation as well as finding and/or inventing a usable past. The readings span a range of genres and historical periods. The course will attempt to contextualize these texts both historically and culturally. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2045. Travel writing (6 credits) This is a survey of European travel writing as a literary genre from the medieval period to the present day. The writings of travelers and explorers such as Marco Polo, Christopher Columbus and James Cook are examined, as well as those of modern travel writers such as Freya Stark, Graham Greene, D.H. Lawrence, Paul Theroux and Jan Morris. European travel writing is explored formally and thematically with the aim of introducing students to its many strategies and subtexts, and especially its historical role in articulating `otherness' for the European imagination. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2046. English words (6 credits) This course explores the structure, meaning, history, and usage of English words from a linguistic point of view. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. 21 ENGL2047. English discourse structures and strategies (6 credits) This course will provide an introduction to the analysis of English discourse from a linguistic perspective. Students will learn rhetorical methodologies and examine their effects on readers and listeners. Units include: spoken and written English discourse, global organization and cohesion, discourse markers, information structure, narrative, and non-verbal structures and strategies. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2048. Language and jargon (6 credits) This course focuses on specialized sub-group languages or jargons, and uses texts from a range of historical period to examine the socio-cultural dynamics behind the creation, maintenance and disappearance of such jargons. Particular attention will be paid to the history of criminal jargon, prison jargon and other speech varieties associated with other marginal or criminalized sub-groups (e.g. drug addicts, "tramps", etc.), as well as to the history of the study of such jargons and the inclusion of jargon and slang items in mainstream dictionaries. Students will read texts from different periods in the history of English, as well as considering the role of jargons in modern societies such as the United States, Britain and Hong Kong, as well as in "cyber-space". Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2049. The history of English: sociolinguistic perspectives (6 credits) This course will have a specific focus on the history of the English language from a sociolinguistic perspective. The course will discuss issues related to language contact, standardisation, variation, and varieties of English. Particular reference will be made to the role of attitudes and ideologies in the development of the language. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2050. English corpus linguistics (6 credits) Corpus linguistics is a rapidly-developing methodology in the study of language. It exploits the power of modern computer technology to manipulate and analyse large collections of naturally-occurring language ("corpora"). This course will introduce students to the use of computers and computerized corpora as tools for exploring the English language. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2054. Race, language and identity (6 credits) This course looks at different notions of identity and the origins of modern understandings of ethnicity. It focusses on the contribution made by ideas about language to theories of group identity, including nationalism, and the tensions between linguistic, racial, religious and cultural notions of identity. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2055. American Gothic: Haunted Homes (6 credits) In this course we will examine the gothic as an important genre in American literature and trace its tradition across two centuries. As a response to dominant ideas and conventions that shaped American literature, the gothic offers us a challenging perspective on the mainstream as well as on 22 what it excludes. Beginning with some classic examples of the genre, we will seek to identify the elements and the rhetoric of the gothic text in order to appreciate the specific use that later writers have made of the gothic form. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2057. Text and image (6 credits) This interdisciplinary course explores relations between literature and various forms of image-based representation. It begins with `painterly' descriptions in novels and poetry, and common strands in art and literary criticism, and proceeds to discussion of relations between film and literature, such as the presence of cinematographic form in modern literature. In the concluding module, we consider the shift in emphasis from text-based to image-based culture and its impact on postmodern society. Course material consists of critical essays, and examples from literature, the pictorial arts and the moving image. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2058. Narrative prose: a linguistic investigation (6 credits) This course examines the linguistic techniques by which narrative writing in English works. With a focus on literary texts, the course will consider topics such as co-reference and cohesion, syntactic style and patterning, place and time deixis, the handling of conversation, modality and point of view, and more generally, the linguistics of `realism', and the linguistic basis of irony. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2059. American drama and American film (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will introduce American drama and American film: developing stories of America in performance. We will emphasize performance, as well as analysis: casting, acting, directing, staging, special effects, and audience. As centers of industry, education, and culture moved across the country, form and innovation shifted accordingly. Looking at competing histories and narrative strategies, we will see how American plays and American films participate separately and together in remaking American myths and literary patterns, while assimilating and rejecting inherited models. Considerations of American English, silence, the loner's staged resistances, and audience participation will be included. We will read plays such as: Eugene O'Neill's The Hairy Ape, Tennessee Williams's The Glass Menagerie, Arthur Miller's All My Sons, Sam Shepard's True West, and Ishmael Reed's Hubba City. We will see films such as Casablanca, High Noon, The Way We Were, Hair, and Boyz N the Hood. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2062. The history of Western linguistics (6 credits) This course will trace the history of ideas about language and its relationship to the mind and the world, from ancient to modern times. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2064. Advanced English syntax (6 credits) 23 (Prerequisite: ENGL2004 English syntax or EDUC2201 or LING2050) Building on from "ENGL2004 English syntax" this course will introduce students to two burgeoning paradigms in present-day linguistics: construction grammar and grammaticalization theory. The first of these is a general semantico-syntactic language theory; the second a (historical) linguistic discipline that focuses on how grammatical constructions come into being. The compatibility and complementarity of both approaches will be looked at through a detailed case study of English clausal complement constructions. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2065. Meaning and metaphor (6 credits) This course will introduce students to a number of questions about linguistic meaning and examine various definitions of metaphor. Among the questions considered are: What role does metaphor play in human language? In what way (if at all) do languages create or embody particular culturallyspecific world-views? Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2066. Orientalism and linguistics (6 credits) This course studies linguistics as a branch of what Edward Said has termed `Orientalism', i.e. western models of Asian language, literature, culture and society created within European colonialism. It looks at the ways western linguists of the 19th and 20th century have `imagined' or categorized Asian languages, relating those categories to debates within western linguistics. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2069. Form and meaning (6 credits) An investigation into the relationship between English structure and meaning (semantics and pragmatics), considering how meanings are encoded and inferred. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2074. Postcolonial readings (6 credits) This course examines important works of literature in English from perspectives opened up by recent debates on `nation', `narration', and `hybridity'. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2075. The idea of China (6 credits) An examination of English representations and interpretations of China in a selection of writings from the 18th century to the early 20th century. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2076. Romanticism (6 credits) The course studies the Romantic era, and traces its history through a selection of its main texts. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. 24 ENGL2078. The novel today (6 credits) This course examines developments in the novel by studying a representative sample of recently published fiction in English. Innovations in narrative technique, such as metafiction and postmodern poetics, will be one strand of enquiry. Thematic strands will depend on the novels selected for study but are likely to include, gender, representation, globalism, postmodernism, race and ethnicity, and identity. Assessment will be by 60% coursework, 40% examination. ENGL2079. Shakespeare (6 credits) This course will explore some of the themes and form of Shakespeare's drama, and will consider how his work has been interpreted in modern times. Assessment will be by 60% coursework, 40% examination. ENGL2080. Women, feminism and writing II (6 credits) This course will explore the often difficult relationship between women and what has been traditionally known as the `feminine sphere'. Women have commonly been associated with the feminine sphere of love, marriage and family and this course will consider how modernity and feminism have challenged and disrupted this assumption. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2082. Modern literary criticism (6 credits) This course introduces students to a selection of major texts in literary criticism from the early 19th century to the 1960s. It examines principal critical concepts and methodological principles formulated in these texts and traces the developments of critical thought within this period. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2084. Modernism and short fiction (6 credits) This course studies the re-invention of traditional forms of writing in the modernist revolution that ushered in the twentieth century in Europe and beyond. Concentrating on short fiction, it investigates how modernist writers found ways to `make it new'. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2087. Persuasion (6 credits) This is a course about rhetoric, in which students will explore ways in which language can be used to convey, reinforce or change ideas. The objective is to help students to understand, analyse, and develop the arts of discourse in English, and the critical skills on which they depend. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2089. Making Americans: Literature as ritual and renewal (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening 25 purposes.) This course will be an introduction to American literature primarily through fictional and non-fictional accounts of exemplary lives. Our focus will be on how successive generations of immigrants and settlers have constructed and transformed a vision of "America" as process and promise. The course aims to introduce students to the diversity of writing that constitutes American literature, to guide them in the development of critical reading and writing skills and to provide them with opportunities to build, present and respond to arguments about the texts and topics under discussion. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2090. The moving production of America: reading recent films (6 credits) In this course we will look at recent American movies and examine the ways in which they generate visions of American reality. Our inquiries will be guided by three focuses: 1) looking at movies, we will ask where they locate American life and how they represent it; 2) looking through movies, we will ask how they feel the pulse of an American public, what assumptions they make about their audience and how they seek to move it; 3) looking into movies, we will try to understand how they review and reconfigure the world of American movies itself. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2091. Comedy and Asian American drama (6 credits) In this course we will look at Asian-American drama in two ways: through humor and an abbreviated history of drama in America. Topics to be addressed include Asian-American humor, oral and written developments of "character" in America, American tall tales, questions of youth and tradition, American story-telling on stage. The course involves students in several ways: as readers, as writers, as voluntary participants in short stage pieces, as collectors of data on humor in popular and literary settings. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2092. Postcolonial English (6 credits) For many creative writers - writers of poetry, fiction, drama - from outside the Anglo-American world, English has a complex history and often an uneasy relationship, with native languages. The decision, or the choice, to write and publish in English, is an issue they have reflected upon and debated, nationally and internationally, with other writers. Such reflections and debates constitute one of the dynamic contours of "Global English" as a discourse. Critical questions often raised in the debate concern the English language as the bearer of cultures. They include the changing roles of English as a colonial or postcolonial language, as the language of the unitary or pluralistic nations, as a dominant or minority language, as the language of `English literature' or `Literature in English'. In this course, students will be introduced to these questions through discussions of essays by writers who have considerable practical experience using English as the language of creativity, and who are active contributors to debates about English in their own locations. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2093. Literary islands: English poetry and prose from the South Pacific and the Caribbean (6 credits) In this course we will read and discuss literary texts mainly poems and short stories from two cultural regions that received the English language as colonial cargo between the 17th and 19th centuries. Looking at the different histories of the insular cultures of the South Pacific and the Caribbean, we 26 will consider how these histories have shaped the emergence of Anglophone literatures, and how these literatures in turn challenge our expectations of English literature. We will pay special attention to the forms of communication these texts represent and establish as they construct a sense of place, and parallels will perhaps be drawn to the case of Hong Kong. Topics: history and politics of English in the South Pacific and the Caribbean, the emergence of English-language literatures and the development of indigenous traditions, the relationship between writing and place, distance and insularity, the relationship between literature and vernacular culture (conversation, song, storytelling, oratory) Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2094. Cultural approaches to second language varieties of English (6 credits) In this course, we will look at second language varieties of English and what they can tell us about the cultural background of their speakers. After an introduction to the relation of language and culture in general (Linguistic Relativity Principle), and some modern adaptations of this principle with respect to the role of English in the world, the students will be acquainted with specific methodologies from cognitive linguistics/cognitive anthropology and computer corpus analysis, which allow them to systematically analyze language from a cultural perspective. The students are required to conduct independent research, utilizing these methods of investigation. Some prior knowledge about varieties of English (World Englishes) is of help, but is no requirement. Due to the restricted number of workstations in the computer lab, not more than 40 students can be admitted to this class. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2095. The East: Asia in English writing (6 credits) Interpretations of the Orient in modern western writings, from the colonial to the postcolonial period. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2096. Creative Writing (12 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) In this year-long seminar, students will study the craft of writing. As developing writers, they will find their attention directed toward elements of design in language. Practice will be offered in training the eye and ear for recognizing, developing, and editing elements of voice. In the first semester, stories and poems will be the focus. The second term will introduce the writing of plays, along with editorial work on the journal Yuan Yang. Continuous practice is emphasized, as is reading. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2097. Imagining Hong Kong (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) In this course, students will read selections of fiction, poetry, essays, and journalism from earlier moments in the twentieth century to post-1997. Questions of modernity, urbanization and the urban subject, and cross-cultural identities will be discussed from perspectives opened up by postcolonial theories, and with reference to historical change both locally and in Hong Kong's geopolitical situation in the last fifty years. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. 27 ENGL2098. Call and response: Southeast Asian literature written in English (6 credits) This course considers a range of South East Asian texts by focusing on authors from India, Malaysia and Singapore. Discussions will centre on issues raised by the literature, such as: the effects of colonialism, post-colonialism and neo-colonialism over the last century, the construction of "nation" and the problematic relationship between individual, religious, cultural and national identities, the effects of exile and peripheral existence on identity, the role of the author as myth-maker and canonical revisionist, regional forms of feminism, and the consequences of globalization and transculturalism. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2099. Language, identity, and Asian Americans (6 credits) This interdisciplinary course explores the relationship between language and identity with a special focus on Asian Americans and linguistic issues relevant to Asian Americans. With particular attention to the linguistic practices of Asian Americans, we will examine such questions as: What attitudes are associated with being bilingual? Do Asian Americans speak with an accent? Does accent determine whether Asian Americans are perceived of as `white'? Do any Asian Americans speak `black'? We will also explore the position of Asian Americans in social, political, and educational discourses in order to understand how an `Asian American' identity can be constructed through language practices. Although the course focuses on Asian American identities and experiences, students will be encouraged to discuss issues of social identity and language in general. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2100. Language and social interaction (6 credits) This course provides an introduction to the analysis of social interaction (in English) and explores the relationships between macro- and micro-level approaches to the study of language and social interaction. We will examine how language both reflects and contributes to the organization of social order by close analyses of naturally occurring interactions. Students will learn the fundamentals of data collection and transcription, explore ways of interpreting talk as a form of social action, and conduct original research on the analysis of data that they will collect for the course. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2101. Culture and society (6 credits) What is culture? What is Cultural Studies? Why should we consider cultural formations in literary studies? Focusing on the cultural critic Raymond Williams (1921 1988), this course introduces students to British Cultural Studies and discusses the importance of Cultural Studies in the changing landscape of literary studies. More specifically, we will discuss the historical transformation of literary studies from a text-based practice into a broad critical engagement with human experience and examine the critical energies within literary studies that have brought about such a transformation. Students in this course will read a selection of seminal writings by Williams with close reference to the literary examples he cites from prose fiction, poetry and drama. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2102. Theories of beauty (6 credits) 28 The idea and experience of the beautiful are inseparable from literary art. This course provides an introduction to literary aesthetics. Focusing on British tradition of aesthetics, we will examine the disciplinary establishment of aesthetics as a historical formation in relation to literary, cultural, and intellectual modernity and discuss developments of major aesthetic concepts in history. There will be weekly lectures and workshops, in which we will read closely major aesthetic texts and discuss important debates in aesthetics with reference to our studies of literature and our everyday experience of the beautiful. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2103. Language and new media (6 credits) Language is strongly influenced by the medium through which it is presented. When the medium itself is in wide use, norms emerge which determine not only the form that language can take, but also the pragmatic effects of any language use that either exploits or deviates from these norms. The nature of public language--that is, language generated by or for the public at large through various media--in turn influences public discourse (i.e., what is being talked about large-scale, and how it is talked about). When the nature of the medium is expressly exploited linguistically, then this change can achieve overwhelming and widespread effects. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2104. Language in the USA (6 credits) This course addresses the problems (theoretical and practical) inherent in defining a variety of English as `American'. Issues treated include the history of American English; dialectology; sociolinguistics; Black English; and the politics of American English. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2105. Contemporary North American novelists (6 credits) In this course we will explore developments and issues in contemporary North American fiction by focusing on the work of selected novelists active in the USA and Canada (the adjective `contemporary' loosely locating this activity within the lifetime of the lecturer). The specific works to be examined and discussed will vary from year to year but we will typically read closely three or four novels by one (or two) novelist(s) each year. This will allow us to address questions regarding particular writers' evolving craft and concerns, as well as to situate their work in the context of recent currents in North American literature. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2106. Childhood, reading and literature in the nineteenth century (6 credits) This course looks at ideas of childhood and reading in the nineteenth century through a detailed study of a number of representative texts. This course has both a historical and a practical aim. It studies a selection of literary texts from the 19th century, which can be broadly classified as `children's literature'. Children's literature has become a flourishing field of academic enquiry, and although this course touches upon theoretical considerations about the genre, it is more interested in following the idea of childhood through the nineteenth century through a number of literary representations. The books created for children, whether as teaching tools or engrossing stories reflect both the ideas about childhood in circulation at any given moment, and the experience of being a child. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. 29 ENGL2107. Literature, culture and gender at the Fin de Sicle (6 credits) This course locates the literature of the 1890s within the cultural and social context of the late nineteenth century through a detailed study of contemporary documents and pictorial material alongside the core texts. Some of the themes discussed in this context include: decadence and degeneration; sexual anarchy, new women and decadent men; the fin de sicle subject and the birth of psychoanalysis; civilisation and its discontents; old endings and new beginnings. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2108. Shakespeare's language (6 credits) This course focuses on diverse aspects of the language of Shakespeare's plays and poetry. It looks at Shakespeare's language in the context of the history of the English language and introduces its key grammatical and lexical features. Specific attention will be paid to linguistic variation relating to social class, occupation group and gender; the use of metaphor; ambiguity and punning; terms of address; rhetorical structure. Shakespeare's long term impact on the English language will be considered, along with an analysis of the place of his work in national and nationalist histories of the English language. Assessment will be by 100% coursework ENGL2109. Writing diaspora (6 credits) This course examines problems and issues in the literature and film produced by diasporic and migrant communities. Structured around several modules in which various texts are used to investigate such issues as identity and subjectivity, displacement, nostalgia, memory, secondgeneration conflicts, "passing" and diasporic transformation. Elaborates on the problematic nature of these issues and explains their significance in global diasporas. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2110. Writing back (6 credits) `Writing Back: Post-Colonial Re-writings of the Canon' is a course that examines the strategy employed by some post-colonial literary texts of re-writing `canonical' literary texts to expose their literary, cultural and ideological assumptions. The course investigates the ways in which such texts resist the imposed cultural assumptions of English literature. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2111. Seeing Australia (6 credits) `Seeing Australia' is a course that examines the way Australia has been `seen' over the last two centuries, in art and literature. In investigating the way Australia has historically been depicted and understood, students will discover how Australia has come to exist in the mind of its own people and those from other countries. Australia is therefore seen as the subject of many culturally disparate `ways of seeing'. We begin the process by analysing the concept of `seeing' itself. `Seeing' stands for many different ways of knowing and representing and these will be explored in a range of texts: written texts in poetic and narrative form, and visual texts of various kinds. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. 30 ENGL2112. An introduction to the history of English (6 credits) This introductory seminar will acquaint students with the main historical periods of the English language (Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English) and theoretical and methodological problems and approaches in studying these varieties. Through the use of various media apart from academic literature (video, audio presentations, online sources, computer corpora), the seminar will offer students various modes of learning about the history of English, language change, and linguistic theory. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2113. Conrad and others (6 credits) Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) was a Pole who wrote fiction in English, after a career as a sailor which took him round a world largely dominated by expanding and competing European empires. He often focuses his stories on cross-cultural encounters. This course sets Conrad's work in its cultural and historical context, and examines the way his fiction represents `alterity', our sense of the otherness of other people, which also helps us define the self. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2115. Theories of Language Acquisition I (6 credits) (NOT to be taken with: EDUC2203 First and second language acquisition, LING2036 Child language) This course offers an introduction to the central themes in language acquisition, covering first language acquisition, second/foreign language acquisition and bilingualism. Students are expected to gain from the course a broad understanding of how children acquire their first language, how second language learners learn a new language, and the potential differences in processing and outcome. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2116. Theories of Language Acquisition II (6 credits) (Prerequisite: ENGL2115. Theories of Language Acquisition I or EDUC2203 or LING2036) This advanced course will deal with some of the critical issues addressed in Theories of Language Acquisition I in greater depth. It covers theoretical perspectives ranging from innateness, empiricism, to emergentism. We will study a survey of research on language acquisition and examine observational and experimental empirical data from various schools. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. ENGL2117. English phonology and morphology (6 credits) This course provides a comprehensive study of the sounds (phonemes) and structure (morphemes) of English words. Students will examine the phonemes of English as they occur separately and in context and the processes involved in producing those sounds. The course includes problems that Cantonese speakers might have in mastering English phonemes (and why) and ways in which those problems can be overcome. Students will also develop an understanding of the building blocks of English words and how morphemes differ from syllables. In learning the various ways in which English words are formed, each student will be able to increase his/her own lexicon and develop an understanding of how and why words are constantly being added to or deleted from the English language and who is generally responsible for those changes. Assessment will be by 100% coursework. 31 Courses available for third year students only ENGL3032. Advanced topics in English studies (12 credits) This is an advanced tutorial course which allows the student to follow an in-depth programme of research under the guidance of a member of staff. There are no lectures, and the course aims to encourage the student to pursue independent research. Students should choose a topic which falls within the broad area of the English Department's curriculum. This should be done in consultation with a member of staff. The student and staff member should agree a programme of study, and the student can opt either to produce a single extended piece of work (a dissertation) or four essays on related topics. The student should have regular meetings with the tutor. Admission to this course is conditional on good academic performance, and the subject matter and scope of the course requires the approval of the department. Assessment will be by dissertation or four written essays (100% coursework). ENGL3033. Research seminar in English studies (6 credits) This course is designed for students who wish to pursue advanced work in a specialized area of English Studies. This course is open to third year students only. Students are normally expected to have prior knowledge in the subject area and should consult individual seminar co-ordinators before registering for the course. There will be no formal lectures. Students will meet regularly with their tutor for guidance but they will also be required to work independently. They will be expected to take the initiative in locating and evaluating primary and secondary sources research materials. Assessment will be by written essay or project (100% coursework). ENGL3034. Research seminar in English literary studies (6 credits) This course is designed for students who wish to pursue advanced work in the study of literatures in English. This course is open to third year students only. Students are normally expected to have prior knowledge in the subject area and should consult individual seminar co-ordinators before registering for the course. There will be no formal lectures. Students will meet regularly with their tutor for guidance but they will also be required to work independently. They will be expected to take the initiative in locating and evaluating primary and secondary sources research materials. Assessment will be by written essay or project (100% coursework). ENGL3035. Research seminar in literary theory (6 credits) This course is designed for students who wish to pursue advanced work in the study of literary theory and literary criticism. This course is open to third year students only. Students are normally expected to have prior knowledge in the subject area and should consult individual seminar co-ordinators before registering for the course. There will be no formal lectures. Students will meet regularly with their tutor for guidance but they will also be required to work independently. They will be expected to take the initiative in locating and evaluating primary and secondary sources research materials. Assessment will be by written essay or project (100% coursework). ENGL3036. Research seminar in English linguistics (6 credits) This course is designed for students who wish to pursue advanced work in the study of English language and linguistics. This course is open to third year students only. Students are normally 32 expected to have prior knowledge in the subject area and should consult individual seminar coordinators before registering for the course. There will be no formal lectures. Students will meet regularly with their tutor for guidance but they will also be required to work independently. They will be expected to take the initiative in locating and evaluating primary and secondary sources research materials. Assessment will be by written essay or project (100% coursework). ENGL3037. Research seminar in language & society (6 credits) This course is designed for students who wish to pursue advanced work in the study of language and society. This course is open to third year students only. Students are normally expected to have prior knowledge in the subject area and should consult individual seminar co-ordinators before registering for the course. There will be no formal lectures. Students will meet regularly with their tutor for guidance but they will also be required to work independently. They will be expected to take the initiative in locating and evaluating primary and secondary sources research materials. Assessment will be by written essay or project (100% coursework). School of Humanities courses Comparative Literature First-year Courses The department's first year programme consists of courses introducing the students to cross-cultural and trans-disciplinary perspectives on comparative literary, cultural and visual studies. There will normally be at least one 6-credit course offered in each semester. CLIT1001. Introduction to comparative literary and cultural studies I: Film studies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course will introduce students to the techniques and practice of film through the study of a historically and culturally varied range of cinematic productions. Both international and local cinema will be studied. The aim of the course is to enable students to read the language of film. CLIT1002. Introduction to comparative literary and cultural studies II: Gender studies (6 credits) Feminism, gender and sexuality, masculinity and femininity indeed, even what we mean by `men' and `women' are all areas of contemporary debate and always topical. This course introduces you to the subject of Comparative Literature by introducing the issues, which will remain important throughout your three years of study. We will look at what is meant by `gender' through critical readings of some crucial texts, and we will support examination of these texts by reference to some critical theories. CLIT1003. Introduction to comparative literary and cultural studies III: Digital culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) 33 Information technology nowadays has become such an encompassing cultural phenomenon that no one, not even the avowed technophobe, can ignore it. For a university student, competency in computer technology does not guarantee that she/he can comprehend the theoretical implications of the new technology. Against this backdrop, the present course aims at providing students with an upto-date overview of the technology-imbued society that we live in. Although the course is based upon literary and cultural approaches, it is also designed to be beneficial to students majoring in other disciplines. Advanced knowledge of computer technology is not a prerequisite for this course. Instead, students can take advantage of the workshop sessions to learn or refine skills in web surfing, webrelated research, and the design of simple web-sites. This course meets the University's IT requirement. CLIT1004. Introduction to comparative literary and cultural studies IV: Colonial and postcolonial culture Hong Kong and beyond (6 credits) The course explores the importance of the cultural representations of colonizer and colonized in forming the way we imagine the world today. Through film, fiction and other texts, students will study colonial practices, and the responses of the colonized. Hong Kong, China and Chinese people will form an integral part of the course. CLIT1005. Introduction to comparative literary and cultural studies V: Disney and global capital (6 credits) Disney is the name of an American business, and a world-wide phenomenon which is now coming to Hong Kong. Disney's animated feature films, starting with Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) and Pinocchio (1940) and Fantasia (1940) through to The Lion King (1994), Pocahontas (1995) and Mulan (1998) have dominated cinema through their spectacle and visual pleasure as well as through the songs and the soundtrack. The trend in the latest Disney films has been to deal with subjects from outside America - Africa, China, or America's Amerindian population. Disney theme-parks, whether in Los Angeles or Florida, or Paris or Tokyo (and now Hong Kong) raise the question of how much Disney has been responsible for globalization, and for making globalization the same as Americanization. In this course, we will look at Disney films and cartoon characters as examples of American ideology and of the presentation of the American way of life; we will analyse how the pleasure that they give works; we will look at Walt Disney as the originator of a business corporation and at the politics of global capitalism; we will ask how to read a Disney film, and examine what globalization means in the context of different Disney theme-parks. CLIT1006. Introduction to comparative literary and cultural studies VI: Cultural studies (6 credits) This course introduces students to some of the fundamental issues which are raised when we ask what "culture" is and how it forms us and creates our ways of thinking, talking and creating. To study a text or a film, a painting, or a piece of music, is not just to attend to the individual work, but to think about its context, and what permits its existence in that culture. To begin to read a text may mean to read a culture. There are three emphases in this course. The first thinks about the relation of culture to ideology. How do the narratives that we read, the films we see, present us with an unconscious ideology? And why is the study of culture as ideology so important? The second is the plurality of different cultural voices that we are surrounded by: "high" and "low," "elitist" and "popular." Is it useful to distinguish these? How can "cultural studies" read both types of cultural products adequately? The third emphasis is on how different cultural forms or expressions contest and perhaps subvert 34 official cultures, and ideological positions. CLIT1008. Ways of Reading: film, literature, and culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The objective of this course is to introduce to students different approaches and techniques to read a wide range of texts such as short stories, poems, films, photographs, fashion statements, architecture, the city and urban spaces. Drawing on Nietzsche's view that "slow reading" is important, the course will initiate students to close and critical reading as well as the psychoanalytical practice of "reading otherwise." The topics that we will explore include the following: What is the relation between a text and its social and cultural context? How do we read an event which generates multiple interpretations? How do we analyze a film-within-a-film structure? Can we decipher the meaning of what is absent in a text? How can the city be read? As Roland Barthes says, "those who fail to re-read are doomed to read the same text everywhere." The aim of the course is to learn the art of reading through different textual strategies. Students will also be introduced to a number of foundational concepts of critical and cultural theory. CLIT1009. Questioning difference: gender, postcolonialism and culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Through film and literature, this course introduces theoretical approaches to 3 main clusters of issues that cultures with colonial experiences need to deal with. Firstly, we will analyze cultural representations and issues of identity politics, such as the orientalist imagination and the nationalist imagination of culture, history and gender, as well as challenges to such imaginaries. We will also learn how to analyze the traumatic experience of racial and sexual discrimination under conditions of colonialism, slavery, exile and poverty, and the possibilities of survival and resistance. Texts from cultures that have undergone multiple colonial experiences will allow students to think also the issue of inter-racial relations not just between the West and the rest, but also among peoples of colour. Second- and Third-year Courses Students taking eight or more 6-credit courses in the department must normally have taken at least two of the First-year courses. The following courses - or from time to time other courses - will be offered, as teaching arrangements permit. Students who major or minor in the department can also choose from the History Department courses (with course codes "HIST") cross-listed in our syllabus to fulfill the requirements. SECOND OR THIRD YEAR CLIT2001. Comparative studies in narratives (6 credits) "The narratives of the world are numberless" so Roland Barthes begins a crucial essay which argues that we can study different narratives and find underlying assumptions at work in them. These assumptions tie different stories back to culture and ideology and to history. This course will look at a variety of different narratives, novels, short stories and films both to discover what is of value in them, and how they may be best analyzed. CLIT2003. Modern European drama (6 credits) 35 Questions about identity and "the self" are most urgently raised during periods of social, political and intellectual crises. This course studies in some depth the work of selected seminal European playwrights in relation to the crises of their time. Included may also be discussions of changing dramatic concepts, and the relevance to drama of other media (photography, cinema, television, video). Plays by Ibsen, Strindberg, Beckett, Brecht may be included to look at the way in which drama explores the history of the modern subject. CLIT2005. Literary and cultural theory (6 credits) This course is aimed at introducing some basic concepts of contemporary Western literary and cultural theory. We will examine the postmodern polemics against truth and objectivity, and see how this is related to our reading of literary and cultural texts. Students who intend to major in Comparative Literature are strongly encouraged to take this course. CLIT2007. Film culture I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course focuses on the construction of meaning in cinema and the development of film language. It first investigates the major structural components of the narrative film text, such as narrative structure, mise-en-scne, the camera eye, editing and sound, then proceeds to introduce the major cinematic movements in film history and discuss some film classics in relation to the topics covered. CLIT2008. Film culture II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course seeks to investigate critical methodologies for reading film texts with a particular emphasis on psychoanalytic, feminist, and postcolonial theories. The approach will be cross-cultural and inter-disciplinary. Film texts will be examined in relation to questions of gender, sexual difference, sexuality, and subjectivity. The films to be examined may include films from Hollywood and Asian cinemas. CLIT2014. Feminist cultural studies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will examine the complex and often contradictory ways women and modern femininity are represented in popular culture. It will introduce you to some of the key concepts in feminist cultural studies and use them to critique cultural productions and practices associated with women such as romance narratives, film melodrama, soap operas, fashion, and shopping. CLIT2016. The body in culture (6 credits) This course will explore various theoretical approaches as we attempt to develop discourses to address the notion of `the body'. There will be an emphasis on issues of corporeal identity, movement, and performance. We will present and discuss texts from the fields of philosophy, critical theory, psychoanalysis, architecture, literature, dance, theatre, film/media studies, gender studies, anthropology, technology, science, performance art, and cultural studies. 36 CLIT2017. A new introduction to modernism (6 credits) This course attempts to rethink the concept of modernism by looking at many different forms that it took (literary, filmic, musical and artistic), and interrogating its politics, its relationship to bourgeois culture, its gender-bias, its view of past and traditional and non-traditional texts, and its place in critical theory. In the light of what remains of `postmodernism,' it asks how the term `modernism' is now to be read. CLIT2018. Critiques of modernity (6 credits) This course will examine cultural critiques of, and reflections upon, modernity and its consequences in `the West' and the non-West (primarily China) over the past century or so. While the course will be informed by theoretical consideration of capitalist modernity and `alternative' modernities, the central texts discussed will be primary cultural texts that are foregrounded within their specific cultural contexts by the acuity and consciousness of their critique of modernity. Texts will be read as a metacommentary on modernity's contradictions. CLIT2021. Reading the nineteenth-century: revolution, romanticism and realism (6 credits) This course is one of two looking at the nineteenth-century in Europe and America through a reading of its texts: novels, poetry, painting, music, philosophical speculation, and psychoanalysis. Both courses are complete in themselves, but make most sense taken together. The first part looks at texts from the time of the French Revolution (1789) on to the Great Exhibition of 1851 - the triumph of bourgeois culture and of consumption over revolutionary aspiration. CLIT2022. Reading the nineteenth-century: reaction and modernity (6 credits) This is the second of two courses reading texts from the nineteenth-century. Fastening on the three `masters of suspicion' in the nineteenth-century - Marx, Nietzsche, Freud - it reads the triumph of realism and of bourgeois culture, and examines ways in which this culture was critiqued. Teaching will look at literary texts drawn from European cultures - Russia, France, Germany, Britain, and America. CLIT2023. Heterologies: the discourse of the other (6 credits) `Heterology' is `the science of what is completely other'. It, and the course, looks at a range of ways in which the `other' appears in literary texts - as the colonial savage, as mad, as mystic, as criminal, as sexually deviant, or in relation to fascism. CLIT2024. Reading comedy: Dante and Boccaccio (6 credits) There are two texts derived from the Italian Renaissance to be used for this course: Dante's Comedy, which divides into three - Inferno, Purgatory and Paradise, and Boccaccio's Decameron. These are crucially important and formative texts, the second a response to the first, which deserve re-reading both in order to confront texts of the past, and in the light of contemporary theoretical approaches from new historicism, from feminism, from work on the body and on sexuality and the city. We will examine the new forms of narrative that emerged with the urban and bourgeois culture of fourteenth- 37 century Florence, with its new attention to the subject as individual and as communal. Above all, we will be considering what is meant by `comedy' and why both Dante and Boccaccio work within its terms. CLIT2025. Visual cultures (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) It has often been said that ours is pre-eminently a culture of the visual, a `Society of the Spectacle'. This course introduces students to one of the key developments in cultural theory today: a study of how visual cultures are formed, and how they inform the ways we see, feel and think. There is indeed `an optical unconscious' made up of the criss-crossings of desire, ideology and reproductive technologies (or Freud, Marx and SONY), which manifests itself from ephemeral fashions to the permanencies of architecture. What the course will focus on, however, are specific examples of changes and innovations in visual culture found in art, photography, cinema, architecture, video, and urban life; and in particular, all the examples of visual material that problematize visuality. We will also attempt to draw out the implications of such problematic visualities for critical and cultural theory. CLIT2026. Digital culture and new media technologies I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the interactions between contemporary critical and cultural theory and digital culture. We will discuss theoretical and compositional approaches in the work of international new media artists (via World Wide Web, CD-ROM, video, exhibition and slide formats as available), and create new media projects ourselves, in order to expose possible modes of critical interpretation and creation for these media. Issues of identity construction, gender, corporeal vs. psychic presence, interactivity, bodily motion and motion capture, community, interface, performativity, and representation will be discussed. CLIT2027. Digital culture and new media technologies II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is a continuation of Digital Culture I. CLIT2028. The city as cultural text (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) If contemporary cities are becoming more `invisible', it is because the effects they have upon us are indirect and displaced. Our experience of cities becomes more problematic as cities themselves become more complex. This course explores the changing cultural space of cities mainly through major works of fiction and of cinema, though it will include other forms like painting and architecture as well as theoretical texts. Topics for discussion include: How is urban experience transformed by colonialism/imperialism, technology, information? What are the different ways of reading the city? Is Hong Kong a `Chinese city'? How can the city be read as a cultural text? Students are advised to take this course in their third year of study. 38 CLIT2031. Fashion theory (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Fashion lies somewhere between `art' and `consumption', and for mysterious reasons (according to historian Eric Hobsbawm) often anticipates future cultural tendencies better than both. We will discuss the relation of fashion to art, media, spectacles, and marketing; to questions of identity and self-fashioning; to images of the body and ideas of femininity and masculinity; to notions of style and anti-style (e.g. jeans as degree zero fashion); to looking and having `the look'. Throughout, the focus will be on the surprising impact of fashion on culture, particularly contemporary culture. CLIT2035. Writing madness (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Drawing on recent critical theory, the course will use both texts which have been described as mad, including those by Sylvia Plath, Charlotte Gilman, Holderlin, Blake, and Artaud; as well as look at representations of madness, e.g. in the writings of Gogol, Lu Xun, Dostoyevsky, and Henry James, or in films like Psycho or Seven. It will ask whether it is possible to think of writing a history of madness, without misrepresenting madness as `other.' It will also distinguish between melancholia and manic states, hysteria and schizophrenia, while recognising that these terms themselves, instrumental in the construction of madness, are part of the problem. CLIT2037. Gender and sexuality in contemporary Chinese literature and film (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The aim of the course is twofold: to serve as an introduction to some representative works in contemporary Chinese literature and film, and to analyze the representation of women in contemporary Chinese culture through these works. A key characteristic of contemporary Chinese literature and film is its obsession with gender and sexuality. Since the end of the Mao era and the beginning of the market reforms in the late 70s, "sex" has replaced "class" as one of the most frequently circulated motifs in the mass media and a new trend has thus emerged in contemporary Chinese literature and film with exclusive focus on issues of gender and sexuality. We will discuss this new phenomenon through two groups of writings: patriarchal representation of women and women's self-representation. CLIT2042. Reading confessing (6 credits) The objective of this course is to examine the relationship between literature and confession by examining some important works of literature produced in the West and the East. The nature and significance of the discourse of confession and how it inflects literary textuality is central to the purpose of this course. CLIT2045. Colonialism/postcolonialism (6 credits) This course studies a number of topics central to colonial/postcolonial studies such as Orientalism and Occidentalism, colonial and postcolonial identities, sexuality and colonial discourse, and gender and imperialism. These issues will be examined from a cross-disciplinary and comparative perspective and the primary sources used include travel narratives, novels, films, advertisements, and tourist 39 brochures. CLIT2050. Globalization and culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) When Michael Jordan becomes the most popular sports figure in Mainland China and South Africa, does this mean that we are all becoming more alike? Or are we splitting apart, as the rise of new nationalisms in Yugoslavia and India would seem to indicate? Why has rap music become globally popular? This course will look at a variety of contemporary phenomena from pop culture to nationalism in terms of the global processes of circulation and transformation that are changing the world we live in. Special attention will be paid to Hong Kong culture and its changing role in Asia and the world. CLIT2051. Jane Austen and popular culture (6 credits) This course will read Jane Austen's novels through the visual medium of television series, film adaptations and the internet. It will consider the successful translation of Austen from high to popular and to global cultural form. It will study the ways in which her novels have been re-invented to reflect issues of contemporary importance such as feminism with its critique of marriage and masculinity and its call for more open expression of desire and sexuality. It will historicize this revision by analyzing the status of women, the role of the family and the importance of courtship in Austen's original novels. CLIT2052. Chinese urban culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) With specific reference to major Chinese cities, for example Beijing, Shanghai, Taipei, and Hong Kong, the course is designed to examine how forces of modernization, colonialism and globalization have drastically transformed these cities. It explores problems of urban culture and the changing meaning of `Chineseness' through major works of fiction, cinema, architecture and other relevant cultural texts. Although no prerequisites are required, students are advised to study CLIT2028 `The City as Cultural Text' before taking this course. CLIT2057. Carnival versus tragedy: Reading renaissance culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course looks at how we can read the `early modern' period in Europe from the fifteenth century (the period of planning the ideal city and designing the ideal body, of the development of the printed book and of the colonization of America) to the seventeenth centuries. It uses the twin concepts of carnival and tragedy to look at the theatre, at representations of the body, monstrous and grotesque, and for an examination of state power and resistances to it. Texts include works by Machiavelli, Rabelais, Shakespeare and Racine. CLIT2058. Histories of sexuality (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening 40 purposes.) The course compares the theoretical approaches of Freud and Foucault to sexuality a history of repression versus a history of the production of the subject by looking at a number of literary and cultural texts whose interest for us is how they make problematic and fascinating either theory of the subject. Included will also be discussions of other critics and theorists (e.g. Judith Butler, Julia Kristeva, Eve Sedgwick) who refine or critique these two major theoretical approaches to the study of sexuality. CLIT2060. Fiction and film in contemporary Chinese societies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course studies modern Chinese culture as it is expressed and understood in contemporary stories and films. It aims to explore relationships between narrative arts and society. It also examines literature and film in relation to each other, as well as literary and aesthetic theories, themes, genres and expressive modes. CLIT2061. Narratives of the past in contemporary culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Organized around different kinds of narratives of the past in contemporary culture, this course raises basic questions about historical representation: What is `history'? How is it differentiated from `memory' and `nostalgia'? In what way is a spatial critique of culture pertinent to the study of historical representation? With reference to a range of texts such as literature, film, museum narratives, architecture and music from different cultures, the course explores the politics and poetics of historical representation in contemporary societies. Topics for discussion may include: tensions between official history and personal memory, different styles and forms of imagining and narrating history, and the role of the media and other cultural means such as oral narratives in the mediation of `history'. CLIT2064. Hong Kong culture: Popular culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course explores the various aspects of popular culture in Hong Kong from the perspective of Cultural Studies. Major media and other popular forms of expression to be discussed include: television, radio, newspapers and popular magazines, popular music, popular literature, cartoons, youth, and fan culture. Theories of Cultural Studies will be introduced and discussed in relation to critical readings of such texts in order to expand the students' horizons in understanding and interpreting Hong Kong popular culture. CLIT2065. Hong Kong culture: Representations of identity in literature and film (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course traces the formation of identities in Hong Kong history and analyzes different perspectives in understanding these identities. It focuses on various forms of colonization and their influences on the construction of cultural artifacts and relationships. Various theoretical approaches and debates on postcolonialism, capitalism, and urban culture will be adopted to examine selected 41 texts of literature and film. CLIT2066. Postmodernism (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) We are constantly bombarded with images by the media day and night. MTV is equally popular in the developed as well as in the developing countries. The old distinction between high culture and popular culture is breaking down. Literary and cinematic genres are being constantly mixed, resulting in composite and hybrid works. More and more Hong Kong Chinese live in Toronto, Melbourne, London and San Francisco while more and more Filipinos come to Hong Kong as housemaids. The postmodern world is full of fascinating phenomena. In this course we plan to study postmodernism by focusing on literature, cinema, art, and other cultural productions. The aim of the course is not to define postmodernism but rather to evoke and question it as we seek to make sense of the radical changes taking place in ideas and experiences related to technology, entertainment, art, everyday life and the problems of representation. CLIT2067. Re-placing Shakespeare (6 credits) This course `replaces' Shakespeare not by removing his work from the agenda, but by reconsidering his place in contemporary criticism and popular cultural practice. Some of the topics the course may deal with are: feminist, psychoanalytic and literary historicist re-readings of Shakespeare's texts; comparisons of how international film directors, with their differing multi-cultural perspectives, have handled the problems of filming Shakespeare; and the way that Shakespeare has been adapted and reimagined by innovative and influential modern artists. CLIT2069. The making of modern masculinities (6 credits) Using cross-cultural materials taken from a wide range of media such as films, fiction, magazines, paintings, TV and advertising, this course engages in a multidisciplinary study of the formation of different types of masculinities in the modern world. CLIT2070. Heidegger and everydayness (6 credits) As one of the most important Western thinkers of the 20th century, Heidegger addresses fundamental questions of human existence in ways that speak directly to our everyday experiences. For instance, why do we sometimes feel that life is meaningless, and how do we try to avoid this feeling? This course will introduce you to some of Heidegger's core ideas through a study of his masterpiece Being and Time, which has had a profound impact not only on philosophy but also on literary theory. Students will learn both about Heidegger and the intellectual traditions he challenged. CLIT2072. Deconstruction (6 credits) This course examines the method of deconstruction around such issues as truth, power, subjectivity, modernity, postmodernity, and so on. Readings include texts by Derrida himself and by some other thinkers (e.g. Nietzsche, J. L. Austin, Habermas). CLIT2073. Deleuze on cinema (6 credits) 42 Though not a film-maker or theorist, Deleuze's writings on cinema (which combine film theory and analyses, philosophy and cultural criticism) may prove to be as seminal as Eisenstein's or Bazin's. The course will introduce students to what is innovative about Deleuze's two books on cinema. This includes his radical manner of analysing films: instead of focusing on `film language', he focuses on the kind of cinematic image each film constructs. Thus the books offer at one level a classification of different types of cinematic images. However, underlying the analyses is also a very provocative thesis about the `history' of cinema, which Deleuze argues has undergone a crucial mutation: from different forms of `the movement-image' pioneered by the classic cinema, to the much more elusive forms of `the time-image' which characterize the contemporary cinema - with Hitchcock as the fulcrum around which the history of cinema turns. Finally, and most significantly, Deleuze relates both the `movement-image' and the `time-image' to developments in thought and culture; and this enables him to formulate, through the analyses of cinema, ideas like `any-space-whatever', `the crystals of time', `the powers of the false', and `the thought of the outside' - which take us way beyond the limits of film criticism. The great directors, Deleuze says, have to be compared to thinkers. The implication is that understanding cinema is understanding modern thought itself - its crises, ruptures and possibilities. CLIT2074. Film and ideology in post-Mao China (6 credits) This course offers (a) a survey of contemporary Chinese film, especially the most recent productions of mainstream cinema, and (b) a critical examination of post-Mao ideology in the context of market reforms. Topics include the following. (1) The meaning of wealth: We will look at how wealth is represented in post-Mao film, and whether this representation coheres with the Party's political program and serves the purpose of interpellating the general public. (2) The identity of the post-Mao hero. In post-Mao China, there is no longer any cinematic representation of the working class as hero and thus no more ideological interpellation of the working class as the central constituent of the Party. The entrepreneur has replaced the proletarian as the new hero of the reform era. (3) The resexualization of the population. The practice of Marxism in China after 1949 led to the disavowal of gender and sexuality as a suitable object of cultural representation. The population was de-sexualized, in the sense that no cultural `signifiers' were available in the Maoist discourse to inscribe men and women as sexual beings. In post-Mao China, `sex' has come back with a vengeance through the rediscovery of patriarchal sexual conventions, and `woman' of a particular class has become the signifier of sexual difference. The course will pay special attention to film language. Films will be treated as a collection of cinematic signifiers that contribute to the meaning of the texts rather than serving as transparent vehicles for plots. CLIT2075. Reading modern poetry (6 credits) This course will do two things: it will study some fine examples of poetry, asking the following questions: what is poetry? How does it work? Why should we read it, and how? Where should we start? What is the good of poetry? Its time-span is the moment when Europe and America defined themselves as modern, as part of the modern world. So, it will begin with two examples of Romanticism, will continue with the urban poetry of Paris and the modernism it produced; it will look at three very different examples of American poetry, some of it obsessed with the question of how this poetry should relate to anything traditional and European; it will conclude with the Europe of the political crisis of two world wars, after which, as Adorno said - `Auschwitz made lyric poetry impossible.' Adorno is not necessarily to be agreed with, and much poetry would question his formulation, but his voice is important in a debate over the functions of poetry, and where it comes from. There will be then, a mixture of English, French, American, German and Russian poetry: all of it will 43 be looked at in English. CLIT2076. Fashioning Femininities (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to the writings of some major contemporary feminists and their critical analysis of the construction of the images and roles of women. Cross-cultural materials taken from both print and non-print media will be used to illustrate feminist issues. CLIT2078. Childhood, feminine roles and cultural myths (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will begin with `liminal' works which chart a traumatic rite of passage for women from childhood to adulthood or suggest that there might be a dynamic interplay between the two states. It will focus, in particular, on texts in which women directly challenge prevailing social myths of human development, family organization, and sexual relations. It will be especially interested in texts which proceed to deconstruct the social codes governing women, their relationships, and their scope for defining and expressing themselves. CLIT2079. Traumatic events (6 credits) This course will observe the workings of trauma (the enactment and working-through of collective and individual symptoms of trauma), memory, and witnessing in various modes of everyday life. We will examine notions of catastrophe, disaster, accident, and violence, and explore the possibilities and impossibilities of bearing witness in many forms of cultural production. We will examine the representation of traumatic events in fiction, poetry, architecture, critical theory, visual art, philosophy, science, cartoons, film, video, television reportage, newspaper documentation, and performance, on the internet and World Wide Web, and in the public and domestic spaces of Hong Kong. CLIT2080. Walter Benjamin as writer and cultural critic (6 credits) The course is an introduction to the seminal work of Walter Benjamin. His essays - on literature, translation, photography and film, culture and politics, the experience of cities - develop a theory of reading and a style of argument that are indispensable to the understanding of contemporary cultural debates. CLIT2081. Becoming post-human: animal bodies and virtual bodies (6 credits) We study `Humanities', but is there a relationship between humanist values and the global crises currently being experienced in environmental damage? What differences have cinema and even more, digital technologies made to perceptions of space, time, embodiment and human presence? That our cinematic and electronic lives have transformed us as subjects is apparent, but how they have altered consciousness and identity is for discussion. These changes have redefined the human, and `nature' and `human nature' and the course assumes a current overthrowing of the human within critical theory and within digitalization, and the appearance of the `non-species' (Derrida). It looks at `ecocriticism' and explores the posthuman body as this has come into question in relation to new technologies. 44 CLIT2083. Film art, language and culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines key ways of analyzing film art and culture. How films create meaning and how viewers make sense of the cinema frame this exploration of film as visual language and culture. The course places emphasis on learning basic film terminology and the rudiments of film form. The student becomes acquainted with classical Hollywood cinema, other national cinemas, transnational cinemas, as well as hybrid, experimental and documentary film modes. At the conclusion of the course, the student should be able to look at motion pictures critically, understand films as formal constructs, and place films within broader institutional, economic, ideological, and cultural contexts. CLIT2084. "New" cinemas across national boundaries (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to several prominent "new" cinemas after the Second World War. "The timing" [and spacing], are "something like: around 1948, Italy; about 1958, France; about 1968, Germany." They were moments and localities that gave rise to new cinematic images, "as if the cinema had to begin again from zero, questioning afresh all the accepted facts of the American tradition," wrote Gilles Deleuze in Cinema 1. And in his book Hong Kong, published in 1997, Ackbar Abbas added "about 1982, Hong Kong" to the Deleuzian timing and spacing. As one of the losers in the Second World War, Italy escaped from fascism relatively successfully, and could point to a resistance and a popular life underlying oppression. This is favourable for the birth of a new type of narrative including the elliptical and the unorganised, questioning afresh the accepted and globalized American convention. The French, as victors delayed by being within the French dream, broke with its tradition rather belatedly and by a reflexive or intellectual detour which was that of the New Wave. And the Germans, confined by its late escape from fascism, even more belatedly dwell on the constantly variable spatio-temporal link. The case of Hong Kong, as a case beyond Deleuze's scope, illuminates a rethinking of his thesis in a global context. Between 1942 and 1997, Hong Kong was a British colony. It is in the 80s and 90s that the British and Chinese governments negotiated about the handover of Hong Kong in 1997, and thus ignited a new Hong Kong cinema as a responsive cinematic intervention. The first part of the course examines the ways Italian neorealism, the French new wave, the new German cinema, and the new Hong Kong cinema react to their specific geo-historical situations. In the second part, the focus will be shifted to some very recent films and look back at the agendas of the "new" cinemas in the last few decades. CLIT2085. Hong Kong: Community and cultural policy in the global context (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Cultural production is becoming the new drive for the world's global and local economy. Dynamic cultural planning has been gaining currency worldwide as a way to integrate cultural demands, planning objectives, and socioeconomic goals. How does Hong Kong fare in this picture? New studies on global cultural policies show that "managerialism" and "entrepreneurialism" in planning prioritize entertainment, tourism, and architecture, resulting in an unsustainable build-up of cultural hardware. Similarly, the West Kowloon Cultural District is an issue of competitive urban growth vs. sustainable cultural development. The heavy reliance on the hardware build-up exposes not only the lack of perspective on culture policy (the "cultural" infrastructure), but essentially, the absence of cultural planning and cultural policy. Other countries in recent years have stressed the importance of 45 cultural policies that are sustainable, democratic and grounded in community needs. This is an intellectual and policy gap that we can, and ought to, fill. This course equips students with the capacity to understand and participate in Hong Kong cultural policy analysis and planning in the local condition and the global context. CLIT2086. Asia on global screens (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is designed to acquaint the student with the diverse national cinemas of Asia and with the ways "Asia" as a continent has been depicted in films from around the world. The interconnections among various national cinemas of Asia, the visualization of Asia and its people in Hollywood and European film, and the transnational history of Asian global film culture are given serious consideration in this course. Drawing on an eclectic blend of popular and "art" films, documentaries and experimental works, we will explore Asia on world screens within political, national, economic, and cultural contexts. Special attention will be paid to film as a popular art (e.g., Hong Kong martial arts films), the representation of women (e.g., in Hollywood, European, and Asian melodramas), and alternative media practices (Asian American independent film). Although the emphasis in this course is on cinema, the relationship between film and other arts will also be examined. CLIT2087. Modern Chinese culture and society: Rebellions and revolutions (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course focuses on the cultural, economic and other transformations of modern China, as reflected and variously represented in select literary, media, ethnographic, scholarly and "primary" documents from China and the West. We will study select moments of both late Qing and Post-Mao China, including the Opium Wars and Tiananmen, but the bulk of our efforts will be directed towards a neglected but crucial and still-living period: "Maoist" China, from roughly the 1930s through the 1970s. Put another way, this course will take a "cultural studies" or interdisciplinary approach to China's quest to transform the world's longest standing dynastic order into a revolutionary, egalitarian society. We will place the most stress on the rise, evolution, and impact of the revolution and of Chinese communism in particular, and we will ask what impacts this entailed both within China and the world at large, in terms of both Chinese development and the global Cold War. CLIT2088. Critical approaches to film studies (6 credits) This course is designed to acquaint the student with the principal critical methods and theoretical debates of film theory. In addition to providing a survey of film theories, this course focuses on the interconnections of theory with film criticism and production practices. A range of fiction and nonfiction films will be screened, including early Soviet, classical Hollywood, Third Cinema, French New Wave, and contemporary international productions. Theoretical perspectives include structuralism, semiology, Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, queer theory, post-structuralism, and cultural studies. Some of the theoretical issues covered include questions of narrative and narration, realism, formalism, modernism, postmodernism, post-colonialism, gender, sexuality, ideology, authorship, and genre. CLIT2089. Culture and `queer' theory (6 credits) `Queer theory' has been developed over the past fifteen years in order to deal with the expanding 46 subject of lesbian and gay writings and film, and the increasing representation of lesbian and gay writings and film, and the increasing representation of homosexuality within modern cultures. This course will discuss a number of the texts of `queer theory' by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler and Eve Sedgwick, and will study a variety of texts, contemporary and historical, which in literature or in allegorical terms have represented male and female homosexuality, whether directly or indirectly. It will study how these changes of representation, and new critical theories have repositioned the subject of gender studies. HIST2082. Europe and its other (6 credits) This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of European perception and understanding of nonEuropean peoples and cultures from the 18th 20th centuries. The objective of the course is to show how Western representations of non-Europeans were shaped by the various political debates, scientific theories and colonial ideology that dominated European societies of the time. The course uses the conceptual frameworks and methodologies of history and cultural studies to analyze a wide range of primary materials that include visual documents, travel narratives, fiction, scientific texts, philosophical treatises, and documentaries. HIST2083. Gender, sexuality and empire (6 credits) This course investigates the ways in which concepts of gender and sexuality have been used in British and French imperial discourse during the 19th and 20th centuries to manage their relationships with the colonized peoples and to showcase the superiority of European civilization. Part one of the course examines how the male colonial identities were constructed through the sexualization of the colonized subjects while the second half of the course focuses on the multiple roles of European women in the colonies. The course uses the conceptual frameworks and methodologies of history and cultural studies to analyze different types of historical narratives ranging from archival documents, personal memoirs and correspondence, travel accounts to autobiographical texts. HIST2084. Sexing the spirit: the history of the modern feminist challenge to Christianity (6 credits) Surveys of mainstream feminism have generally omitted the subject of faith. They have taken as a given wholesale feminist hostility to Christianity and have concluded that religion has little importance in the life of modern women. Recent global events are a reminder however that religion remains a passionate if volatile force in contemporary culture and politics. This course will consider a history that has been overlooked the critical engagement of modern feminism with Christianity. The course will begin with two mid-twentieth century events that have proved to be crucial catalysts in the active feminist response to Christian religion. The first was the ordination of Florence Li Tim Oi as the first Anglican woman priest in Hong Kong in 1944. The second was Simone de Beauvoir's publication of the The Second Sex in 1949. Li's courageous war-time decision to pioneer female entrance into the all-male clerical establishment constitutes a reformist engagement with Christianity, while de Beauvoir's rejection of Christianity as a patriarchal institution oppressive to women reflects a more radical and uncompromising stance. Their two positions can be read as representational of the compatibility/incompatibility, reform/revolutionist debate that feminists have had with Christianity since the rise of second wave feminism in the 1960s. HIST2085. The history of modern sexual identity and discourse (6 credits) This course will focus on two `new sciences' arising in the late nineteenth century that have shaped 47 the modern understanding of sexual behaviour sexology and psychoanalysis. It will look at some of the key thinkers who pioneered sexology such as Havelock Ellis, Edmund Carpenter, Richard von Krafft-Ebing, and Maria Stopes alongside the acknowledged founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud. It will investigate primary sources in sexual science that have subject to censorship and not generally unavailable, until recently, for comparative study with Freudian discourse. Though the texts of sexology and psychoanalysis often start from different premises, all have been instrumental in the development of modern sexual language, assumptions and practices. It will contextualize their collective thinking by considering the impact of the emergent women's movement, of Darwin's evolutionary theory, of urban culture, and of secular modernity. It will study the historiographical debate (particularly among gay and feminist theorists) as to whether these early investigators of sexology and psychoanalysis formulated progressive or repressive, revolutionary or conservative definitions of sexuality. It will explore the far-reaching consequences that these thinkers have had on attitudes to the body and people in the form of reproductive control, eugenics, race, homosexuality, the `woman question,' and the politics of sexual identity. Fine Arts FIRST YEAR FINE1001. Introduction to western art history (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will introduce students to the art of Europe from the periods of ancient Greek and Roman civilization to the art of the twentieth century. Major developments in painting and sculpture will be studied, with the aim of giving students an understanding of the main characteristics of the art produced, and the relationship of art to the culture in which it was created. No previous knowledge of art history is assumed. Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination. FINE1004. Introduction to Chinese art history (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course gives an overview of the development of different forms of Chinese art in history. Students are introduced to the concept of visual analysis and art appreciation. Discussions are based on several generic themes, such as the nature of the pieces, the effects of ideology, and the influence of the ruling dynasties. In the course of the study, the social context under which the art pieces were made is constantly highlighted. No previous knowledge of art history is expected. Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination. FINE1006. Art and society (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces visual and critical skills for interpreting the art of different cultures from both the past and the present. We examine a variety of themes related to the techniques and functions of art, and we study the way art expresses various moral, social, political, and religious ideas. Students will gain a better understanding of cross-cultural communication and will learn how to analyze the powerful visual culture of the contemporary world. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE1007. Introduction to photography theory and practice (6 credits) 48 (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to introduce students to principles of contemporary photography theory and a critical practice of the photographic medium. In addition to the teaching of basic photographic techniques, the course will also discuss how we can assess photographs with critical tools such as aesthetics and cultural theories. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE1008. Introduction to Asian art history (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This survey course introduces major themes in art from early formations of Asian civilizations to the twenty-first century. Students investigate the various forms of art production in China, Japan, India and Southeast Asia with an emphasis on the means by which art creates meaning in diverse Asian cultures. Themes include issues such as patronage, personal style, artistic autonomy, art institutions and collecting practices. Assessment: 100% coursework. SECOND AND THIRD YEARS The following courses are open to both second and third year students. Prerequisites, if required, are stated in the course descriptions. If staffing arrangements permit, the following courses will be offered: FINE2012. Italian Renaissance art (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will examine the painting and sculpture of Italy from about 1300 to 1550. Beginning with Giotto's new approach to painting, the course will explore artistic developments in Italy throughout this period, concluding with a study of the art of the High Renaissance. The impact of the Antique and the interest in mathematics, characteristic of the Italian Renaissance, will be among the topics discussed. Assessment: 65% coursework, 35% examination. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE 1008. FINE2013. Northern Renaissance art (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will examine the art produced in Flanders, France, and Germany between about 1300 and 1550, focusing primarily on painting and printmaking. It will begin with early 14th century illuminated manuscripts and the subsequent development of the International Style. It will then consider Flemish 15th century painting in some detail, concluding with a study of Flemish and German art of the 16th century. Assessment: 65% coursework, 35% examination. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2020. American art (6 credits) 49 (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course surveys painting, sculpture, photography, and architecture in the United States from European settlement to 1945. The underlying theme will be the ways in which art in the United States has helped project various new ideologies and values associated with this young and unique nation. Issues to be considered in relation to art will include Protestant values, democracy, wilderness, racial conflict, capitalism, popular culture, and America's gradual rise to power. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2025. The art of the Baroque (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will examine the art of the 17th century in Italy, Flanders, Spain, the Netherlands and France. The emphasis will be on painting, although sculpture will be studied as well. Particular attention will be given to the impact of the Counter Reformation, the features of Baroque naturalism, the use of allegory, and attitudes towards the antique by artists of this period. Assessment: 65% coursework, 35% examination. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2026. The age of revolution: Art in Europe, 1750-1840 (6 credits) This course examines the radical transformation in European art from the age of kings to the age of revolutions, c.1750-1840. Painting, sculpture, and printmaking will be discussed in relation to various historical developments, including the decline of aristocratic culture and Christianity; the rise of science, industry, and democracy; and new, Romantic notions of nature, individuality, nationalism, and primitivism. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2027. The formation of modernity: Art in Europe, 1840-1890 (6 credits) This course examines the early formation of modern European visual culture, from Realism to Impressionism. The underlying historical theme will be the rise of bourgeois society. Painting, sculpture, printmaking, and photography will be discussed in the context of related ideological issues such as industrial capitalism, mass media, urban leisure, tourism, new gender roles, and European imperialism. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2028. Vision in crisis (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) In art, as in other fields of knowledge, the late 19th century and the early 20th century was a time when pre-existing assumptions were challenged in a radical way. To certain artists in Europe, for instance, illusionistic realism or the conventions of perspective no longer seemed adequate tools for representing the world and our experience of it. Amongst the factors provoking this crisis of vision was an increasing awareness of other cultures and their differing modes of visual representation, and many non-Western artists shared with their Western counterparts this new sense of the relativity of 50 cultural knowledge, although they tended to respond to it in different ways. Vision in Crisis will examine this moment of great artistic change, focusing primarily on European examples, with Chinese art being taken as the main non-Western case for study. Artists whose work may be discussed in depth include Van Gogh, Gauguin, Czanne, Picasso and Matisse. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2029. Modernity and its discontents (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Although certain 20th century artists can be taken as celebrating the modern, many artists offered instead a critical engagement with the newly-emerging forms of experience they were encountering, or sought various forms of escape from them. While the response of European artists to the modern condition is most well known, artists from other parts of the world were equally engaged with the task of creating an art adequate to the new environment in which they found themselves. Both will be considered in this course, which will focus primarily on European art of the first half of the 20th century. Chinese art will provide the main non-Western case for study. Abstract art, Futurism, Expressionism, Dada and Surrealism may all be considered. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2030. Towards the global (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Paris has been described as the capital of the 19th century, and indeed one can talk of a European cultural hegemony that lasted until the outbreak of the Second World War. The postwar period, however, saw a migration of cultural authority across the Atlantic to the United States, and with the ending of the Cold War American cultural dominance seemed to become even more deeply entrenched. If the close of the colonial era did not then eliminate the asymmetry of power between Western and non-Western cultures, it did at least alter the conditions for artistic production in the latter. Furthermore, with an increasing pace of globalization at the end of the century, the opportunities for non-Western artists to reach new audiences have expanded enormously. This course will begin with a consideration of Pollock and Abstract Expressionism, and later developments in American art will be a major focus of the course, which will also be concerned to document the contribution of nonWestern artists. A thematic approach will be adopted, with tendencies such as Pop Art, Minimal and Post-Minimal art, Environmental and Installation Art, Performance Art, Conceptual and NeoConceptual Art being amongst those which may be considered. A wide variety of artworks dating from 1945 to the present day will be discussed. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2031. The rise of modern architecture in Western culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Tracing the development of Western architecture from ancient Greece onward, this course focuses on the 19th and 20th centuries, from Neoclassicism in Washington, D.C. and Haussman's renovation of Paris to the Bauhaus in Germany and the international spread of Modernism and Postmodernism. Emphasis is placed on the way buildings express institutional ideologies, as well as on construction 51 technology and architectural theory. Hong Kong architecture figures prominently throughout. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2032. Art and the portrayal of women (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will consider the representation of women in Western art. The approach will be thematic, and examples ranging from medieval to modern will be considered. Topics will include `good' women (virgins, saints, mothers, wives) and `bad' (fallen women, temptresses, witches), as well as the nude and the portrait. Both religious and secular images will be considered. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2033. Cross-cultural interaction in the 19th century (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Tracing the rise of global visual cultures, this course examines artistic interactions between Western and non-Western cultures brought on by colonialism, war, trade, and scientific exploration in the period 1750-1900. We study how European and American artists viewed the cultures they encountered in China, Japan, India, the Near East and elsewhere, as well as how non-Westerners viewed the West. Emphasis is placed on the varied processes of cultural interaction and on the importance of such interaction for the development of modernity in different cultural contexts. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2034. Hong Kong art workshop (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will introduce Hong Kong art and related aspects of Hong Kong visual culture. It will be taught in a workshop format, and will provide the opportunity for students to develop skills in art criticism as well as an understanding of Hong Kong art history. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: At least one FINE2000 level course. FINE2035. Photography and the nineteenth century (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course studies the history of photography in the nineteenth century: its invention and technological evolution, its various early practices, and its interactions with other cultural practices. In discussing these topics it also investigates the social, cultural and ideological problems to which the medium gave rise especially in the Western world and the era of modernity. Some introductory practical lessons and field trips are included so that students can have a better understanding of the actual photographic process. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2036. Photography in the twentieth century (6 credits) 52 (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course investigates the history of photography in the twentieth century. It charts how earlier photographic practices evolved and were transformed in the new era, and traces the workings of new practices such as photojournalism and fashion photography. As modernism and avant-gardism have pervaded twentieth century culture and arts, this course also focuses on how photography responded to these tendencies in different countries. Finally, it considers the medium's role in the age of global culture and digital imaging. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2042. Chinese material culture I: Neolithic to Tang (6 credits) China is considered to have at least five thousand years of continuous cultural development. This course will be a chronological survey of the material culture of China from the Neolithic period to the Tang dynasty. Students will explore the factors contributing to China's rich and unique visual culture through the study of early Chinese painted pottery, jades, bronzes, ceramics and sculptural works. The course will also address the impact of historical, philosophical and religious developments in China during this period on the production and uses of art. Students will be encouraged to consider how the relationship of art to personal and cultural identity has evolved from the development of archaeology in China. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2043. Chinese material culture II: Song to Qing (6 credits) This course will be a survey of the development of material culture in China from the Song dynasty to the fall of imperial China in 1911 and will focus in particular on the influence of imperial taste on art production. Ceramics in particular have reflected the aesthetics of the Court, from austere Buddhistinfluenced expression to the highly decorative western-influenced wares of the Qing court, and so will feature prominently in the objects to be considered. Also included will be the iconography of tomb figurines and stone sculpture in imperial mausoleums as well as religious sculpture, bronzes, and carving in jade, wood, lacquer and bamboo. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2044. The whys of where: visual geographies of China and Japan (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will examine the relationship between image-making and cultural encounters at regional and trans-national levels, and the role of visual artifacts in the making of real and imaginative geographies. The module will begin with 16th century Jesuit missionaries propagating their "universal history" with, amongst many things, world maps, and end with an investigation of modern Chinese artists' visions of an "East" in the global context. Themes will be organized into two or three week classes, which are designed to stimulate students into making comparisons and parallels. This course will examine a range of visual artifacts including visual technologies, such as cartography and photography, and how these have changed the ways in which we look. Although the emphasis is on space and territory, the visual themes investigated will also include portraits and architecture, as well as landscapes. There will be a one hour lecture with a one hour seminar to discuss images, themes and readings held later during the week. Assessment: 100% coursework. 53 Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2045. Colour and culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Colour is a fascinating topic. What do our favourite colours say about us? Why do we prefer one colour over another? Can we define colours as feminine and masculine? Why do we say we feel `blue' when we are depressed? What colour best symbolizes your self-concept? Are the meanings of colours culturally constructed? We will explore the world of colour in visual culture, particularly Asian art, using a variety of texts from art, mythology, science, psychology, film, culture, gender, literature, and even fashion to help us examine the uses and meanings of colour. We will compare the theories and techniques relating to colour of various disciplines based on different theme. Students are encouraged to be creative in their approaches in investigating this controversial topic. The core texts will be mainly books but photographs, slides and materials from Internet searches will also be utilized in our discussions. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2046. Art and the human body (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The human body has become a central concern both in academic theory and in the wider culture. The body in art functions as a sign that transcends the physical body. It represents a range of metaphorical meanings, which artists delineate through the use of context, framing and style. This course will examine art that employs various methods of representing the human body. Throughout history, the metamorphosis ranges from the unified body of academic theory in classical proportion and the Christian body made in God's image, to the standardised body of consumer culture. In examining the depiction of the body from Asian, Tribal, and Western cultures, we will explore social, political, religious, and cultural influences in the construction of corporal representation. Reading materials will be mainly books but photographs, popular magazines, TV programmes, films, and materials from Internet search will also be utilized in our discussions. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2047. Arts of India (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the painting and sculpture of the Indian subcontinent and considers the impact of religion, politics, and patronage on art. Through an interdisciplinary approach, we focus on Buddhist and Vedic/Hindu art in its religious context and the later art patronage of the Muslim and Mughal rulers. The course will conclude by investigating the art of colonized India through the twentieth century. The various styles of Indian art are discussed in their respective historical, religious, social, and cultural contexts. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2048. Arts of Japan (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) 54 This course surveys Japanese visual arts by looking at the historically changing role of the artist/producer. Lectures will proceed chronologically, beginning with the tomb figurines of prehistory and ending with prints and photography . We will mainly view painting, sculpture, and architecture, but also consider calligraphy, ceramics, and fashion. Rather than attempting to be completely comprehensive, our exploration will be selective, considering both famous and lesser-known artists and works. Broadly, we will consider the ways Japanese visual culture was transformed in different periods under the impact of shifting patterns of patronage, sociopolitical development, and foreign contact. We will also conduct close readings of individual artworks to decode and understand their symbolic, descriptive and expressive values. The aim is to establish a solid critical foundation on which to develop an understanding of Japanese art history. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2049. Art and gender in China (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This class will examine the role of gender in the production, consumption, and interpretation of Chinese art. Classes are chronologically organized into three broad time periods covering different themes each week. Topics will include the coding of landscapes and bird-and-flower paintings as gendered spaces, and the construction of male and female socio-political identities in portraits and figure paintings. The course is not intended to provide an overview of Chinese art, but a base that can challenge traditional perceptions of what constitutes masculinity and femininity. The broad historical frame will address how socio-cultural factors influencing gender roles in the arts, culture, and society changed over time. It will, more importantly, look at how these issues intersect with questions of ethnicity, social hierarchy, economic and cultural capital, and nationalism. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisites: FINE1001, FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2050. Interpretations of Chinese landscape painting (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the history and significance of land and its depiction in China from the fifth to the twentieth century. Students will examine the cultural circumstances that promoted landscape as one of the most, if not the most, valued subjects in Chinese art. Emphasis is placed on historical and interpretive issues that are important to the analysis of artwork and meaning. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: FINE1001, FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. FINE2051. Art, politics, and society in modern China (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will consider the techniques and materials of art produced in modern China during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Our fundamental concern will be to examine art and modernity in its context: not just the art works themselves but the construction of a cultural discourse around art and art history. Topics explored will range from artistic identities and the art market to inter-cultural relations and critical interpretations of the subject. We will identify chains of transmission, search for other echoes, encounters and exchanges between artistic trends, politics, and society. Through examining art works in different medias, including traditional ink and colour painting, oil painting, pictorial illustration, woodcut prints and printed advertising, along with 55 theoretical writing, bibliographical and institutional data, the course will investigate the conflicts that underpinned Chinese artistic development and its negotiations with modernity. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2052. Architecture of South and Southeast Asia (6 credits) This course is a study of the developments in architecture in South and Southeast Asia. It will offer a selective overview of the styles, theories, and structures of architecture from antiquity to the twentyfirst century. This course utilizes a thematic approach aimed at understanding the relationships between private property, public authority, and power as articulated in architecture. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2053. Beauties and the Beasts: Song and Yuan Painting (6 credits) This course will examine the relationships between imagery and text from the late Tang to the Yuan dynasty. In addition, the rise of "genre painting" or paintings of the lives of the commoners in this time period will be explored. Various literary traditions associated with the appreciation of Chinese paintings will be central to our investigation. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2054. Visual Culture of Modern Japan (6 credits) This course examines the visual culture of modern Japan beginning with the 17th century. Areas of discussion will include prints and paintings depicting the kabuki theater and the pleasure quarters; the modernization of the city as a Western-style capital when Edo becomes Tokyo; design and architecture in the 20th century; and gender-bender modern art. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2055. Crossing Cultures: China and the Outside World (6 credits) This course will begin with the 16th century and the arrival of the Jesuits and continue to the present. It will examine artists' responses to the outside world and investigate how cultural exchanges were formed, merged, and clashed. Topics covered will include western science and local culture in the Ming dynasty, Manchu identity and Qing expansionism, export trade art, western impact on prints, intra-Asian paintings, and visions of the "East" in the global art world. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE2056. Museum studies workshop (6 credits) This course aims to give students an introduction to the principles and practises of working in an art museum. The course will be conducted by curatorial staff of the University Museum and Art Gallery. Students majoring in Fine Arts will be given first preference, but other students fulfilling the prerequisite may apply. Any students wishing to apply for admission to FINE3004 in their third year should take this course in their second year. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: FINE1001 or FINE1004 or FINE1006 or FINE1008. 56 THIRD YEAR The following courses are open only to third year students and will be taught in a seminar format except for FINE3007. FINE3004. Museum studies internship (6 credits) The internship will allow a limited number of students to work with senior staff of the University Museum and Art Gallery or other art institutions in Hong Kong on a project relating to professional museological or curatorial practice.Admission will be by interview. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: FINE2056 FINE3006. Art history methodology workshop (6 credits) This course is taught in the form of seminars. It requires active participation from students, and is intended for those in their third year who have already engaged seriously with art history during their previous study. It aims to deepen students' understanding of the methods used by art historians by introducing various debates about interpretation. Students are expected to write a paper concerning an area of art history or visual culture of their own choice, in which they demonstrate their sensitivity to questions of method. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: Students should have taken at least one first year Fine Arts course, and at least two Fine Arts courses (in any subject area) in their second year. FINE3007. Independent research project (6 credits) Students with a focus of interest and the approval of a teacher may undertake independent study to produce a research paper under the supervision of a teacher. Assessment: 100% coursework. FINE3008. Perspectives in Asian art (6 credits) This seminar will focus in depth on one area of Asian art and visual culture, with an emphasis on art historical strategies. Students will prepare a seminar paper drawing on knowledge of a certain area, but will further be encouraged to demonstrate a critical approach to broader methodological and theoretical issues. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: Students should have taken at least one first year Fine Arts course, and at least two Fine Arts courses (in any subject area) in their second year. FINE3009. Perspectives in Western art (6 credits) This seminar will focus in depth on one area of Western art and visual culture, with an emphasis on art historical strategies. Students will prepare a seminar paper drawing on knowledge of a certain area, but will further be encouraged to demonstrate a critical approach to broader methodological and theoretical issues. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: Students should have taken at least one first year Fine Arts course, and at least two Fine Arts courses (in any subject area) in their second year. 57 History First-year Courses HIST1003. Information technology for historical studies (3 credits) This course will satisfy the requirements for the Information Technology component of the first-year curriculum. Students will learn a range of information technology skills within the framework of the historical discipline and will consider how best to apply information technology developments both critically and creatively in the pursuit of their historical studies. Students will be exposed to a variety of learning situations, especially workshops in computer laboratories. Students enrolling in HIST1003 must also enroll in another history course in the same semester. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST1008. The world at war (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) By the end of 1941, the entire world was engulfed in war, a war from which the world would emerge in ruins and permanently altered. This course surveys the origins and the course of the Second World War. Here we will examine fascism, national socialism, and German and Japanese expansionism policies. Much attention will focus on the military struggle between 1939 and 1945: tactics, strategy, and major battles. Then we will also examine the occupation policies of the New Order, collaboration and resistance, mass bombings, social change, the concentration camps and the Holocaust in some details. The course will conclude with an analysis of war-time diplomacy, which was the origins of the Cold War. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST1010. An introduction to European history and civilisation (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to the development of European civilization from its earliest beginnings in the Fertile Crescent through the classical age of Ancient Greece, and the Roman Empire, to the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. Selected highlights from these topics will be treated in the lectures and seminars and coursework assignments will seek to establish linkages between modern western civilization and its historical foundations. This course is valuable for history students, but should also appeal to others studying literature, art, music or philosophy. It will be especially useful for European Studies Majors. All students are welcome. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST1012. From imperial to colonial: nineteenth century Hong Kong (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course starts with looking at Hong Kong under Qing rule. It then goes on to examine the impact of British colonialism on this tiny outlying Chinese territory. Attention will be given to the colonial administration, the social scene, and the economic development of the new British colony until the end of the nineteenth century. Assessment: 100% coursework 58 HIST1013. Doing history (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course teaches basic methods of historical research to students who intend to be history majors in their second and third years. Lectures will introduce the context in which have developed the methods that historians use to study documents, process information, organize information, and write historical papers. Seminars will investigate each of these topics in detail. Lectures and seminars will take place in the first 5 weeks of the semester. At the end of the semester, mentoring sessions focusing on the process and final production of a portfolio will guide students as they write an essay for any other 6unit history course. Students enrolling in HIST1013 must also enroll in another 6-credit history course in the same semester. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST1014. The early modern world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course offers a broad historical survey which aims at introducing students to the various interactions between the major civilizations of the world from the time of the European Renaissance until the early phase of the Industrial Revolution. The geographical coverage of the course will include Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa and the Americas. The course will adopt a comparative approach where possible and will be particularly concerned with the theme of globalisation. This course does not aim to be a comprehensive survey of all aspects of the history of the early modern world, but it does range widely in attempting to acquaint students with important developments in the areas of culture, religion, politics, society, and the world economy. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST1015. Foundations of modern China: Dimensions of Qing history (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course starts with a series of survey lectures that cover political, institutional, social, economic, intellectual, and diplomatic trends from 1644 and 1912. These survey lectures will be followed by an in-depth study of two particular themes of Qing history, to be decided each year by the teachers who lecture this course. The historical significance of early, mid, and late Qing will be highlighted. Learning will be facilitated by the use of a web-based "electronic textbook". Students will be required to write an essay, do a document study, and work as a team on a project related to Qing history. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST1016. The modern world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course focuses upon providing a broad, non-specialized introduction to the nineteenth and twentieth-century world, and assumes no previous historical training on the part of its clientele. It will be organized around such themes as: industrialization, liberalism, conservatism, socialism, communism, nationalism, the impact of major wars, revolutions, the rise and fall of fascism and communism, the decline of the Western empires, the growth of popular democracy, urbanization, globalization, the changing status of women, cultural and environmental change. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST1017. Modern Hong Kong (6 credits) 59 (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a broad historical survey of Hong Kong from the late Qing Dynasty until recent times. It explores the history of this Chinese city and former British colony from several angles: Chinese history, British colonial history, world history, and as a place with its own identity. The goals of the course are to introduce you to the history of Hong Kong; to introduce you to the ways historians have approached this history; and to help you think, read, and write analytically and critically. Assessment: 100% coursework Second and Third Years SURVEY COURSES. Survey courses will normally be offered by the Department of History in alternate academic years. Students should consult the Department of History Office to find out which surveys are to be offered each year. CHIN2225. History of the Ming period (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the dynastic history of China from the fourteenth century to the seventeenth century. Assessment: 100% coursework CHIN2226. History of the Qing period (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course deals with the dynastic history of China from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2003. Twentieth-century China, Part I: from revolution to revolution, 1900-1949 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the political, social, economic, intellectual and diplomatic history of China from the last decade of Manchu rule to the Communist victory in 1949. Attention will be drawn to the historical forces of continuity and change, and to the themes of nationalism, modernization, militarism, democracy and revolution. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2004. Twentieth-century China, Part II: from revolution to modernization, 1949 to present (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the consolidation of Communist power, the dynamics and constraints of revolutionary ideology, and the PRC's quest for modernization and great-power status. Attention will be drawn to the Chinese Communists' methods of thought and work, and to the historical forces of continuity and change. 60 Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2005. History of Hong Kong, Part I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Beginning with the pre-British situation, the course proceeds to examine the establishment of colonial rule, the development of Chinese social institutions such as the Tung Wah Hospital, the emergence of Chinese revolutionaries led by Sun Yat-sen, the anti-colonial boycotts culminating in the general strike of 1925-26, and the events leading up to World War II. Throughout, emphasis is placed on thematic and interpretive concerns. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2006. History of Hong Kong, Part II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the extraordinary development of Hong Kong after World War II. Hong Kong's relations with China, rapid industrialization in the 1950's and post-industrialization in the 1980's, the interdependence of real estate and financial development, immigration and cultural identity, social problems and riotous disorders, contrasts between modernization and westernization are major thematic concerns. Emphasis will be placed on developing interpretive understanding of historical events. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2008. Meiji Japan, 1868-1912 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The Meiji leadership centralized Japan after centuries of decentralization. This course attempts to assess the quality of the leadership, identify the problems of centralization, analyze the effectiveness of the solutions, and appraise Japan's achievement at the end of the period especially in terms of its international standing. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2009. Modern Japan since 1912 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a general survey of the domestic political, economic, and social history of Japan since 1912. Some of the developments covered will be industrialization, changing systems of international relations (including World War II and the subsequent Allied Occupation), and rapid political change and economic growth in the postwar era. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2011. Nineteenth-century Europe, Part I: 1780-1850 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) 61 The modern Spanish philosopher Jorge Santayana once declared: `Those who do not know the past are forever condemned to repeat its errors'. Many of the characteristics of contemporary Europe have their origins in the nineteenth century: urbanization and industrial change; rapid and misunderstood social development; the centrality of Germany; nationalism, which threatens to pull apart nations and the multi-national empire of Russia; new alliance patterns that are not so new; revolutionary political change; the development of a true civil society; and the threat from ultra-right-wing populist groups. In this course we will cover European developments from the origins of the French Revolution through the Revolutions of 1848. Major topics discussed will include the Industrial Revolution, the `isms' such as liberalism, conservatism, and nationalism, the Revolutions of 1848, and foreign affairs. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2012. Nineteenth-century Europe, Part II: 1850-1914 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Many of the characteristics of contemporary Europe have had their origins in the nineteenth century. Today Europe has to deal with several of the problems World War I either failed to resolve or in itself caused. In this course we will cover European developments from the unifications that transformed Central Europe up to World War I. Major topics will include the second Industrial Revolution, socialism, social and cultural changes, reaction to those changes (anti-semitism and proto-fascism), imperialism, nationalism and liberation movements in Eastern Europe, fin-de-sicle Europe, the decline of the multi-national empires, and the origins of World War I. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2013. Twentieth-century Europe, Part I: The European Civil War, 1914-1945 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This period can be seen as a Thirty Years' War fought over the problem of Germany, beginning with the First World War, 1914-18, and climaxing with the total defeat of Germany at the end of the Second World War, 1939-45. Tensions between the Great Powers were exacerbated by new ideologies such as Fascism, Nazism and Communism, which appeared in Europe as part of a general crisis in Western Civilisation after the First World War. An attempt will be made to evaluate the debate between different schools of historians on what Fascism, Nazism and Communism signified. Finally one of the main aims of the course is to describe, and explain, the mass murders involving the deaths of millions carried out by a new breed of leaders such as Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2014. Twentieth-century Europe, Part II: Europe divided and undivided, 1945-1991 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) After the Second World War, Europe was divided into two camps, with Germany itself split into Western and Communist portions. The survey of the Western camp will focus on British, French and West German politics, social change, student revolts, and the growth of the consumer society and mass culture. In studying the `Other Europe', the course will concentrate on the way Communism evolved and changed in the Soviet Union and its Eastern European empire, concluding with the dramatic popular revolutions that so suddenly toppled the Communist regimes in Eastern Europe in 62 1989 and the even more momentous collapse of Communism in the former Soviet Union in 1991. As the pace of change in the whole of Europe increased so dramatically in 1989, the course ends with a series of questions. What are the prospects for European unity, economically and politically? What role will the new unified Germany have in Europe? What are the prospects for Russia and the other republics that have emerged from the ruins of the Soviet Empire? Students studying this course would find Part I: The European Civil War, 1914-1945 very useful. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2015. The United States before 1900 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is a general survey history of the United States from the colonial era up to 1900. Emphasis will be primarily on the nineteenth century. Key areas of focus include: industrialization and economic growth, urbanization, frontier communities, immigration, slavery, the Civil War, socio-political reform movements, and the Spanish-American War. This course is continued by The United States in the twentieth century, though the two courses can be taken separately. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2016. The United States in the twentieth century (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course continues the survey of United States history begun in The United States before 1900, though it can be taken separately. It traces the United States' response to its adjustment from an agrarian, small-scale society to a large-scale, urban, industrialized nation, characterised by large organizations. Concurrently, it covers the development into a global power with interests throughout the world. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2018. The foreign relations of China since 1949 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course studies the development of China's foreign relations after 1949 with reference to historical influences, ideological premises and practical political, strategic, and economic considerations. Special attention is given to the interaction between theory and practice in China's foreign relations, the evaluation of the impact of China's foreign policy on international politics and vice versa, and the assessment of the major approaches to the study of the topic. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2021. Nineteenth century Russia, 1800-1905 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course surveys developments within the Russian Empire from the duel between Alexander I and Napoleon through the Revolution of 1905, the dress rehearsal for the Revolution of 1917 which destroyed Tsarism. This course focuses on internal developments, rather than on foreign policy; and thus includes topics such as Slavophilism vs. Westernizers, the tsarist reaction, and then reform under Nicholas I and Alexander II, the revolutionary movement from the Decembrists to the Bolsheviks, 63 industrialisation, the Nationalities Question, and the peasantry before and after Emancipation. This course requires no prior knowledge of European history. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2024. A century of business in Hong Kong, 1842-1949 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course traces the business history of Hong Kong after it became a British colony until the Communist Takeover of China in 1949. The topics covered in the course include Hong Kong as a centre of opium trade, the development of Western businesses, the mode and practice of Chinese businesses such as the Nam Pak Hong, relations between Western and Chinese businesses, the impact of Chinese nationalism, the world wars, the Great Depression, and communist control in China on Hong Kong business. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2025. British Hong Kong and China 1895-1945 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course follows the development of the relations between British Hong Kong and China from 1895 to 1945. On the one hand, it was a relation of confrontation, with Chinese governments increasingly using the slogan of anti-imperialism as a political weapon against foreign powers. This affected China's policies towards Hong Kong. On the other hand, it was a relation with benefits for both sides. When China was in political turmoil, people from the mainland migrated to Hong Kong. This had significant effect on Hong Kong's economic and cultural developments. This course analyzes the interaction between these two seemingly contradictory relations, with special emphasis on the rise of the position of the Chinese in the colony. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2026. Interpreting Japanese history through movies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will view films, mainly Japanese and some Western, and study the interpretations of Japanese history and tradition present in the films. In addition to being a historiographic exercise, the course will examine popular attitudes toward the past. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2027. The foundations of international trade and finance in the modern world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The modern economic world of international trade and finance is the result of developments which took place in Europe from the early Renaissance through to the Industrial Revolution. This course will examine the foundations of these developments focusing particularly on the pre-modern industrial base of Europe, the change in European trading patterns from a Mediterranean to an Atlantic dominance during the Renaissance, the growth of banking and other financial institutions in the early modern period, and the role of urbanisation as a background to the major economic advances which 64 took place during the Industrial Revolution. This course is open to students from all faculties. Assessment: 75% coursework, 25% examination HIST2031. History through film (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course looks at the manner in which film has portrayed events in history, considering the degree to which film can enhance or be detrimental to our understanding of history. Students may expect to gain some appreciation, not just of the films themselves, but of the degree to which any movie is the product of a certain historical period and reflect its values and preoccupations. This course should be particularly enlightening to students who taking other United States history courses and American Studies majors. Students are expected to produce one term paper, a comparative study of at least two films, to participate in class discussions, and to make at least one presentation in class. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2034. An Introduction to the history of education in Hong Kong (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course will provide students with the opportunity to relate educational developments in Hong Kong to contemporary opinion and other socio-economic pressures. It has been designed to introduce students to the perspectives, methods, and resources of history as they can be applied to educational matters and not merely to present a set of non-dispute-worthy "facts" about past Hong Kong schools. As such, it is essentially a form of social history. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2035. The Bauhinia and the Lotus: Culture and history of the two SARS (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Prior to the Opium War, Macao was the major theatre for the first encounter between China and the West. After Hong Kong had been ceded to Great Britain by The Nanjing Treaty, Hong Kong soon replaced Macao as the centre for Sino-Western cultural and technical interchange. Even though before 1997 and 1999 both Hong Kong and Macao were under the administration of Western countries, both have remained a predominantly Chinese society with their own unique heritage and history. The aim of this course is to introduce to the student the development of Hong Kong and Macao's history and cultural heritage. It emphasizes the role and function of Hong Kong and Macao history in modern and contemporary Chinese history and its cultural interactions with the West. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2037. Germany between the two World Wars: The rise and fall of Adolf Hitler (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The inter-war years between 1918 and 1945 were a time of traumatic upheaval in the history of modern Germany. After World War I freedom and democracy in the Weimar Republic were threatened by nationalism, fascism, socialism and communism. These pressures were intensified by economic tensions and high unemployment rates. The miserable conditions contributed to the rise of 65 the Nazis and Adolf Hitler, an extreme nationalist who wanted a reawakened, racially united Germany to expand eastward at the expense of the Slavs. After finally seizing power in 1933, Hitler installed a totalitarian state wiping out all democratic institutions. The Nazi persecution of the Jews and occupation, exploitation and domination of much of continental Europe in World War II became one of the blackest chapters in the history of Europe. With the fall of Berlin and the suicide of Hitler in 1945, the German people were able to gain freedom and democracy again. In our course we will not concentrate on Hitler alone but study the outcome of World War I and the revolution of 1918-19 on the mentality of the German people, consider the problems of the fledgling Weimar Republic, and discuss the era of fascism in Germany and Italy, the nazification of culture and society, the Holocaust, and German aggression against Europe in World War II. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2038. Germany, 1871-1990: From unification to reunification (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Germany, the largest country in Western Europe, needed a long time to build up a sovereign national state and to develop a common national identity. After the unification was achieved in 1871, internal and external political struggles led the country in two devastating wars in 1914 and 1939. Following the Second World War two independent German republics, controlled by their respective superpowers USA and USSR, developed into a capitalist and communist society. Reunification was finally achieved in 1989/90 by the collapse of the Soviet power in Central Europe. The course surveys the most important developments within the German Imperial Empire, the Weimar Republic, Nazi Germany, and the Federal Republic and German Democratic Republic. We will study topics such as conservatism, liberalism, nationalism, imperialism, and socialism, the two World Wars, and concentrate on the developments and changes of the different political and economic systems in modern German history. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2039. War and peace: Conflicts and conflict resolutions since 1945 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) War is an extension of politics. True or false? The objective of the course is to understand a) the nature of military conflicts, war and warfare and b) the ways and means of maintaining and keeping peace without resorting to war. In-depth case studies of major conflicts and conflict resolutions will be provided. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2040. Life in Tokugawa Japan, 1603-1868 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Tokugawa society was colourful, interesting, multidimensional and full of energy. The period witnessed great urban expansion and advancement in rural technology. Students will enjoy looking at the ways of life of Tokugawa lords and merchants living in the great cities and castle towns, and that of the peasants in the countryside. The rich cultural life of the period also makes fascinating study. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2042. The history of sport (6 credits) 66 (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course will focus on the development of modern sport in Europe (with a strong British focus), and develop historical themes of class, gender, age, `race' and locality. Particular emphasis will be given to the history of sport in relation to themes such as nationalism, empire and public health, in addition to the role of the state, the media and business in shaping and controlling the nature of contemporary sport. In brief, the course examines how and why sport has been located at the interstices of gender, race and class and has produced, and been generated by, multiple and contested social identities. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2046. The modern European city: Urban living and open spaces (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). Over the past century and a half, the majority of Europeans have become urban dwellers. On an individual, civic, national and international level, every aspect of social life has been influenced by this evolution. Consequently, the study of cities provides a powerful perspective upon European history. An essential part of the process of urbanisation involved the allocation of urban open spaces to specific social and cultural functions. A key focus for public and private life, the city's open spaces parks, gardens, streets and squares had a fundamental influence upon the nature of urban living. As those in positions of power influenced the provision and purpose of these areas important developments in European social, economic, cultural and political life were linked closely to the evolution of open spaces in cities. In this course the changing use and allocation of urban open spaces and the evolution of meanings of public and private space will provide a lens through which the development of modern European cities will be analysed. The importance of open spaces will be addressed with recourse to a number of key themes, including the `greening' of cities of the nineteenth century, the construction of ideal Fascist and Socialist cities in the 1930s, functionalism and post-war reconstruction, and the `sustainable city' of the 1990s. By the end of the course the students will not only be more familiar with historical approaches to urban `space' but will also have received an introduction to the evolution of European cities and the changing cultural importance of public and private open spaces. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2062. From empire to EU: Culture, politics and society in twentieth century Britain (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). The course explores British politics, culture and society from the eve of World War I to the dawn of the third millennium. We will analyze and seek to understand some of the fundamental transformations that have occurred over the last century examining a number of prominent themes, including party politics, Britain and Europe, empire and decolonisation, and domestic social transformations. Additionally, we will look closely at how the fortunes of different social groups evolved across the period, focussing in particular on ethnic minorities, women and young people. This will be an issues-based course, exploring themes of 20th century British history in relation to the wider European context and exploring how they have had an impact on the nature of British and European society today. The subject matter of the course will be shaped around the study of the evolving political system, the effect of industrial (and post-industrial) change on contemporary society, and the relationship of Britain to its former empire, to Europe, and the rest of the world. Assessment: 100% coursework 67 HIST2063. Europe and modernity: cultures and identities, 1890-1940 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). In this course we look at key social and cultural aspects of European `modernity' in the nineteenth and twentieth century, exploring in particular the way Europeans from all kinds of backgrounds were defined and defined themselves in relation to work, leisure, race, gender, regions and cities. We look at the impact of new forms of cultural expression such as advertising, cinema, sport and leisure, as well as the identities (of age, class, gender, race and ethnicity) which Europeans adopted and rejected in their pursuit of ways of belonging within the cultural parameters of urban modernity. In relation to this we will consider expressions of enthusiasm for `the modern,' as well as outbursts of dissatisfaction or irritation with modern civilization, expressed not just in aesthetic forms but also in violence against those identified as `outsiders.' Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2064. Sweat and abacus: Overseas Chinese in Southeast Asia (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). This course provides a broad survey of Chinese business development in Southeast Asia from the 15th century until modern times. Through four key themes of migration, diaspora, entrepreneurship and network, this course traces the evolution of the Chinese business communities overseas and examines the growth and expansion of their networks in Southeast Asia. The social, economic and cultural aspects closely associated with the Chinese business history, such as early Chinese migration, dialect organizations, guilds, occupational structure, Chinese merchant culture, as well as the transformation and globalization of Chinese business will also be discussed. Students will be provided with an opportunity to understand the growth of Chinese business in Southeast Asia from a historical perspective. They will also have the opportunity to examine Chinese migrant and business experiences in a comparative sense with case studies being drawn from various countries of the region. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2065. Workshop in historical research (6 credits) The research skills and methodologies used by historians are based on the critical analysis of primary and secondary sources. Competency in these skills and an acquaintance with the various methodologies of the historian are central to advanced studies in the historical discipline, but these skills and methodologies are also highly transferable to the workplace. In this course, students will work in small groups on a research project. Learning will be through directed group discussions and coordinated individual research tasks. The course will introduce students to a wide range of historical sources, equip them with the skills to analyse and interpret those sources, and will also encourage students to develop leadership and team-work roles in solving real historical problems. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2066. Narcotic culture: A history of drugs (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). 68 The course will examine the global history of psychoactive substances from roughly the sixteenth to the twentieth century with special emphasis on opium in China. The first sessions will trace the spread of tobacco, tea, coffee and alcohol across the globe after the fifteenth century, before the uses of opium in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries are elucidated in greater detail. We will also look at the rise of semi-synthetics, including morphine, heroin and cocaine, in the early twentieth century. The emphasis will be on the social dimensions and cultural meanings of substance use, as we look at context and consumption rather than at questions of policy and supply only: the intricate and diverse ways in which drugs interact, collude and even collaborate with human beings in a range of diverse social contexts give psychoactive substances their particular historical interest. The rise of prohibition in the twentieth century will be critically examined in the light of new scholarship, in particular in the case of China, where the anti-opium campaigns constituted the cornerstone of a growing international movement against `drugs'. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2067. Sex, gender and modernity in China (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). This course is designed to provide the student with the basic knowledge necessary to assess the different theories and problems of gender history and sensitively and electrically to apply these skills to the China-field. We will concentrate on the first half of the twentieth century, although frequent excursions will be made into the late imperial period in order to question the presumed disrupture between `tradition' and `modernity'. As the course adopts a comparative perspective, it will also provide specific examples from European history, with an emphasis on France and England. A number of case studies will be critically examined in order to highlight the strengths and pitfalls of gender history. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2068. The intellectual history of twentieth-century China (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). This course follows the thematic approach, with attention paid to both the intellectual leaders and the intellectual developments in China during the twentieth century. The leaders include Liang Qichao, Cai Yuanpei, Chen Duxiu, Hu Shi, Li Dazhao, Lu Xun, Gu Hongming, Lin Shu, Liang Shuming, Tao Xisheng, Chen Yinke, Chen Lifu, Xiong Shili, Zhang Wentian, Qian Mu, etc. The discussion of the intellectual waves focuses on such themes as traditionalism, cultural conservatism, liberalism, westernization, modernization, and Marxism. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2069. The history of American popular culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). From its inception as a nation, the people of the United States have been educated and entertained via modes of vernacular or popular culture. This course moves chronologically from the 18th century to the present looking at various expressions of popular culture as they developed and gained in popularity among the American public. As the course progresses, we will look for connections between popular culture in the U.S. and Asia, particularly in Hong Kong. Drawing on diverse samples of historical evidence (newspapers, magazines, advertisements, circus and vaudeville playbills, political cartoons, radio and television programs, films, and Internet materials, etc.) we will 69 explore difference and common ground between various historical eras and their use of popular culture. Issues to be considered include: The definition of popular culture; Connections between popular culture and the construction of national identity, race, class, gender, ethnicity, and religion; The significance of popular culture in processes such as Americanization/globalization; The importance of looking historically at the way popular culture helps shape and is shaped by particular events. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2070. Stories of self: History through autobiography (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). Autobiographies stories of self have been published in all cultures for centuries and they are still very popular today. In the recent past, autobiographical narratives have become a powerful tool for authors who wish to express their individuality, interrogate and transcend cultural constraints, protest political oppression, heal childhood wounds, run for public office, or pay the rent. Historians looking for "evidence" of the past contained within the autobiography face a variety of fascinating (and often complex) issues. This course, designed for students who are interested in links between autobiography and history, explores the following questions: What can autobiographies teach us about the past? What are the uses/pitfalls of using autobiographies for purposes of historical research? How has the autobiographical form changed over time? What are the links between memory and identity (gender, ethnicity, religious background, caste/class, etc.) in various autobiographies? What how are autobiographies shaped by/reflections of culture? How do historians approach autobiography differently from scholars in other fields? During the term students will read, write, and critique various autobiographical narratives. Text selections will be drawn mostly from the U.S., Hong Kong, and China. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2071. Joseph Stalin: His life, policies and historical assessment (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). This course will focus on the life and policies of Joseph Stalin, leader of the Soviet Union from 1929 up through 1953. He is one of the most significant figures, not only for Russian and European history but for the entire world. His policies impacted on all countries. On a possibly positive side there was the "Stalin Revolution", which made Russia an advanced and powerful industrial state, able to withstand the Nazi juggernaut. On the negative side, there was the Great Purges, and forced migration of entire peoples. Through repression, Stalin made the Soviet Union into one of the world's most tightly controlled societies, and the course will examine how and why this occurred. The German invasion of the Soviet Union made Stalin a Generalissimo, and the course will examine Stalin as a Commander of Soviet forces. After the war Stalin contributed to causing the Cold War, and the course will examine how and why. Another section in the course will cover the issue of whether or not there was a Stalinism, and whether it directly resulted from Marxism-Leninism. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2072. A history of modern European warfare (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). This course will survey the evolution of modern warfare through the study of selected episodes in European (an Europe's two extensions Russia/Soviet Union and the United States) military, naval, 70 and aerial history from the dynastic and commercial wars of the eighteenth century, the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, the limited wars during the nineteenth century, the colonial wars, World War I, World War II, the proxy wars during the Cold War, Korea, Vietnam, through the war in Iraq earlier this year. While emphasis will be given to the larger conflicts, such as the two World Wars, attention will be given to less familiar but still important conflicts, such as the Crimean War, the Boer War, the Russian Civil War, the Spanish Civil War, Algeria and Palestine, and the Afghan Wars. The topics discussed will include causes of wars, technological changes, military strategies and tactics, social and economic changes, genocides, intelligence and espionage, and the use of ideology and propaganda in the conduct of warfare. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2073. Prussia in the age of absolutism and reform, 1648-1815 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). Brandenburg-Prussia and the Hohenzollern Dynasty dominated the period of German history between the end of the Thirty Years' War and the French Revolution. Under the Great Elector and the Prussian Kings, Prussia became a military and political power within Europe, demonstrating its strength in many European wars. It also practiced mercantilism, religious toleration and an enlightened absolutism. The reign of King Frederick the Great (1740-1786) is marked by wars, economic initiative, and promotion of Enlightenment ideas. Prussia's capital Berlin became a European centre of science and culture in those years. During the Napoleonic period, the country was able to start a reform movement that paved the way to a modern German nation state. The course will be organized around such themes as: political rivalries and wars in the 17th and 18th centuries; economic, social and intellectual changes in early modern Europe and their effects on Brandenburg-Prussia; mercantilism; enlightenment; absolutism and enlightened absolutism; religious toleration; promotion of sciences by academies; the development of Berlin and Potsdam as royal residences; the defeat of the Prussian army by Napoleon; the Prussian Reform Movement of Stein and Hardenberg; and the war of liberation. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2076. Germany and the Cold War (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). During the Cold War period, Germany was divided into two independent states for more than forty years: The western-oriented Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the eastern-oriented German Democratic Republic (GDR). Under the auspices of the respective superpowers, USA and USSR, the Bonn and the East Berlin governments developed their own political and economic systems but also a distinct way of life in society and culture. In the international scene, the FRG was a founding member of the European Communities and became one of their staunchest supporters, while the GDR found itself reduced to satellite status inside the Soviet-dominated Eastern Bloc. The `German Question' remained open until the sudden downfall of the socialist-communist East Berlin regime in 1989 and the peaceful reunification in 1990, events, which also marked the end of the Cold War in Europe. The course will not only treat Germany as a case study of the Cold War period but will also deal extensively with important phases, milestones and persons in the history of the divided country in a comparative approach. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2077. Eating history: food culture from the 19th century to the present (6 credits) 71 (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes). This course is an introduction to selected aspects of the study of food culture through historical analysis. We will discuss examples of food preparation, distribution, marketing, and consumption from the early 19th Century to the present. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2078. Renaissance Europe 1453-1648 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The Intellectual upheavals of the Renaissance and Reformation changed the cultural and religious outlook of the whole European continent and opened the way for the emergence of the modern European state. This course therefore begins by considering the classical background to the Renaissance in Europe and seeks to explain how the intellectual changes of the fifteenth and earlysixteenth centuries contributed to the awakening of religious dissent in the 1520s. These developments are placed in the context of the general political history of the period and the course traces their impact through to the end of the Thirty Years' War. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2079. Early Modern Europe 1648-1789 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines a crucial period of European history in which the emergence of the modern state, the birth of capitalism, and the expansion of European influence into the American and Asian hemispheres laid the foundations of the modern world. While the course concentrates primarily on political changes in Europe between the Thirty Years' War and the French Revolution, considerable attention will also be paid to social, economic and cultural developments in this period. This course therefore provides a backdrop to the events of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries which have helped to shape modern Europe. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2085. The history of modern sexual identity and discourse (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will focus on two `new sciences' arising in the late nineteenth century that have shaped the modern understanding of sexual behaviour sexology and psychoanalysis. It will look at some of the key thinkers who pioneered sexology such as Havelock Ellis, Edmund Carpenter, Richard von Krafft-Ebing, and Maria Stopes alongside the acknowledged founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud. It will investigate primary sources in sexual science that have been subject to censorship and not generally available, until recently, for comparative study with Freudian discourse. Though the texts of sexology and psychoanalysis often start from different premises, all have been instrumental in the development of modern sexual language, assumptions and practices. It will contextualize their collective thinking by considering the impact of the emergent women's movement, of Darwin's evolutionary theory, of urban culture, and of secular modernity. It will study the historiographical debate (particularly among gay and feminist theorists) as to whether these early investigators of sexology and psychoanalysis formulated progressive or repressive, revolutionary or conservative definitions of sexuality. It will explore the far-reaching consequences that these thinkers have had on attitudes to the body and people in the form of reproductive control, eugenics, race, homosexuality, the `woman question,' and the politics of sexual identity. Assessment: 100% coursework 72 HIST2086. Bismarck: The Iron Chancellor (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Otto von Bismarck, a member of the Prussian nobility, began his political career as a conservative deputy in the Prussian diet, became Minister-President and served as Chancellor of the new German Empire. He is regarded as one of the leading European statesmen in this time. During his life span from 1815 to 1898, dramatic upheavals in political, constitutional, economic and social history took place in Prussia and in other parts of Germany, which had a deep impact on European history in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Therefore, the course will not deal with Bismarck's personality and career stations alone but will study the German Confederation and the German Empire, the Revolutions of 1848-49, the Unification Wars with Denmark, with Austria and with France, German domestic and foreign policies since 1871, and major developments that led into the First World War. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2087. The Vietnam Wars (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Indochina, in particular Vietnam, had been under French control as either a full colony or a protectorate since the late nineteenth century. During World War II, the Japanese occupied Indochina, an occupation that spurred the Vietnamese to resist continued French colonial rule. From 1945 on, for the next thirty-years, Vietnam was engaged in a series of wars. In this course, we shall examine these various wars and their significances: decolonization and the French War, 1945-1954; the Cold War which featured the American involvement in Vietnam with all its bitter repercussions; a Civil War between a Communist North and a "capitalist and free" South; the War at Home - repercussions in the US and elsewhere; and the Fall of South Vietnam, Peace, and Reconciliation as a new Vietnam formed. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2088. From Communism to Capitalism: Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union after 1980 (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Since 1980, the once perceived unchanging Communist Empire stretching from Berlin to Vladivostok has been gripped by huge, revolutionary changes--politically, economically, socially and culturally. In this course we will first examine the causes for these changes, including the Prague Spring in 1968 and the Dissident movement within the Soviet Union. Then we will examine Communist attempts at reform, including "Goulash Communism" in Hungary, and most significantly, the advent of Mikhail Gorbachev with his twin policies of Perestroika and Glasnost in the Soviet Union. The failure of reforms and repression all from above, as seen in Poland's declaration of martial law in December 1981, caused Revolutions to erupt first in Eastern Europe in 1989, and then in the Soviet Union itself in 1990 and 1991. By the start of 1992, Communism crumbled everywhere in Europe. People embarked on a revolutionary transition in all fields of life and commerce. We shall examine how successfully this transition has proved throughout Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and what the implications of this unprecedented change have meant for the region and for Europe as a whole. Assessment: 100% coursework 73 HIST2091. The British Empire (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the British Empire from the late eighteenth century to the end of the twentieth century. The British Empire once spanned so much of the globe that it is impossible to understand the history of the modern world (including Hong Kong) without considering the role of this empire. Topics include the cultural and material foundations of empire; the economic, political, and social consequences of empire; the relationship between metropole and colony; collaboration and resistance; the dynamics of race, gender, and class; the relationship between empire and art, new national and local identities; decolonization, independence, and nation-building; and the contemporary legacies and implications of empire. The goals of the course are to introduce you to the history of the British Empire; to introduce you to the ways in which historians have approached this history; and to help you think, read, and write analytically and critically. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2092. The United States and Asia (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a survey course covering U.S. relations with Asia, focusing largely on the twentieth century, but reaching back earlier. Topics covered include: Principles of American foreign policy; the early U.S. China trade; the U.S. and the opening of Japan; the U.S. acquisition of Hawaii; the Spanish-American War, 1898; the Open Door Notes and the Boxer Rebellion; U.S. Policy, Asia, and World War I; the Washington Conference System; U.S. Policy in the Philippines; the Coming of World War II; World War II in Asia; the Occupation of Japan; the U.S. and the Chinese Civil War; the Korean War and U.S. Pacific Strategy; the U.S. and Decolonization in Asia; the Vietnam War and Its International Context; Japanese and Korean Economic Revival; Richard Nixon's Opening to China; U.S. Responses to Tiananmen Square; the Impact of the Ending of the Cold War; the Effect of 9/11 and the War on Terror; U.S. Pacific Strategies in the Late Twentieth and Early Twenty-First Centuries. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2093. International history in the era of two World Wars (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course explores the history of international relations from 1914 to 1945. It aims to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the causative factors that drove international politics in this crucial period of the twentieth century; to offer a firm basis for more advanced work in history and international relations; and to provide the factual grounding and conceptual apparatus necessary to understand the contemporary world. Assessment: 100% coursework SEMINAR COURSES Except for the Theory and Practice of History and the Dissertation elective, the seminar courses listed may not be offered every year. Students should consult the Department of History Office to find out which Seminars are to be offered each year. CHIN2235. Sources and methodology (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) 74 This course intends to provide a thorough training in research methodology related to the study of Chinese history. The ideas of noted ancient and contemporary Chinese historians will be drawn on. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of reference works and information search through internet. Assessment: 100% coursework GEOG2060. An introduction to archaeology (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) How do you know where you are going until you know where you have been? This course will introduce students to the role archaeology has played in the construction of humanity's history and prehistory. It is intended to be a broad survey of the discipline, its discoveries, scientific and analytical tools and applications. The course will assist students in recognizing new cultural dimension within the landscape around them and provide a sound basis for further study here or abroad. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination HIST2032. Case studies in women's history: Hong Kong and the U.S. (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This seminar course will explore themes and issues in women's history/gender history in the 19th and 20th century. By focusing on Hong Kong and the U.S., students will work within a comparative framework to explore difference and common ground between societies and selected historical periods. Topics include: varieties of women's reform movements, gender and World War II, and gender and economic transformation in the late 20th century. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2048. The history of young people in modern Europe (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Responses to and representations of young people provide a valuable insight into the values of the society and the culture which generated them. The aim of this course will be to compare changing experiences of growing up with evolving representations of the life-stages used to identify the young (childhood, adolescence and youth) in nineteenth- and twentieth century Europe. It therefore considers what it has meant to be young in different times and places. Through comparison of experiences and representations the course will reconsider the validity of terms used to describe the young, highlight the social, political and cultural motives for advancing different roles and representations young people and generate a broad insight into regional patterns of similarity and difference in the European history of this demographic group. This course aims to teach students the importance of the historical context in shaping young people's lives by addressing variables such as class, gender and race. It will also introduce students to a variety of different methodological and theoretical approaches to the topic. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2052. Social issues in Hong Kong history (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) 75 Based on the reading and analysis of documentary sources, this course will explore social problems such as the survival of Chinese customs, poverty, social mobility, housing, immigration and emigration, and professionalization during Hong Kong's colonial period. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2053. The Cold War (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course focuses upon the emergence and development of the Cold War in the 1940s and 1950s. It takes into account the new scholarship based on evidence from former Soviet, Eastern European, and Chinese archives since the early 1990s. Students are expected to make extensive use of documentary sources. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2074. Historical studies using computers (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Computers and information technology play an increasingly important role in historical research and teaching. This course will take up a problem in contemporary history and investigate it using information technology to the fullest extent. The course is run in conjunction with a course taking place at The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, USA, and most classes will use internet video conferencing so that teachers and students at W&M and HKU can continuously interact. The course offers a range of skill-learning opportunities for students who intend to pursue historical studies at advanced levels. It will also be valuable to students who wish to teach history in the schools where information technology has become common under government initiatives. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2075. Directed reading (6 credits) The aims and objectives of this intensive reading course are to provide the opportunity for students to pursue a specialized topic with a faculty member. Throughout the semester, the student and teacher will consult regularly on the direction of the readings and on the paper or papers (not to exceed 5,000 words) that will demonstrate the student's understanding of the material. This course cannot normally be taken before the fourth semester of candidature and subject to approval by the Head of the School of Humanities on the recommendation of the departmental Undergraduate Coordinator. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2080. Classroom across the Pacific: American history and anthropology (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will study aspects of American history, culture and anthropology. Like HIST2074 Historical Studies Using Computers, this course is an internet-based classroom: all lectures will use internet video conferencing and other technologies to link classrooms and students at HKU and The College of William and Mary. At the end of the teaching period, HKU students will take a field trip to the United States to complete research projects through cooperative field work with their American counterparts. The students will conduct independent research projects in consultation with each other on an issue of central focus relevant to American history and culture, to be determined each year. 76 Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2081. Gender and history: Beauty, fashion and sex (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) How do societies define what it means to be a man and a woman? Everyone, whatever their age, sex or social status, has an opinion on this issue, even if this is not always articulated consciously. Often, in fact, ideas about gender - the relations between the two sexes - are assumed to be `natural' or `normal' and timeless. However, by analysing the question of what being a `man' and being a `woman' means at different times and in different places this course sets out to illustrate how these identities are socially constructed. HIST2081 aims to introduce students to the various ways through which scholars have sought to understand gender over time. Beginning with the earliest efforts to write `women's history,' selections from the recent deluge of historical writing and new research on gender will be highlighted. The topics to be covered will include beauty norms, dress reform, prostitution, women's suffrage, the impact of War on constructions of manhood and womanhood, permissiveness in the `swinging' sixties and so on, down to the present day. A comparative geographical focus will be used, and the course will draw on a wide variety of material from the Early Modern period to the 21st Century, to facilitate the study of changing gender norms. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2082. Europe and its other (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of European perception and understanding of nonEuropean peoples and cultures from the 18th 20th centuries. The objective of the course is to show how Western representations of non-Europeans were shaped by the various political debates, scientific theories and colonial ideology that dominated European societies of the time. The course uses the conceptual frameworks and methodologies of history and cultural studies to analyze a wide range of primary materials that include visual documents, travel narratives, fiction, scientific texts, philosophical treatises, and documentaries. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2083. Gender, sexuality and empire (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course investigates the ways in which concepts of gender and sexuality have been used in British and French imperial discourse during the 19th and 20th centuries to manage their relationships with the colonized peoples and to showcase the superiority of European civilization. Part one of the course examines how the male colonial identities were constructed through the sexualization of the colonized subjects while the second half of the course focuses on the multiple roles of European women in the colonies. The course uses the conceptual frameworks and methodologies of history and cultural studies to analyze different types of historical narratives ranging from archival documents, personal memoirs and correspondence, travel accounts to autobiographical texts. Assessment: 100% coursework 77 HIST2084. Sexing the spirit: The history of the modern feminist challenge to Christianity (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Surveys of mainstream feminism have generally omitted the subject of faith. They have taken as a given wholesale feminist hostility to Christianity and have concluded that religion has little importance in the life of modern women. Recent global events are a reminder however that religion remains a passionate if volatile force in contemporary culture and politics. This course will consider a history that has been overlooked the critical engagement of modern feminism with Christianity. The course will begin with two mid-twentieth century events that have proved to be crucial catalysts in the active feminist response to Christian religion. The first was the ordination of Florence Li Tim Oi as the first Anglican woman priest in Hong Kong in 1944. The second was Simone de Beauvoir's publication of The Second Sex in 1949. Li's courageous war-time decision to pioneer female entrance into the all-male clerical establishment constitutes a reformist engagement with Christianity, while De Beauvoir's rejection of Christianity as a patriarchal institution oppressive to women reflects a more radical and uncompromising stance. Their two positions can be read as representational of the compatibility/incompatibility, reform/revolutionist debate that feminists have had with Christianity since the rise of second wave feminism in the 1960s. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2089. History's Closet: Clothing in context (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) What we wear reflects our individual and collective histories as well as our sense of style. Clothes offer a glimpse into the age and place in which we live. Building on recent work in cultural history and studies of material culture, this seminar course will consider how bodies have been adorned in diverse historical contexts. We will pay attention to the way modes of dress and design reflect political ideology, nation, culture, gender, religion, class, and ethnicity. Looking for continuity across and ruptures within historical periods, students will examine various types and styles of clothing in the social/historical contexts in which they were made and worn. Adopting a thematic rather than chronological approach, students will participate in weekly discussions of topics ranging from childhood fashion in the Middle Ages to hip-hop style in 20th century. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2090. The Great Famine (1959-61) (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of famine through a sustained investigation of the Great Famine in China from 1959 to 1961. From a comparative perspective, the student will be introduced to a series of historical debates on the definition, causation and nature of famines with specific reference to some of the major famines of the nineteenth and twentieth century, including the Great Irish Famine of 1845-8, the Great Bengal Famine of 1943-4 and the Great Ukrainian Famine of 1932-22. From a methodological perspective, the student will work with a wide range of primary and secondary sources on the Great Famine in China (1959-61) in order to develop specific skills of documentary analysis and historical interpretation. While the seminar will look in detail at the nature of the famine and its political, economic, social and demographic dimensions, we will try to get closer to an understanding of the famine as it was experienced from the bottom 78 up: how did ordinary people cope with hunger and death on such a large scale? A grassroots approach will lead us to consider not only a variety of experiences among victims and survivors across the social spectrum, but also a number of methodological issues on the use of primary sources, the nature of memory and the making of official historiography. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2094. Museums and history (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Museums have become one of the most popular ways of telling history. Yet many scholars argue that museums are not neutral places; rather, they are often used for a wide range of strategic purposes: regulating social behavior, building citizenship and national identity, and expanding state power. But museums also face a variety of constraints and challenges: culture, money, politics, physical space, locating and selecting appropriate artifacts, and forming narratives. This course considers these issues by looking at history museums and heritage preservation in Hong Kong. Course format: twelve lectures; seminars, and visits to local museums. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2095. The World Wars through documents (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course focuses upon the two world wars. It aims at helping students to assess and analyze critically different types of documents generated in the process of war, and to enhance their ability to handle original sources. It is taught as a seminar course, with students required to attend one lecture and one seminar per week. The course focuses upon a variety of documentary materials, including: official reports; public statements; speeches; newspaper and media reports; propaganda; letters; diaries; memoirs; and oral histories. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2096. The history of European business in China (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The termination of the East India Company's monopoly on British trade with China in 1834 provoked a flow of European goods and capital into the Chinese market. Since then foreign enterprises of different forms were operating in various business sectors of China under the strong influence of political and economic factors that shaped European-Chinese relations from the 18th century until the beginning of the Communist era in 1949. In Hong Kong, an international merchant community including Chinese, Europeans, Americans, and Japanese, were active in developing this British colony into a flourishing entrept facilitating trading with and investment in China. This course intends to provide a long-term historical perspective and will examine the structure and organisation of European, particularly British, German, and French business in China including Hong Kong, explore the links between European business and European diplomacy, and look to the impact of European business on China and the response of China. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2097. Mao (6 credits) 79 (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The aim of this seminar is to critically examine existing accounts of the life of Mao Zedong, whether he is portrayed as a great revolutionary, a paranoid tyrant or a mass murderer. We will do so by exploring not only a variety of secondary sources, including texts, images and films produced by historians, but also by looking at some of the primary sources which have been used in biographies of Mao Zedong, for instance his own writings, interviews with journalists, reminiscences by contemporaries and key documents from the campaigns he instigated, in particular the Anti-Rightist Campaign, the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution. Using Mao as a case study, the student will be introduced to historical debates on the significance of key events such as the Long March and the Great Famine, but also on historiographical issues such as biographical writing, the nature of official memory, the notion of totalitarianism, and state-society relationships. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2098. A history of modern Taiwan (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This seminar course examines the political and economic processes that have shaped Taiwan as a part of China until 1895, as Japan's first colony and as the Republic of China on Taiwan since 1949. In particular, the course surveys the evolution of Taiwanese political and economic development and scrutinises the conditions that allowed the process of democratisation to take place on the island and its geopolitical and social consequences. It examines Taiwan's relations with its two key partners, China and the United States, and accounts for the dynamics in this triangular partnership. Finally, the course looks at Taiwan's place in global economy and international relations. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2099. Themes in the history of the post-Cold War world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This seminar course introduces students to the major developments in the post-Cold War history of the world. It breaks down the historical period around the Cold War, post-Cold War and post-9/11 eras and considers specific issues, themes and case studies to broaden students' understanding. The lectures and seminars will present information on the patterns of change in the major policy domains that have dominated recent history and influenced contemporary decision-makers and societies. The course places an emphasis on historical events between the first and third worlds, as these events often led to dramatic shifts and changes in contemporary international relations. Moreover, the course looks at various historiographical debates over the nature of historical interpretation of socio-political trends and does not treat history as a series of discrete `facts' but seeks to contextualize the theoretical basis of different historical viewpoints and how these contribute to our understanding of post-Cold War diplomatic history, war and society. The course covers a broad range of areas that include the `causes' of the end of the Cold War, the Middle East and international oil wars, East Asia's economic miracle, the rise of China, European unification, ethnic strife in post-communist Europe, the third wave of democratization and post-9/11 political and military developments. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2100. Eating history: Intensive seminar in food culture (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening 80 purposes.) This course is an intensive seminar introducing students to selected aspects of cultural history through a focus on history and food. Because this is a broad and relatively new field, we will use a thematic rather than chronological framework. We will also introduce texts and theoretical perspectives from other disciplines as they intersect with the historical research we are considering. The objectives of the course are: to study eating habits, food preferences, and culture in various historical periods; to reflect on individual, familial, and community eating customs in order to connect micro and macro historical contexts through autobiography and oral history research; to cultivate an understanding of material culture (cookbooks, food, cooking utensils) as cultural history; and to develop critical reading, thinking, and writing skills. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST2101. History's closet: Intensive seminar (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third-year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) What we wear reflects our individual and collective histories as well as our sense of style. Clothing becomes part of material culture and it tells us something about the time and place in which we live. Drawing from recent work in cultural history and studies of material culture, this intensive seminar course will consider how bodies have been adorned in diverse historical contexts. We will pay attention to the way modes of dress and design reflect political ideology, nation, culture, gender, religion, class, and ethnicity in the 19th and 20th centuries. Looking for continuity across and ruptures within historical periods, students will examine various types and styles of clothing in the social/historical contexts in which they were made and worn. Objectives of the course are: To introduce students to cultural history/material culture through the discussion of fashion and clothing; to study clothing as a historical text, learning to see continuity and contrast across various periods; to nurture critical thinking, speaking, and writing skills; and to learn to see connections between individual decisions about apparel and a larger cultural/historical context. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST3015. The theory and practice of history (6 credits) (This course is open to third-year students only.) This course aims to acquaint students with some of the theoretical and practical considerations which underlie the study and writing of history by considering the development of the discipline of history from its beginnings in the ancient world through to the postmodernist critique. The course is especially recommended to those who wish to pursue history at the postgraduate level. All students taking the Dissertation elective are required to take The theory and practice of history. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST3017. Dissertation elective (12 credits) (This course is open to third-year students only.) This is a research course which requires submission of an extended written dissertation. All students taking the Dissertation elective are required to take The theory and practice of history. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST3022. History by numbers: quantitative methods in History (6 credits) (This course is open to third-year students only.) 81 This course seeks to introduce students to the various quantitative approaches used by historians in their research and to provide an opportunity for students to learn to use some of these methodologies in a workshop environment. Its focus is therefore both theoretical and practical, and students will learn skills which will be readily transferable to the workplace. This course is available only for History majors in their final year of study. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST3023. History research project (6 credits) (This course is open to third-year students only.) Students who wish to undertake a research project on a specialized historical topic in either semester of their final year of study may enroll in this course with the approval of the Head of the School of Humanities on the recommendation of the departmental Undergraduate Coordinator. The course aims at providing an opportunity for intensive research leading to the production of a long essay (not exceeding 7,000 words) which will be supervised by a faculty member with expertise in the chosen area of study. This course is open only to History majors and minors. Assessment: 100% coursework HIST3024. Writing Hong Kong history (6 credits) This course looks at various approaches to Hong Kong's history from the late Qing Dynasty until recent times. Rather than focusing on the history of Hong Kong, we will look at the ways in which historians have dealt with certain themes, issues, and problems. Thus we will be less concerned with dates and facts than with analysis and interpretation. The goals of the course are to introduce you to the ways in which historians have approached Hong Kong's history; and to help you think, read, and write analytically and critically. Assessment: 100% coursework Linguistics First-year Courses Students must pass the first year course, LING1001. `Introduction to linguistics', before they are admitted to any second and third year courses in the department. LING1002. Language.com is designated as an IT-integrated course. Students who do the course can use it to fulfill the university's IT requirement. LING1001. Introduction to linguistics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a prerequisite for all courses taught in the department, and a requirement for all students majoring in linguistics. It is an introduction to the basic topics of linguistics: the nature of human language, speech sounds and sound patterns, word formation, sentence structure, and the study of meaning and use. Students will learn about the general structure that underlies all language as well as the great variety of existing human languages. The course gives plenty of practice in solving problems, analysing languages, including Chinese and English, and dealing with data. 82 Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination LING1002. Language.com: Language in the contemporary world (3 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course is designated as an IT-integrated course. Students who do the course can use it to fulfill the university's IT requirement. The 21st century will be the Age of the Internet. What is the Internet all about? Essentially, it is about information and communication. Language is by far the most important means of communication and information exchange amongst human beings. To fully appreciate our own place in the contemporary world and to make the best of the many opportunities presented by new forms of communication, we need to know more about language. This course is an introduction to language: its nature and its relationship with facets of life in the contemporary world. Natural Language Processing: Can computers be trained to understand and produce human language? Machine Translation: Can computers do translations automatically and accurately? Corpus Linguistics: What kinds of language data are available on the Internet? How can they be used to make grammars and dictionaries? Chinese Language Computing: How many kinds of Chinese inputting methods are there? Which one suits you best? Internet Tools: What tools are available on the Internet for the learning of languages and linguistics? Human-Computer Interfaces: What is "ergonomics"? What is currently being done to improve the quality of communication between people and their computers? Speech analysis: What computer programs are available to analyse speech signals? How can computer speech analysis help language learners? As this course may include topics relating to Chinese Language Information Processing, students who have no prior knowledge of Chinese characters are advised against taking this course. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING1003. Language, thought, and culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) Students majoring in linguistics are required to take both LING1001 and this course. It offers a survey of the study of language, with a focus on the relationship between language structure on the one hand and thought and culture on the other. It is designed as a complementary course to LING1001 `Introduction to Linguistics', and covers topics which cannot be dealt with in the other course due to the limitation of time. Through reading and participation in regular discussions on a selection of topics, students will gain a deeper understanding of the ways in which language is structured, learned, processed and used. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination Second- and Third-year Courses All courses have LING1001. `Introduction to linguistics' as their prerequisite and are taught as onesemester courses. Course availability is subject to staffing considerations. LING2001. Computational linguistics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) 83 How can the computer help us analyse sentences? Can a computer really understand language? These are some of the questions explored in this course. The course will introduce basic concepts and techniques of natural language understanding and Chinese language information processing. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2002. Conversation analysis (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) How is it that we manage to have conversations in which lots of different people take part and everyone has a chance to speak as well as to listen? At least, most of the time we manage that all right. What rules are followed when we have conversations? On this course you will discover what these rules are and learn how to describe the structure of conversations. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2003. Semantics: meaning and grammar (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course focuses on structural and cognitive aspects of meaning which are relevant to the description and theory of grammar. Examples will be drawn from Cantonese, Mandarin and English together with some other European and Asian languages. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2004. Phonetics: describing sounds (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course focuses on articulatory phonetics; the speech mechanism; the description and classification of sounds of languages; sounds in context; prosodic features; tone and intonation; and practical work. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2009. Languages of the world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This survey of the world's languages covers how languages are classified into families and types as well as issues of linguistic diversity and endangered languages. The course involves regular practical work. The course satisfies the prerequisite for the advanced course, Language typology, and also provides useful background for all courses in linguistics. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2010. Language and dialect (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) In this course you will learn about the difference between a standard language and a dialect, with particular reference to Modern Chinese and British English. 84 We shall study the writing systems of Modern Chinese and British English, and compare them with alternative systems which are used for Chinese and English dialects. You will learn to distinguish between `Chinese' and `Putonghua', between `Cantonese', `Guangdong speech', and `Yue dialects', and between wenyan and baihua; similar phenomena in British English will also be discussed. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2011. Language and literacy in the information age (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims at helping students gain an understanding of the role of language and literacy education in the socio-economic development of many societies. After the introduction of basic concepts in sociolinguistics and in literacy, we will compare linguistic situations in selected parts of the world and then take up major issues such as multilingualism, literacy education, including definitions and types of literacies, language planning policies, and how to integrate linguistic and educational issues in development projects. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2012. Experimental phonetics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) The theoretical and instrumental study of the acoustic properties of speech sounds; classificatory criteria; speech analysis and synthesis; experimental techniques; and laboratory work. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2013. Language typology: the study of linguistic diversity (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) A survey of the structural diversity of the world's languages. Topics covered include: notions of language type; morphological, case marking, and word order typology; diachronic and areal typology; universals of language and their explanation. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2018. Lexical-functional grammar (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) An intensive introduction to the architecture of Lexical-Functional Grammar, with a discussion of how this syntactic theory addresses issues such as levels of representation, lexical integrity, complex predicates, serial verbs, optimality, and the syntax - semantics interface. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2022. Pragmatics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) 85 An introduction to the study of Pragmatics. Topics include: linguistic meaning, speaker intention, interpretation and understanding, context, deixis, reference, conversational implicature, inference, presupposition, speech acts, politeness, relevance theory. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2023. Discourse analysis (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) An introduction to Discourse analysis. Topics include: linguistic forms and functions, speech and writing, discourse topic, discourse structure, information structure, cohesion and coherence, knowledge representation. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2024. Lexicology and lexicography (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) An introduction to Lexicology and lexicography. Topics include: kinds of unit in the lexicon, lexical entries, lexical relations, lexical semantics, the mental lexicon, application of lexicology to dictionary compilation in various languages. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2025. Corpus linguistics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) An introduction to Corpus linguistics. Topics include: the use of corpora in linguistic analysis, methods in the design and collection of spoken and written texts, uses of corpora. Topics are discussed with reference to various languages. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2027. Phonology: An introduction to the study of sound systems (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) The notion of the phoneme and its place in phonology; distinctive features; phonological processes and their description; rules and representations. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2030. Morphological theory (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) Current models of morphology, including Lexical Morphology, Word and Paradigm Morphology, Prosodic Morphology, and other models. Assessment: 100% coursework. 86 LING2031. Phonological theory (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) Current theories of phonology, including Autosegmental Phonology, Metrical Theory, Lexical Phonology, Optimality Theory and other models. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2032. Syntactic theory (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) The course explores recent theoretical approaches to syntax, focusing on generative grammar. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2033. Contrastive grammar of English and Chinese (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) In this course we will compare the grammar of English and Chinese. We will find some surprising similarities as well as interesting differences. You will have a firmer grasp of the structure of both languages by the end of the course. In addition, you will be in a better position to undertake bilingual research or to become effective language instructors or translators. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2034. Psycholinguistics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course is an introduction to psycholinguistics and will examine issues concerning how language is acquired and processed in the mind. Essential concepts of the mental processes involved in language comprehension and production and contemporary research will be covered in this course. There will also be practical laboratory classes. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2036. Child language (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) The focus of this course is on language acquisition, including a consideration of the stages of language development, biological basis, language disorders, dyslexia, and the differences in learning to speak and read in Chinese and English. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2037. Bilingualism (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a general introduction to the study of bilingualism from a psycholinguistic perspective, 87 with emphasis on various aspects of bilingual behavior, such as code-switching and language mixing. Age-related differences, the influence of the first language, the role of attitudes, motivation and learning contexts will be examined. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2038. Historical linguistics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the principles of historical linguistics and the methods linguistics use to describe and account for language change. The emphasis is on sound change; however, morphological and syntactic changes are also discussed. The language data to be examined are mainly from the Indo-European language family and Chinese dialects. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2039. Language variation and change (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) The course introduces the students to language variation and its implications in the discussion of language change in progress. It also covers the general principles involved in language change as well as the problems of the initiation and transmission of language change. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2040. Languages in contact (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) No language develops in isolation and all show some effect of contact with other languages. The course will introduce basic concepts in language contact, distinguishing phenomena such as codemixing and lexical borrowing, language shift and substrate influence. It will then focus on the most striking cases of "contact languages" pidgins and creoles and the challenges and opportunities they present to linguistics. The course is especially relevant for those studying French and will feature audio-visual materials illustrating contact languages such as Singapore Colloquial English, Macau Portuguese creole and Haitian French creole. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2041. Language and information technology (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course continues with major themes from LING1002. Language.com and aims to create a greater awareness of the growing importance of language information processing methods. The objective of the course is to explore the interface between language, linguistics, and information technology. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2042. Educational linguistics (6 credits) 88 (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course is preferably taken after LING2011. Language and literacy in the information age and examines how linguistic and literacy issues impact educational systems in various parts of the world. The course aims to lead students to an understanding of the cognitive and social underpinnings of the interface between language, literacy and education. Prerequisite: Language and literacy Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2043. Language and animal communication (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines communication systems amongst animals, including bees, apes, parrots and dolphins, against the background of human language. The course also explores the question of whether it is possible for animals to learn human language. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2044. Language and culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) The aim of this course is to explore the relationship between language and culture. Topics include language and thought, language and religion, language and nationalities, language and social changes. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2045. Writing systems (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) An introduction to the major writing systems of the world. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2046. British linguistics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a study of the major contributions to linguistic description and theory made by British linguists from the later part of the 19th century to the end of the 20th century. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2047. Optimality theory (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces current issues in Optimality Theory, with reference to phonology, morphology, and syntax. Assessment: 100% coursework. 89 LING2048. Language and cognition (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines various issues regarding cognition and language. Topics to be covered are: How is language processed and represented in the mind and the brain? Commonalities and particularities of cognitive and neuro-cognitive processing of different languages (e.g., English and Chinese). First and second language learning. What are the critical factors that facilitate language learning? The Chinese language and the brain; language and reading disorders. Applied cognitive psychology of language. Headline designs for newspaper, TV program, and advertisement. Cognitive basis of persuasion. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2050. Grammatical description (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims at giving the student a comprehensive introduction to basic concepts used in the description of morphology and syntax, independent of any model of grammar. Exercises accompany the topics introduced. Example analyses are drawn from various languages. The following topics in morphology and syntax will be covered: words, morphemes and morphs, word classes, immediate constituents, phrase structure, functional relations, sentence structure.. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2051. French syntax and universal grammar (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) An overview of the major aspects of French Linguistics will be provided in this course. The basics of morphology, semantics and syntax will be covered, with emphasis on the syntactic component of the course. Students will learn how to analyze French sentences in formal perspectives, using the basics of grammatical frameworks such as Lexical Functional Grammar and the Principles and Parametres approaches. Prior knowledge of introductory linguistics and French grammar are helpful but not essential. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2052. Swahili structure and universal grammar (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) Swahili is the most widely spoken African language and one of the most intensively studied in many universities in Africa, Europe, and North America. In this course, an overview of the major aspects of Swahili and Bantu Linguistics will be provided. The basics of phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics will be covered, with emphasis on the morphosyntactic component of the language. Students will learn how to analyze basic Swahili sentence structures from formal perspectives, using the basics of grammatical frameworks such as Lexical Functional Grammar and the Minimalist approaches. Prior knowledge of introductory linguistics and spoken Swahili are helpful but not essential. Assessment: 100% coursework. 90 LING2053. Language and the brain (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course is an introduction to the representation and processing of language in the human brain, the systems and processes that enables us to speak, understand speech, learn languages, and read and write. Through attending the course, students will acquire in-depth knowledge of how language is developed, processed, and organized in the brain. Traditional as well as most recent research from linguistics, cognitive neuroscience (e.g. brain imaging) and the study of language disorders will be reviewed. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2054. Language and social interaction (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) Many social actions are accomplished through talk. This course introduces students to recent studies of social interaction and language use in a variety of social and institutional contexts. Distinctive features of institutional interaction are identified and discussed with reference to ordinary conversation. Implications of the analysis of institutional talk for our understanding of language and social interaction will also be considered. Assessment: 100% coursework. LING2055. Reading development and reading disorders (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to provide a deep understanding of reading development and reading disorders in different written languages. Through attending the course, students should be able to understand how different cognitive processes contribute to the development of skilled word reading and text comprehension and what possible problems children may encounter during the course of reading development. Effective treatment and instruction approaches will also be discussed. Assessment: 100% coursework. Third-year Courses All courses have LING1001. `Introduction to linguistics' as their prerequisite. LING3002. Extended essay (6 credits) This is a course for individual research on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with staff, in preparation for possible postgraduate work and is offered for third year majors only. Students intending to study this course are required to attend an interview at the beginning of their third year to give a short presentation on their proposed topic. The thesis which should normally be 8,000 words in length, should be submitted before the end of December. There is no written examination but an oral exam will be required. 91 LING3003. Linguistics field trip (6 credits) This is a required course for students majoring in Linguistics or Human Language Technology. The field trip is technically designated as a Third year course but actually begins to be taught in the second year. Students majoring in Linguistics should plan their courses with this in mind. The aim of the course is to provide an opportunity for students of linguistics to have first-hand experience with languages as they are spoken and used in particular settings, and to carry out an empirical investigation on some aspect of a language `on-site' (e.g. structural, cognitive, socio-cultural, or technological aspects of a language). The field trip is the best way of putting knowledge about language structure and use into practice, and forms an essential part of a linguist's training. To satisfy the requirements of the course, students should (1) participate in a two-week field trip outside Hong Kong (e.g. to China, Europe, or Africa), led and supervised by members of staff; (2) carry out an empirical investigation of a linguistics topic in consultation with their supervisors; and (3) write up and hand in a report upon return from the field trip. Assessment: Attendance in the pre-trip course, participation in the field trip and a written report. Assessment All courses taught in the department except LING1001 and LING1003 are assessed by 100% coursework. Coursework assessment may take a variety of formats, including projects, term-papers, essays, portfolios, class tests, and student presentations. Major in Linguistics Students majoring in Linguistics must take LING1001 Introduction to linguistics, and LING1003 Language, thought, and culture in their first year. They must also take LING2004. Phonetics: describing sounds and LING2050. Grammatical description normally in their second year and LING3003. Linguistics field trip in their third year. In addition, they must take a minimum of 30 credits in their second and third year of study from the following list of courses: LING2001. LING2002. LING2003. LING2009. LING2010. LING2011. LING2012. LING2013. LING2018. LING2022. LING2023. LING2024. LING2025. LING2027. LING2030. LING2031. LING2032. LING2033. Computational linguistics (6 credits) Conversation analysis (6 credits) Semantics: meaning and grammar (6 credits) Languages of the world (6 credits) Language and dialect (6 credits) Language and literacy in the information age (6 credits) Experimental phonetics (6 credits) Language typology: the study of linguistic diversity (6 credits) Lexical-functional grammar (6 credits) Pragmatics (6 credits) Discourse analysis (6 credits) Lexicology and lexicography (6 credits) Corpus linguistics (6 credits) Phonology: An introduction to the study of sound systems (6 credits) Morphological theory (6 credits) Phonological theory (6 credits) Syntactic theory (6 credits) Contrastive grammar of English and Chinese (6 credits) 92 LING2034. LING2036. LING2037. LING2038. LING2039. LING2040. LING2041. LING2042. LING2043. LING2044. LING2045. LING2046. LING2047. LING2048. LING2051. LING2052. LING2053. LING2054. LING2055. LING3002. Psycholinguistics (6 credits) Child language (6 credits) Bilingualism (6 credits) Historical linguistics (6 credits) Language variation and change (6 credits) Languages in contact (6 credits) Language and information technology (6 credits) Educational linguistics (6 credits) Language and animal communication (6 credits) Language and culture (6 credits) Writing systems (6 credits) British linguistics (6 credits) Optimality theory (6 credits) Language and cognition (6 credits) French syntax and universal grammar (6 credits) Swahili structure and universal grammar (6 credits) Language and the brain (6 credits) Language and social interaction (6 credits) Reading development and reading disorders (6 credits) Extended essay (6 credits) Music First Year Courses Level 100 courses MUSI1001. The language of music (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is open only to non-majors, is an introduction to the main elements of music melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, timbre, and articulationas they occur in traditional, classical, and popular musics of the world. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI1004. Introduction to musics of the world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is open to all students, introduces a range of music from throughout the world including North America, Southeast Asia, West Africa, the Caribbean, and Europe. Genres such as salsa and zydeco (United States), gamelan gong kebyar (Bali), bawa and highlife (Ghana), djembe (Senegal), son and rumba (Cuba), samba (Brazil), flamenco (Spain), and rembetika (Greece) are examined in their social, cultural, and historical contexts. The course also discusses issues raised by cross-cultural research. Practical performance in a department ensemble may be included in the course. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI1006. Music technology (3 credits) (This course fulfills the Information Technology requirement, and is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) 93 This course, which is open to all students, is a hands-on introduction to the use of music technology including music notation, sequencing, synthesizer techniques, and digital audio. Technical methods of information access, especially in the Music Library, are introduced. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. MUSI1011. Orchestral studies and techniques 1 (for students in their first year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Students participate in weekly rehearsals and performances with the University's orchestra over two semesters. Besides musical skills, this course focuses on teamwork, discipline, and creativity. To gain admission to the course, students must pass an audition and have reached the standard of ABRSM Grade 6 or equivalent on one of the following: violin, viola, cello, double bass, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, trumpet, trombone, tuba, or percussion. Assessment: 100% practical examination (and conductor assessment). MUSI1014. Aural skills (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A student completing this two-semester course will have reinvented what it is to listen, and will be able to translate what is heard into other forms of communication. The course concerns rhythm, pitch, and timbre of many kinds of music. It develops practical skills such as rhythmic memory, imitation, dictation, sight-singing, and identification/classification. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI1016. University choir 1 (for students in their first year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is open to all first-year students, focuses on musical performance. Students participate in weekly rehearsals and performances with the department's University Choir over two semesters. Besides musical skills, this course focuses on teamwork, discipline, and creativity. Assessment: 100% practical examination (and conductor assessment). MUSI1017. Performance workshop 1 (for students in their first year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Students may choose to enroll in any workshop offered by the Music Department, or take individual instrumental instruction with a teacher approved by the department over two semesters. Beginners are welcome, but places in this course are limited, especially for individual instrumental instruction. Except with the permission of the Head of the School of Humanities on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Coordinator of the department, Performance workshop 1 is open only to students taking a major in music. Please check with the Music Department for details. Assessment: 100% practical examination (and instructor assessment). MUSI1018. Advanced music performance 1 (for students in their first year of study) (6 credits) Students prepare a recital of 30-40 minutes under the supervision of a vocal or instrumental teacher approved by the department. At least one piece must be performed on a period instrument, or must use 94 either period or advanced twentieth-century techniques, as appropriate. Places in this course are limited and admission is by audition. Except with the permission of the Head of the School of Humanities on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Coordinator of the department, Advanced music performance 1 is available only to students taking a major in music. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI1019. Fundamentals of tonal music I (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course begins with fundamental music materials, such as scales and keys, and moves rapidly into species counterpoint and voice-leading principles of diatonic harmony. Student completing this course are expected to have established a clear and solid understanding of rudiments of tonal music, and be able to make practical demonstrations of this knowledge. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI1020. Fundamentals of tonal music II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) A continuation of MUSI1019 Fundamentals of tonal music I, this course explores further into tonal procedures. It begins with the use of seventh chords, and will progress to basic chromatic harmony. Contrapuntal gestures and simple formal structures such as binary and ternary forms will also be introduced. Students completing the course are expected to have attained a thorough understanding of the function and voice-leading principles of diatonic and simple chromatic harmonies, and be able to analyse simple forms and contrapuntal textures. Prerequisite: MUSI1019. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI1021. Western music history 1: from ancient Greece to the Renaissance (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course traces the development of European music from its earliest beginnings in ancient Greece and Rome through the flowering of sacred and secular music in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The course is meant to introduce students to a number of ideas, practices and works representative of the period between ca. 800 AD and 1600. A strong focus is placed on the introduction of the fundamental aspects of music theory and the analytical study of scores through listening and reading. In addition, we focus on the ways in which music relates to the other arts and the social contexts in which it was created. Assessment: 100% coursework. Second and Third Years Courses Level 200 courses MUSI2004. University gamelan 1 (for students in their second year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is open to all students, focuses on Balinese gamelan or 'orchestral' performance, specifically the gamelan gong kebyar. No previous musical experience is necessary. Students participate in weekly rehearsals with the gamelan over two semesters, and by the end of the course students will be expected to know how to play the main melody, the main supporting parts, and the 95 interlocking (kotekan) parts of selected compositions. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in public performances. Assessment: 20% coursework, 80% practical examination (and instructor assessment). MUSI2006. Analysis of orally transmitted musics (6 credits) This course will focus on the description, transcription, and analysis of music that is essentially orally transmitted. Issues such as 'emic' and 'etic' transcription, prescriptive and descriptive notation, and various methods and theories of analysis will be discussed. Music from a variety of cultures, including musical cultures of Asia, will be used as examples for study. Prerequisite: MUSI1004. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2009. Topics in Asian music history (6 credits) Selected topics in the history of Asian musical cultures will be examined. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2010. Music of China (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course presents the essential features of the music of China, its role in Chinese culture and history, and its position in world music. Subjects will include the qin and other musical instruments, theatrical genres such as kunqu, Peking opera and Cantonese opera, narrative songs such as Peking drum song, Suzhou tanci, and Cantonese nanyin, folk songs, and music in Confucian, Buddhist, and Taoist rituals. The course aims not only to introduce students to traditional Chinese music, but also to explore the nature of Chinese culture through its musical practices. Important works of Chinese music will be introduced, as well as issues such as change/stasis, politics/aesthetics, theory/practice, literati/masses, professional/amateur, ritual/entertainment, home-grown/foreign-influenced, and Han/Minority. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2013. Computer and electronic music (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course provides students with a general knowledge of acoustics, sampling, sound design, sound editing, sound recording and mixing, audio-visual synchronisation, synthesiser techniques, and MIDI sequencing. The course comprises lectures, workshops and individual studio exercises. Students are required to produce various practical, creative projects using the Music Department's studio equipment and computer programs. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. MUSI2015. Popular music: from Cantopop to techno (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) 96 This course covers a wide variety of popular musics ranging from the latest trends in the global market to locally produced music such as Hong Kong's Cantopop. The course surveys the development of key genres of popular music, in particular, those from the United States, such as blues, country, rock and roll, Motown, soul, hard rock, disco, hardcore, heavy metal, grunge, techno, and rap. In addition, the course examines themes and concepts that can be applied to the serious study of popular musics beyond those discussed. These themes and concepts concern the ways in which popular music is defined, produced, disseminated, and consumed across the world. Students will learn the basic critical tools to examine popular music from a scholarly perspective. Lectures are augmented with videos, film slides, and recordings. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2016. Music of contemporary Hong Kong (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is open to all students, aims to promote an understanding of the various styles of music practised in contemporary Hong Kong. Through comparison with the musical landscapes of other modern societies (e.g., US, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan), we shall endeavour to understand music and ourselves better. Topics to be discussed may include technical analysis of selected musical works, procedures of musical production, and a look at radio programmes, the recording industry, film music, high-art, jazz, new-age, and alternative musics, as well as traditional local and popular idioms. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2018. Understanding music (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is open only to non-majors, and is designed for students with little or no background who wish to learn of music's beauties, ideas, and meanings. Music can be seen both as formal ideas in abstract arrangements, and as rapturous emotion rising from the heart. This course will explore both aspects by introducing musical works from many cultures, ranging from the grandeur of a Beethoven symphony to the subtleties of the Chinese zither. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. MUSI2019. Music in society (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is open only to non-majors, and is designed for students with little or no background who are interested in music as a social activity. Discussion of music in tribal cultures, popular music and its cultural meanings, political musics, and social patterns of performance, consumption, and communication are explored. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2026. Fundamentals of music composition (6 credits) This course seeks to provide an understanding of various musical techniques through writing music. It covers topics in notation, instrumentation, melodic writing, harmonization, timbral control, expansion and refinement of raw material, and structural design. The course comprises lectures, small-group 97 tutorials, individual supervision, composer/performer workshops, and concert performances of student works. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2027. Composing for the concert world (6 credits) This course encourages students to write music using 20th-century techniques. It introduces students to organising and manipulating various musical parameters such as pitch, rhythm, meter, texture, colour, form, etc. It also helps students to experiment with the incorporation of extra-musical inspiration and alternative aesthetics. Prerequisite: MUSI2026. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2028. The business of music (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to basic arts administration concepts with a focus on the business of music. Topics to be discussed include strategic planning, organization, marketing, fundraising, financial management, arts law, as well as arts provision and arts policies in Hong Kong as compared to models in China, Europe, and the USA. The lectures provide the students with theoretical foundations of management for the performing arts, and various assignments help students to develop practical skills in writing, communication, critical thinking, and analysis. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2029. Chinese music history (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces the history of China through an examination of selective source material including bells from the bronze period, the Book of Music attributed to Confucian philosophy, the earliest known musical notation of a composition from the sixth century A.D., major encyclopaedic compilations of musical sources from the Song dynasty, and Mao Zedong's 'Talk on Literature and Art' in 1942. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2030. Composing for the commercial world (6 credits) This course helps students to write music that works for a given practical application such as film scores, theatre music, multimedia performances, radio and television commercials, Web pages, newage music, and popular songs. Students are required to work on topics that vary from year to year. Prerequisite: MUSI2026. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2031. American music (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) 98 This course will examine the history, genres, styles, innovations, and cultural contexts of music in America. Following an overview of its European and African roots and the development of American music up to World War I, intensive consideration will be given to jazz, rock, blues, musicals, classical, and avant-garde musics. This course is available to all students. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2032. Orchestral studies and techniques 2 (for students in their second year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Students participate in weekly rehearsals and performances with the University's orchestra over two semesters. Besides musical skills, this course focuses on teamwork, discipline, and creativity. To gain admission to the course, students must pass an audition and have reached the standard of ABRSM Grade 6 or equivalent on one of the following: violin, viola, cello, double bass, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, trumpet, trombone, tuba, or percussion. Orchestral studies and techniques 1 is not a prerequisite. Assessment: 100% practical examination (and conductor assessment). MUSI2033. Music and culture in Bali: an overseas fieldtrip (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course focuses on the study of gamelan music and its cultural context over a two week field trip in Bali. Students will spend one week in intensive workshops at the Sekolah Tinggi Seni Indonesia (STSI), the principal institution for the Indonesian performing arts in Bali, and another week participating in and observing gamelan performance in a traditional Balinese community. The course is open to students who have completed one of the following courses: (i) Aural skills, (ii) University gamelan 1, or (iii) University gamelan 2. Students will be required to produce a field work report. Assessment: 100% field report. MUSI2035. Love, sex and death in music of the ancient and modern world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines cultural and historical representations of feelings, situations, and stories that focus on passion, romance, sexuality, tragedy, and death in music. We shall consider both semiotic and formal aspects of a number of works through which such expressions can be conveyed, and shall examine their resultant power and meaning. The course covers popular and art music from the late twelfth to the twenty-first century, drawing on an eclectic range of repertoires both from the West and from other parts of the world. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2036. Audio digital signal processing (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course looks as various techniques of signal processing and algorithmic composition commonly used in computer music. Basic knowledge of trigonometry and algebra is expected, and some experience with computer programming is recommended. Students will use the tools of computer music to create simulations or models demonstrating the ideas presented in class. Students will have 99 the option to pick their own tools, including software learned in previous classes, or to use tools taught in class. We will use some or all of the following programming environments: MAX/MSP, SuperCollider, Mathematica, Csound, cmusic, C++, and Java. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2037. Directed study 1 (for students in their second year of study) (6 credits) This is a one-to-one course in which the student works with a supervisor throughout the year. During the first semester, the supervisor introduces theories and techniques of musical research through reading, discussion, and book reports. Towards the end of the semester, a research topic is to be decided upon between the student and supervisor. The second semester is devoted to the research on the topic and the writing of a thesis under the guidance of the supervisor. Entry to this course is at the discretion of the Head of the School of Humanities on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Coordinator of the department. Assessment: 100% thesis. MUSI2041. University choir 2 (for students in their second year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is open to all second-year students, focuses on musical performance. Students participate in weekly rehearsals and performances with the department's University Choir over two semesters. Besides musical skills, this course focuses on teamwork, discipline, and creativity. University choir 1 is not a prerequisite. Assessment: 100% practical examination (and conductor assessment). MUSI2042. Contrapuntal techniques (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course provides students with a comprehensive knowledge of contrapuntal techniques used in Western music. Topics include species counterpoint, free counterpoint, and 18th-century contrapuntal writing, with special reference to the style of J. S. Bach. Contrapuntal treatment in music beyond the common practice period will also be examined. Pre-requisite: MUSI1020. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2043. Orchestration (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course provides students with a comprehensive knowledge of orchestration. The characteristics of standard orchestral instruments will be studied, as well as the techniques of combining these instruments when writing for small and large orchestral forces. Aspects of psycho-acoustics will also be studied. Teaching materials will be derived from examples of the classical music repertoire and from film scores. Pre-requisite: MUSI1020. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2044. Film music (6 credits) 100 (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) What does music contribute to a fiction film? When is it used? And why is it there in the first place? Directors use music with an effect in mind and it is music's force in the "here and now" of the moviegoing experience that we will try to describe. To do so, we will study films from various cinematic traditions through the various ways in which music functions within them as a powerful meaningmaking element. Under the assumption that film is an audio-visual medium, we will examine individual works representative of different genres musicals, horrors, dramas, comedies, and cartoons. Consideration will be given to the relationship between music and image as well as music and sound as they emerge from close readings of individual scenes. We will also look at how music is represented in the story world of the film, whether a character performs, listens to, or ignores it. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2046. Performance workshop 2 (for students in their second year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Students may choose to enroll in any workshop offered by the Music Department, or take individual instrumental instruction with a teacher approved by the department over two semesters. Beginners are welcome, but places in this course are limited, especially for individual instrumental instruction. Except with the permission of the Head of the School of Humanities on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Coordinator of the department, Performance workshop 2 is open only to students taking a major in music. Please check with the Music Department for details. Performance workshop 1 is not a prerequisite. Assessment: 100% practical examination (and instructor assessment). MUSI2047. Advanced music performance 2 (for students in their second year of study) (6 credits) Students prepare a recital of 30-40 minutes under the supervision of a vocal or instrumental teacher approved by the department. At least one piece must be performed on a period instrument, or must use either period or advanced twentieth-century techniques, as appropriate. Places in this course are limited and admission is by audition. Except with the permission of the Head of the School of Humanities on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Coordinator of the department, Advanced music performance 2 is available only to students taking a major in music. Advanced music performance 1 is not a prerequisite. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2048. Music, language, and meaning (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course explores the question of meaning in music and how this is articulated in music as medium. In what ways can music be construed as a "language"? How are emotions expressed in it? Are words equivalent to musical tones and phrases, sentences? What do tones mean? Do they mean nothing but sheer pleasurable physical sensations? Or do tones refer to things external to the music itself? How does music indicate human subjectivity and act? Why do all human societies have songs and dances? Why are these associated with healing, occult, and magic in ancient societies? How is music valued and used in technologically-advanced societies? Where and how did the idea of listening to music in itself come about? What does music mean when valued as entertainment and commodity in leisure, 101 consumer societies? All these questions centre around a philosophy of music that views it as a socially meaningful sign. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2049. Music and power (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is open only to non-majors, looks into specific studies that highlight how music shapes or is shaped by power relations. It argues that the exercise of power is involved in the performance of songs and dances during events that range from playful, yet intimate, face-to-face gatherings to serious, impersonal, public rituals in advanced, complex societies. A theory of music is not just a theory of tones, but a theory of social processes that a music is about. This course will enable students to think critically about the power of music in various contexts of group relations that are not necessarily formal political in nature. Readings pertinent to the use of music in relation to gender, class, race, and ethnicity will reveal that music as power can galvanize consent, identity, conformity, and cooperation, much as it can also become a moral weapon of the weak to resist domination and oppression. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2050. Representation of the supernatural in music (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) From the very beginnings of human memory, witches, ghouls, ghosts, and goblins have played a highly significant role in the formation and continuance of stories that have attempted an explanation of natural phenomena and inexplicable cultural conventions. In Western culture, visual, conceptual, and aural embodiments of such mythological creatures have numerously appeared in sculpture, painting, literature, and music. This course, which is open only to non-majors, surveys musical representations of the supernatural throughout the ages. It will focus on a selection of eclectic musical works ranging from expressions of veiled medieval occultism to present-day cinematic productions of gothic horror, in which mythology and the supernatural continue to resonate. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2051. Rhythms of life: music and culture in West Africa (for students in their second year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to second year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is open to all students, is a performance-based introduction to West African music, in particular, the percussion ensemble. The course focuses on the music and dance of the Dagaaba and Ewe people of Ghana, in particular, the music for Gahu, a type of traditional music and dance of the Ewe people. No previous musical experience is necessary. Students will participate in 12 hours of intensive instruction during the summer and will have the opportunity to learn to play, sing, and dance Gahu. There will also be introductory lectures on the cultural context of various West African musics, including djembe, griot, highlife, juju, and mbalax. Assessment: 100% practical examination (and instructor assessment). MUSI2052. Advanced tonal chromaticism and analysis (6 credits) 102 (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a continuation of MUSI1020 Fundamentals of tonal music II, with emphases on chromatic harmonies, larger forms such as rondo and sonata, and contrapuntal genres such as canon and fugue. The basic concepts of Schenkerian theory will also be introduced. Students are required to complete a number of harmonic exercises and analytical projects. Prerequisite: MUSI1020. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2053. Post-Tonal techniques and advanced analysis (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will focus on the modern and post-tonal techniques such as modality, atonality, serialism, minimalism, aleatoric music, collage, neo-tonality, jazz harmony, etc. Analytic techniques of pitchclass set theory, transformational theory, and timbral analysis will also be introduced. Students are required to complete various analytical and technical projects. Prerequisite: MUSI2052. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2054. The piano (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course is open to all students with either some experience with, or interest in, the piano. It offers an overview of the history of the piano through a montage of lectures that focus on the personalities that were involved with it, the repertories they either composed for or performed on it, and the social and cultural milieus that provided the context for its extraordinary rise as arguably the most important instrument in the history of Western Classical music. Students will be given the opportunity to study the piano as a medium of musical exploration and expression, the occasion for the display of virtuosity, a staple of the 19th-century bourgeois home, and an object of almost maniacal veneration. The course will end with an overview of the dissemination of the piano in East Asia, with particular reference to the piano culture of Hong Kong. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2055. Chinese opera (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course starts with an exploration of the structural and theoretical aspects of Chinese Opera, including the classification of tune types, text setting, and performance practice. While examples are mostly drawn from kunqu, Peking opera, and Cantonese opera, other regional derivatives will also be introduced for comparison and analysis. The second half of this course comprises a series of reading and examination of representative operas and their performances, through which the interplay between Chinese opera and its religious, social, cultural, and political contexts is investigated. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2056. Defining the arts scene in Hong Kong (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening 103 purposes.) What is an 'arts scene'? Does Hong Kong have one? Is a 'scene' a concrete social entity? Or is it a myth, a retrospective, artificial construction by critics and historians, an abstract rationalization of random events, processes, and individual choices? This course, coordinated by the Comparative Literature and Music Departments, will attempt to answer these questions through close readings and discussions of selected works, artistic events, entities, and venues characteristic of Hong Kong's cultural life: the multiplex cinema, the Soho commercial gallery, Cantopop, the international film festival, the classical music organizations, independent cinema, Cantonese opera, the Cattle Depot Artist Village, and cyberspace. What will emerge is a fragmented, yet extraordinarily open, cultural space, one which the audience be they critics, students, amateurs, and even tourists can play a crucial role in shaping and nurturing. "Defining the arts scene in Hong Kong," then, will mean not only finding the right words and tools to understand something that already exists, but also becoming active agents in bringing its existence to a new level of self-awareness, participating in the very process of its creation. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2057. Western music history 2: from the rise of opera to Beethoven (6 credits) This course picks up from where MUSI1021 leaves off, covering the integrated instrumental and vocal idioms of the so-called Baroque and Classical periods (ca. 1600 to 1800). A strong focus is placed on the introduction of the fundamental aspects of music theory and the analytical study of scores through listening and reading. In addition, we focus on the ways in which music relates to the other arts and the social contexts in which it was created. Prerequisite: MUSI1021. Assessment: 100% coursework. MUSI2058. Western music history 3: from Beethoven to the present (6 credits) This course will focus on the Western art music tradition from around 1800 to the present, moving from the apparent stylistic perfection of the Classical era to the revolutions and restless variety of the Romantic era, and finally working through the complex experiments of 20th-century music, the relationship between "high" (classical) and "low" (popular) repertories, and the adoption of Western idioms on the part of composers in Asia. A strong focus is placed on the introduction of the fundamental aspects of music theory and the analytical study of scores through listening and reading. In addition, we focus on the ways in which music relates to the other arts and the social contexts in which music was created. Prerequisite: MUSI2057. Assessment: 100% coursework. Level 300 courses MUSI3008. University gamelan 2 (for students in their third year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is open to all students, focuses on Balinese gamelan or 'orchestral' performance, specifically the gamelan gong kebyar. No previous musical experience is necessary. Students participate in weekly rehearsals with the gamelan over two semesters and by the end of the course students will be expected to know how to play the main melody, the main supporting parts, and the interlocking (kotekan) parts of selected compositions. In addition, students will be required to demonstrate their understanding of Balinese gong kebyar musical form by composing the interlocking parts for a specified melody. For this assignment, the class will be divided into groups consisting of 104 four to six students. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in public performances. Assessment: 20% coursework, 80% practical examination (and instructor assessment). MUSI3012. Orchestral studies and techniques 3 (for students in their third year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Students participate in weekly rehearsals and performances with the University's orchestra over two semesters. Besides musical skills, this course focuses on teamwork, discipline, and creativity. To gain admission to the course, students must pass an audition and have reached the standard of ABRSM Grade 6 or equivalent on one of the following: violin, viola, cello, double bass, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, trumpet, trombone, tuba, or percussion. Orchestral studies and techniques 1 and 2 are not prerequisites. Assessment: 100% practical examination (and conductor assessment). MUSI3016. Directed study 2 (for students in their third year of study) (6 credits) This is a one-to-one course in which the student works with a supervisor throughout the year. During the first semester, the supervisor introduces theories and techniques of musical research through reading, discussion, and book reports. Towards the end of the semester, a research topic is to be decided upon between the student and supervisor. The second semester is devoted to the research on the topic and the writing of a thesis under the guidance of the supervisor. Entry to this course is at the discretion of the Head of the School of Humanities on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Coordinator of the department. Directed study 1 is not a prerequisite. Assessment: 100% thesis. MUSI3017. University choir 3 (for students in their third year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is open to all third-year students, focuses on musical performance. Students participate in weekly rehearsals and performances with the department's University Choir over two semesters. Besides musical skills, this course focuses on teamwork, discipline, and creativity. University choir 1 and University choir 2 are not prerequisites. Assessment: 100% practical examination (and conductor assessment). MUSI3018. Performance workshop 3 (for students in their third year of study) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Students may choose to enroll in any workshop offered by the Music Department, or take individual instrumental instruction with a teacher approved by the department over two semesters. Beginners are welcome, but places in this course are limited, especially for individual instrumental instruction. Except with the permission of the Head of the School of Humanities on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Coordinator of the department, Performance workshop 3 is open only to students taking a major in music. Please check with the Music Department for details. Performance workshop 1 and Performance workshop 2 are not prerequisites. Assessment: 100% practical examination (and instructor assessment). MUSI3019. Advanced music performance 3 (for students in their third year of study) (6 credits) 105 Students prepare a recital of 30-40 minutes under the supervision of a vocal or instrumental teacher approved by the department. At least one piece must be performed on a period instrument, or must use either period or advanced twentieth-century techniques, as appropriate. Places in this course are limited and admission is by audition. Except with the permission of the Head of the School of Humanities on the recommendation of the Undergraduate Coordinator of the department, Advanced music performance 3 is available only to students taking a major in music. Advanced music performance 1 and Advanced music performance 2 are not prerequisites. Assessment: 100% coursework. Philosophy First Year PHIL1001. Knowledge of the world: an introduction to philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Human beings have always attempted to understand and control the world they live in by asking questions, and seeking effective answers, about that world. These attempts have taken many forms, but philosophy has always been a central part of this process of explanation and the progress of knowledge. The questions of what we can know, how we can know, and how we can use what we know, are prime examples of philosophical questions that have come down to us in a long history of inquiry philosophy is a part of the natural and practical curiosity of mankind. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL1002. The human mind: an introduction to philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is an introduction to philosophical issues about the mind. These include metaphysical questions about what minds are, whether the mind is something non-physical or whether it is some kind of a computer. Then there are the epistemological questions about the limitation of human knowledge, such as whether we can really know what other people's experiences are like, or whether there is a God. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL1003. Ethics and society: an introduction to philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) One of the founders of Western philosophy, Socrates, claimed that the most important philosophical question is "How is one to live?" How are we to live in our relations with others as individuals? And how are we to live together in communities and societies? This course will introduce some of the ways that key philosophers in the Western tradition have answered these questions. Reading texts by Plato and Aristotle in ancient Greece, and modern and contemporary writings by Locke, Kant, Mill, Rawls and contemporary theorists of democracy, we will explore questions about the way we relate to other people. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL1004. Chinese and Western thought: an introduction to philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) 106 The course compares central themes in the philosophical dialogues of the Chinese and Western traditions. Topics may include Confucian intuition, Daoist paradox, Greek rationalism, British Empiricism, Existentialism, Pragmatism, Maoism, Zen Buddhism, and positivism. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL1005. Critical thinking and logic (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Critical thinking is a matter of thinking clearly and rationally. It is important for solving problems, effective planning, and expressing ideas clearly and systematically. We shall study the basic principles of critical thinking, and see show how they can be applied in everyday life. Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% final exam. PHIL1006. Elementary logic (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is a web-based self-study course on elementary formal logic. Formal logic uses special symbolic notations to study reasoning and arguments systematically. In this course we shall look at some basic concepts in logic, and learn how to use special logical symbols to construct and evaluate arguments. There are no lectures in this course, and all teaching material is available online for self-study. There are, however, optional tutorials for students to ask questions. Registered students should visit the philosophy department web site at the beginning of the semester to find out how they can obtain access to the learning material. Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% final exam. Not available to students who have taken PHIL2510. Logic. PHIL1008. Elementary logic II (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This web-based self-study course about formal logic is a sequel to PHIL 1006 Elementary logic. Topics will include first order predicate logic, deduction systems for propositional and first order predicate logic, elementary soundness and completeness results. Other topics may include applications to computer science, linguistics, and other areas. Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% final exam Prerequisite: PHIL1006 or permission of the instructor. Not available to students who have taken PHIL2510. Logic. Second and Third Years Group I: Knowledge and Reality PHIL2110. Knowledge (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Theory of knowledge deals with the nature and possibility of knowledge and its limits. We shall address questions that include: Is Scepticism possible? Are some kinds of knowledge more basic than others? Are our views of the world really true or just elaborate stories that serve our purposes? Can philosophers learn about knowledge from psychology and physiology? What could philosophers add to their stories? Is there one concept of justification (reason) or many (social and cultural differences)? 107 Is truth an important goal of knowledge? Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2120. Topics in analytic philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) An advanced introduction to contemporary philosophy, this course will focus on three areas of lively current debate. Students will have an opportunity to critically examine a sample of the best recent work in analytic philosophy. Careful attention will be paid to the roots of these debates in the work of Frege, Russell, Moore and Wittgenstein. Topics will include: skepticism, vagueness, and causation. Assessment: 100% coursework Prerequisites: none required, but one previous philosophy course is highly recommended. PHIL2130. Philosophy of the sciences (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) If we want to find out about the world around us, we look to science to provide the answers to our questions. But why? What justifies our faith in this enterprise? In this course, we shall investigate two related questions. First, what is scientific method? We shall examine answers ranging from the rigid prescriptions of Popper to the anarchism of Feyerabend. Second, what reason do we have to think that the explanations provided by science are true? Here the answers range from optimism based on the success of science, to pessimism based on our repeated rejection of past theories. Along the way, we shall critically consider notions such as progress, objectivity, and the difference between science and non-science. We shall examine how philosophical questions arise in actual scientific practice. What examples are selected for this purpose will, to some extent, be determined by the interests of students. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2140. Philosophy of social science (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) How should we understand and explain human life and activities? This course will examine different models of explanation in the social sciences, and will proceed by case studies. Which cases are taken will depend on the interests and knowledge of those who enrol for the course. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2150. Philosophy and biology (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Charles Darwin's theory of evolution had a huge impact on the way we think about mankind's place in the world. In this course we will discuss some of the philosophical consequences of this impact. No previous knowledge of the theory is required as we will begin with a critical introduction to its development and main features. Later in the course we will also consider the contemporary debate concerning the scope and limits of evolutionary theory. 108 Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2210. Metaphysics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course covers both the nature of reality and the nature of knowledge of it and treats the two questions as intrinsically connected. We shall examine a number of important theories of metaphysics, as well as anti-metaphysics, including those of Plato, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and contemporary philosophers such as Habermas, Rorty and Putnam. We will treat these theories not only as representing different views on metaphysics but also as forming a logical order of development. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2420. Chinese philosophy: metaphysics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) We study Chinese views of reality, human nature, language, wisdom and the relation of each to human society. Our main texts will be Daoist texts from the classical period, but we shall also discuss NeoDaoism, Buddhism and Neo-Confucian metaphysics. Assessment: 100% coursework. Group II: Mind and Language PHIL2070. Pragmatism (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is in two unequal parts. In the first and longer part, we shall study the writings of the classical pragmatists: Peirce, Dewey and James; in the second, we shall look more briefly at some of the so-called `neo-pragmatists' such as Quine, Davidson and Putnam. We shall then consider the question of the relationship between these two schools, and think seriously about the recent suggestion that the earlier is in fact the better. Topics to be discussed include: truth and knowledge; religion and science; and rationality, personality and aesthetics. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2075. The semantics/pragmatics distinction (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) One of the central issues in contemporary philosophy of language and linguistics concerns whether and where one should draw the line between semantic meaning and pragmatic meaning, or the meanings had by the words and sentences a speaker uses, and what a speaker means in using those words and sentences. One reason the issue is central is that there are debates over the semantic meanings of certain expressions, e.g. names and definite descriptions. Without a general account of the difference between semantic and pragmatic meaning, these debates cannot be settled. Another reason the issue is central is that there are some who, in a roughly Wittgensteinian manner, deny that there is any real sense to be made of the notion of semantic, or literal, meaning. According to them, 109 there is, therefore, no line between pragmatic and semantic meaning at all. In this course we will try to determine whether the distinction can be drawn, and, if so, where. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2220. The mind (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The human mind is the nexus of a number of great mysteries. What is the nature of self? Is the mind identical to the brain, or is it an immaterial substance? Is Artificial Intelligence possible, and can computers experience emotions and other feelings? Are our actions free, or are they determined by our genes and upbringing? We shall be exploring some of these issues and other related topics in this course. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2230. Philosophy and cognitive science (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) We shall look at some of the philosophical issues involved in studying minds and behaviour scientifically. We might discuss questions such as: Can we explain all mental phenomena in computational terms? What is consciousness? What is the role of language in thinking? How useful are neural networks in understanding the mind? Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2250. Logic, computation, and neural networks (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is about the basic concepts and results relating to computability theory, especially in relation to logic and philosophy. The logic of computation is of special relevance to linguistics, psychology, computer science, cognitive science, the philosophy of mind, and the foundation of mathematics. We shall look at various definitions of computations such as Turing computability, and consider also the relevance of computation theory to actual computers. We might also look at computations in neural networks and examine their role in psychology, neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2460. Philosophical Chinese (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) In this course, we shall learn to analyse grammatically and semantically the language used in the classical texts of Chinese philosophy. The analysis will help us construct arguments in favour of or against various interpretations and translations. We briefly discuss texts from the Analects of Confucius, the Mozi, the Zhuangzi and then do a detailed analysis of the Daode Jing. Assessment: 100% coursework. 110 PHIL2510. Logic (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is an introduction to formal logic. We will review sentential and predicate logic. We will discuss theorems about formal systems of logic, including soundness and completeness. Time permitting, we will discuss advanced topics such as Gdel's incompleteness theorems, computability, Tarski's theorem, or modal logic. Students are expected to know some elementary formal logic before enrolling in this course. In preparation, students can take PHIL 1005, or PHIL1006, or else students can study the online material on logic produced by the department. For further details, please contact the department. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2511. Paradoxes (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Paradoxes are arguments which proceed from highly plausible assumptions, through highly plausible and usually simple steps to highly implausible conclusions. Some examples: Zeno's paradoxes of motion, Kant's antinomies, the Liar and the paradox of the surprise examination. What such paradoxes show is that there is something deeply wrong with some of our most fundamental ways of thinking. We shall attempt to find solutions to certain of these paradoxes. Students are expected to know some elementary formal logic before studying this course. To prepare for the course, they can either take PHIL1006 Elementary Logic, or study the online material on logic produced by the department. For further details, please contact the department. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2520. Philosophy of logic (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) When thinking about inference, a number of concepts come to our attention, such as truth, logical constants, propositions, necessity, consequence, logical form. Various questions with which the course deals include: `What is the relation of Logic to reasoning?'; `What does the existence of paradoxes tell us about our accepted logical principles?'; `What is the best way to represent arguments in ordinary language if we wish to study the validity of such arguments?' `Are there types of discourse which are by nature fuzzy, demanding a fuzzy logic for their representation?'; `Must logic fit empirical facts, or is it a `pure' discipline?' Students are expected to know some elementary formal logic before studying this course. To prepare for the course, they can either take PHIL1006 Elementary Logic, or study the online material on logic produced by the department. For further details, please contact the department. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2610. Philosophy of language (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) What is a language, and what is involved in knowing or understanding a language? In this course we will see how philosophers and linguists answer such questions as the following: What can logic tell us 111 about the grammar of natural languages? Are human beings born with a universal grammar? What makes a word meaningful? What is the difference between what we mean and what we convey when we say something? How does a metaphor work? Can we learn something from slips of the tongue about the nature of language? Assessment: 100% coursework. Group III: Moral and Political Philosophy PHIL2080. Marxist philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The world has changed a great deal since the time of Marx. But Marxism, duly updated and refined, still has a lot to teach us about the nature of human society and historical change, the capitalist organization of society, the foundation and limits of liberal democracy, the constitution of power and the political. These and other issues raised by Marxism are, or ought to be, among the central concerns of political philosophy or philosophy of history. We will examine how Marxism, especially contemporary Marxism, can serve as a useful critique of liberal political philosophy and liberal political institutions. We will also discuss how Marxism itself needs to be transformed or reconceived in order to create an appealing democratic vision of genuine contemporary relevance. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2310. Theories of morality (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course covers some of the main highlights of 20th century moral philosophy, with passing attention to some of the earlier, historical background as needed. Questions covered include: Is morality relative or absolute? Can a moral practice be right in one culture but wrong in another? Is morality basically a form of personal or social opinion, or is there any way it can be made objective or even scientific? If morality is not science, is there any rational way of resolving moral disputes? Perspectives considered include religious and nature-based theories, performative theories, rational intuitionism, utilitarianism and modern theories of justice. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2320. Happiness (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Happiness is something we all strive for, despite the fact that we have only hazy and inconsistent notions of what it would involve. Is it a psychological state or the condition of living a good life? Is it to be gained by withdrawing from the world, or engaging in it? Are we, in some sense, designed to be happy, or is it always an impossibility? This course will lead students through some of the most influential conceptualisations of happiness in the Western tradition. We will consider, in detail, the work of Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics), J.S.Mill (Utlitarianism) and Freud (Civilisation and Its Discontents). This focus will allow us to explore a range of ideas about the nature of happiness and the possibility (or impossibility) of our achieving it. Particular emphasis will be placed on the ongoing influence of these conflicting ideas in our contemporary world. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. 112 PHIL2340. Moral problems (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Many practical problems give rise to moral controversies. Among the questions to be considered in this course are `Should one person treat all others equally?'; `Is abortion a type of killing, and is it acceptable?', `Should certain types of pornography be banned?'; `Can capital punishment be justified?'; `Is it right to take affirmative action in favour of groups who have been discriminated against in the past?'; `Should old people be helped to die, if that is what they wish?'. These are all `large-scale' questions, but we shall also be discussing less grand, but no less important moral dilemmas that we each confront from time to time. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2345. Social contract theories (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) In this course we study the major modern theories of social contract, starting with the seventeenthcentury Leviathan of Thomas Hobbes, which places the state above its subjects. Later in the same century John Locke's Second Treatise of Government argued that the contracting parties to the state would seek protection of their property above all, and that they could dismiss a non-performing government, an inspiration for the American Revolution. Jean-Jacques Rousseau rejected the positions of Hobbes and Locke, basing his social contract on the will of all jointly to secure the common good, or `general will'. John Rawls' A Theory of Justice in the twentieth century bases the democratic system on a conception of social justice grounded in equality of basic rights and regard for the least advantaged members of society. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2350. Philosophy of law (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) We shall set the scene by contrasting classical Western and Chinese views of law. Then we shall focus on what moral and political presuppositions are required to justify the rule of law. This will guide our view of how one ought to reason in interpreting the law, and finally see what the implications of theory of law are for our views of punishment, rights, justice, equality, responsibility, insanity, and negligence. This course should help you evaluate the arguments for the importance of the rule of law in Hong Kong. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2355. Theories of justice (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) All of us care about justice but perhaps you seldom pause to reflect on the nature of justice and the many difficult issues which justice raises. This course introduces you to these issues and systematic ways of thinking about them. In a nutshell, justice is concerned with the question, How should the benefits and burdens of social cooperation be distributed among members of society under conditions of scarcity and conflicting values? Or, as Serge-Christophe Kolm puts it, "What should be done when 113 different people's desires or interests oppose one another and cannot all be fully satisfied? Justice is the justified answer to this question and its science is the theory of justice." We will think about this question at two levels: the distribution of fundamental rights and duties in the basic structure of society; and the distribution of goods in particular domains, such as health care. Since controversy abounds at both levels, we will discuss and compare a variety of positions, including those of John Rawls, Brian Barry, Amartya Sen, Ronald Dworkin, Robert Nozick, Serge-Christophe Kolm, Norman Daniels, and Francis Kamm. We will also consider whether, and to what degree, Western theories of justice such as these are useful for thinking about issues of justice in Hong Kong and the PRC at large. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2360. Political philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This survey course addresses fundamental questions in the history of political philosophy. Questions about government, justice, property and rights will be addressed through the work of a range of historical and contemporary thinkers. Philosophers to be studied may include Aristotle, Hobbes, Marx, Rawls, and others. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2362. Liberal democracy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Liberal democracy is the dominant political value and form of government in terms of power and influence in the world today. It is supposed to be a coherent combination of liberalism and democracy, and yet there are deep tensions between these two components. It is by identifying these tensions that we can best understand the workings of liberal democracy as a form of government and assess its plausibility and appeal as a political value. Within this context, such familiar topics as political agency, freedom, rights, and private life will be seen in a fresh light. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2365. Philosophical problems of modernity (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will focus on responses to one of the key questions that is posed by twentieth century European philosophy: that is, what is the nature of this modernity in which we live? According to Marx, the experience of modernity is one in which `all that is solid melts into air'; while acording to some contemporary philosophers this is precisely the experience of post-modernity. In this course, we will examine the responses of key 20th century philosophers to the question of modernity and postmodernity (these may include, Benjamin, Adorno & Horkheimer, Habermas, Foucault, Lyotard and Bauman). Particular attention will be paid to the way this questioning has lead to a reconceptualisation of ethics and politics in contemporary societies. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2369. Philosophy of nature (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) 114 In this course we will develop an understanding of historically and philosophically significant approaches to the environment such as anthropocentrism (mainstream environmentalism) and biocentrism (deep ecology). We will read authors both from the history of philosophy (Bacon, Descartes and Locke) as well as modern philosophers. We will look at the implications of these philosophies in recent environmental controversies in Hong Kong. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2375. Philosophy of art (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course focuses on the philosophical issues which arise when we consider the nature of aesthetic appreciation and judgement. These are some of the questions which will be discussed in the course: What is mimesis? Does art simply mirror nature? Is beauty merely 'in the eye of the beholder'? What differences might there be between aesthetic appreciation of art and aesthetic appreciation of nature? What is the relation between art and society? What is the difference between the sublime and the beautiful? These and other questions will be explored through the work of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Dewey, Heidegger Foucault and Lyotard. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2380. Philosophy and literature (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces two ways of studying philosophy and literature in relation to each other. On the one hand, we shall try to illuminate a range of philosophical, particularly ethical, problems through a close reading of literary texts (which may include the work of Dostoevsky, Henry James, Franz Kafka, and James Joyce). On the other hand, we shall bring the resources of philosophy to bear on questions of literary theory and interpretation (for example, the role of the reader, the position of the writer and the ethics of reading). Both philosophical essays and literary works will be used in the course. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2390. Philosophy of religion (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Topics discussed will include: the nature of religious experience, the existence of God, life after death, religion and morality, religion and reason. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2430. Chinese philosophy: ethics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) An introduction to comparative moral philosophy, with readings drawn from the classical Chinese 115 tradition as well as from modern, analytical sources. Figures likely to be taken up include Confucius, Mencius, Mo Tzu and Han Fei Tzu. Attention will be given to the historical development of Chinese moral thinking through these key representatives. Questions to be taken up include the question of whether traditional Chinese thought can have relevance to us in the modern world, and how our beliefs about our nature may shape our beliefs about what is moral or immoral. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2480. Confucianism and the modern world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces some of the central ideas of Confucianism, particularly as they have been developed by Neo-Confucian thinkers, and considers the contemporary meaning and relevance of these ideas for societies with a Confucian tradition. The thematic focus of the course is on whether and how (Neo-)Confucianism promotes or hinders economic, political and cultural modernization. We shall also discuss how (Neo-)Confucianism interacts with Western ideas, and (in the case of the PRC) Marxism in the process of social transformation. Assessment: 100% coursework. Group IV: History of Philosophy PHIL2001. The beginnings of philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The contents of this course will vary from year to year, but it is likely to include important early thinkers like Plato and Aristotle in the West, and/or Confucius and Lao Tze in China. Details will be announced in good time in the departmental booklet `Choices in Philosophy'. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2002. Early modern philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines the works of early-modern philosophers writing on politics and science, stressing the interconnections between them. We will examine the claim by some of these philosophers that modern science and technology hold the key to what Francis Bacon called `the relief of man's estate'. We will read Bacon, Descartes, Bossuet, Locke, La Mettrie, Diderot and Rousseau. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2010. Plato (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course offers a general introduction to the central concerns of Plato's philosophy. It focuses on Plato's early and middle dialogues in which the enigmatic character of Socrates is central. It addresses Plato's teachings on the role of philosophy in the life of the individual, the relation between knowledge and virtue, and his contribution to questions about the nature of love and desire. Assessment: 100% coursework. 116 There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2011. Aristotle (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle (384-322 BCE) researched virtually every aspect of human knowledge, producing works that influence philosophy and many other fields down to the present. This course looks at his political and social philosophy; we will read his Parts of Animals, Politics and Constitution of Athens, examining his concepts of nature, human nature, slavery, property, citizenship, democracy, education and the ideal city. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2020. Descartes (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The standard accounts of Descartes' philosophy have tended to focus on his late metaphysics and epistemology, but this course is intended as an introduction to many more of the interesting aspects of Descartes' thought. We shall, of course, discuss some of the standard issues in their rightful place (and discuss what that place might be), but we shall also consider Descartes' contributions to, and philosophical thoughts about, e.g. physics, mathematics, and medicine. (N.B. No specialist knowledge of these areas is required). The reading will be a combination of Descartes' primary texts (recently published in a very clear translation) and contemporary secondary material. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2025. Hume (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) David Hume (1711 1776) was one of the great founders of modern empiricism. This course will serve not only as an introduction to Hume's philosophy, but also as an introduction to modern empiricism as developed especially in the analytical tradition of modern philosophy. The course will appeal especially to students interested in the theory of knowledge, metaphysics and philosophy of mind, as well as to students interested primarily in the history of philosophy. The course takes up key topics in Hume, such as: Hume's theory of ideas; the formation of reason and imagination; knowledge of the external world and skepticism with regard to the senses; induction; causation, probability and the idea of necessary connection; personal identity; freedom and determinism, reasoning in animals; miracles; virtue and vice in the context of Hume's naturalism. Readings will be drawn primarily from Hume's A Treatise on Human Nature and An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2027. Rousseau (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) was one of the most important philosophers of the French eighteenth century. He was critical of the Enlightenment's fascination with science, arguing that 117 virtue, community and a kind of freedom, not technological `progress', should be the goal of human striving. In this course we seek to understand Rousseau's thought in its historical context; we consider how he can be considered a philosopher for our own time, who respected the rights of nature as well as those of humanity. We read selections from his Confessions, and the entire texts of his Discourse on the Sciences and the Arts, and his Discourse on the Origins of Inequality among Men. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2030. Kant's critical philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Two aspects of Kant's philosophy will be examined: first, topics in his theoretical philosophy such as objective knowledge, transcendental idealism and the thing-in-itself; second, topics in his practical philosophy such as moral duty, free will and rationality. Attempts will also be made to unify these two aspects of Kant's philosophy. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2035. Philosophy of the Enlightenment (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The eighteenth-century European philosophical movement known as `The Enlightenment' called all previous philosophy into question, destabilizing conventional views of humanity, nature, society and the cosmos; the Enlightenment influences philosophy to this day. This course examines important European thinkers such as Francis Bacon, Bernard Mandeville, Denis Diderot, Jean le Rond D'Alembert, Julien Offrray de La Mettrie, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Immanuel Kant from a historical as well as philosophical perspective. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2040. Nietzsche (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Nietzsche occupies a special place in Western thought, both as a wholesale critic of the philosophical tradition that went before him (e.g. Socrates, Kant), and as a precursor of certain philosophical trends that are important today (e.g. Foucault, Derrida). This course offers an overview of Nietzsche's philosophy (including the will to power, perspectivism, nihilism, eternal return) and discusses Nietzsche's influence on contemporary thought. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2050. Philosophy of history (6 credits) This course looks at ideas of a universal, `sacred history' stemming from Judaism and Christianity, as articulated by St. Augustine, and moves on to the secular idea of an underlying, universal pattern to the seeming chaos of human history expressed in the writings of thinkers from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Readings will include excerpts from the writings of Herder, Kant, Condorcet, Hegel, Popper and Fukuyama. Assessment: 100% coursework. 118 PHIL2060. Wittgenstein (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Wittgenstein said that his aim in philosophy was `to show the fly the way out of the fly bottle'. By this he meant that certain preconceptions, oversimplifications and poor analogies had led philosophers to construct misguided theories about such things as sensation, meaning, understanding and the nature of language, and that it was his task not to construct alternative theories but to point out the ways in which the theorists (including his earlier self) had become entrapped. This programme may appear modest, but Wittgenstein's approach has had far-reaching consequences and his work has received more discussion than that of any other twentieth century philosopher and has influenced philosophy and many other disciplines. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2077. Habermas (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The important German philosopher Habermas, combining strengths of the Continental and AngloAmerican philosophical traditions, has developed a highly influential theory on a wide range of moral, political and historical issues. This course is designed to provide a general introduction to Habermas's interdisciplinary, comprehensive, and politically engaged way of doing philosophy. Topics covered include discourse ethics, the public sphere, social action and rationality, technology and science as ideology, the nature of modernity, and legitimation problems in late capitalism. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2085. Contemporary European philosophy (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The contents of this course will vary from year to year, but it is likely to cover various important twentieth century thinkers (these may include Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Foucault, Derrida) and/or major movements in twentieth century European thought (such as phenomenology, existentialism, structuralism and poststructuralism). Details will be announced in good time in the departmental booklet `Choices in Philosophy'. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. PHIL2090. Foucault (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The work of French philosopher Michel Foucault (1924-1984) has been enormously influential in many fields: from philosophy and politics to social theory and gender studies. This course offers a general introduction to this work, with particular focus on power, knowledge and sexuality. It will end with a consideration of Foucault's contribution to a contemporary re-thinking of subjectivity and ethics. Assessment: 100% coursework. There is no prerequisite for this course. 119 PHIL2440. Confucius (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will look at modern interpretations of traditional Confucianism, primarily from the perspective of modern analytical philosophy, but with some attention also to the sociological literature, and to modern applications of Confucianism, for example in Singapore. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2442. Mencius (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Mencius, the most influential of Confucian philosophers, presents interesting challenges to interpretation. Does his philosophy provide a basis for a Chinese theory of human rights? Is his conception of human nature defensible today? Which tradition of interpretation (mind or principle) gives the most plausible interpretation? We shall discuss these questions while looking at some modern scholarly interpretations of Mencius in his ancient context. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2450. Zhuangzi (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) In this course we shall explore different lines of interpretation of Zhuangzi's Daoist philosophy. Students will participate in defending either relativist, sceptical or mystical readings of key passages. We shall start our analysis with the historical context and some textual theory. Then we shall discuss several chapters in some detail, including the historical account of the development of Daoism in `Tianxia', the relativism in `Autumn Floods' and `Free and Easy Wandering', and finally the analytic scepticism and pluralism of the `Essay on Making Things Equal'. Assessment: 100% coursework. PHIL2451. Philosophers' views of China in early-modern Europe (6 credits) This course examines the varied views of China, its philosophy and government in the writings of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century ("early-modern") philosophers ranging from Leibniz to Rousseau. The debates broached at the time (e.g. is China a model for Europe or not?) resonate down to the present day. Assessment: 100% coursework. Courses of unspecified category PHIL3810. Senior seminar (6 credits) This course will focus each year on a different key philosophical text. Presentations will be made by students and discussed according to a schedule worked out in advance between students and the course co-ordinator. Selected third-year students will be included. Assessment: 100% coursework. 120 This is a third-year course, and is normally offered every year. Permission to attend it will be given to those students with good second year grades. PHIL3910. Senior thesis (12 credits) A thesis may be prepared under supervision for submission not later than March 31 of the final year. Students have to decide a topic on which they would like to write, then select a teacher in the relevant field and discuss the project with him/her, before the end of their second year. If the teacher deems the project viable, then a thesis title must be agreed by the closing date of June 15. The student will then have to work on the thesis over the summer, and be able to demonstrate progress made. If the progress is adequate, work on the thesis may continue; if not, the student will have to take two courses instead. There are no word limits prescribed, but theses tend to be between 15,000 and 25,000 words in length. Assessment will be based entirely on the completed thesis. This course is only available to students majoring in Philosophy. School of Modern Languages and Cultures American Studies courses First Year AMER1009. Consuming culture: decoding American symbols (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Images of America (as revealed in Hollywood films, television, advertisements, music and music videos, news media and consumer products) shape our vision of US culture. In a course specifically designed with Hong Kong students in mind, we will study and decode cultural products mediated to us by the increasingly global American media. We will approach national culture, including popular culture, as an extension and creation of national myths and propaganda and explore why American people are so attached to certain symbols, and what these symbols mean for the United States as a whole. In the course of our discussions we may touch on the symbolism and reality of the American Dream and the myth of "rags to riches," the notion of success, materialism and consumerist culture, as well as on the national and international symbols that for many define the image of America. We may also consider distinctions between high and low/popular cultures and see how class, gender and race affect notions of culture generally and how they shape the particular themes of US culture under discussion. Assessment: 100% coursework. AMER1011. Born in the USA: U.S. youth cultures (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Baby boomers, Beats, Hippies, Yuppies and Gen(eration) Xers are labels assigned to various generations of American youth. This first-year survey course explores the connection between historical change and adolescence/early adulthood in the United States during the second half of the 20th century. Throughout the term we will consider youth culture through the interdisciplinary mix of history, politics, literature, and popular culture. From these diverse perspectives, we will discover how young people in America are defined and how they attempt to define themselves by their subcultures, fashion, leisure, music, use of the internet, slang, education, and other expressions of identity. While teaching about American youth cultures, the course will offer students a chance to 121 reflect on their own experiences as adolescents/young adults and focus on improving critical thinking, speaking and writing skills. Assessment: 100% coursework. AMER1015. Wall Street: Issues in American business (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will draw on selected issues in American business in order to teach us about the essential characteristics of US society, including its character, values, as well as written (e.g. legal) and unwritten codes of behaviour. Every day, decisions are made on Wall Street which affect how business is conducted in America, Asia, and everywhere else around the globe. How did one address become so influential in, and such an icon of, American business? This course seeks to examine the Wall Street phenomenon, as well as its culture, influence and impact on specific components of American business. Issues under discussion may involve the nature of American business, its place in the national life ("the business of America is business," affirmed President Coolidge), its code of ethics and failures to live by that code. Case studies will be drawn from the famous and infamous examples of American entrepreneurial spirit as they made headlines up to, and including, the 21st century. Furthermore, issues such as the rise of the Internet and the information age will be examined to explore the reverse--how they shape Wall Street and the way business is conducted in America. Assessment: 100% coursework. AMER1017. Movieland: America on Hollywood's big screen (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Hollywood is known to spin dreams, visions and illusions but, caught in the big-screen experience, viewers often forget that these dreams and illusions are spun within particular social and cultural contexts. Films are woven into national myths, myths are woven into the society that builds them, and society is woven into the people that create and recreate America everyday as they live, work and go to the movies. This course will look at many of the biggest, most famous and most representative Hollywood blockbusters--films and their movie-star icons--that in many ways define American culture. Students will be introduced to various genres that have become synonymous with Hollywood, among them the action thriller, classic and revisionist western, MGM musical, film noir and police story, science fiction, romantic comedy, Disney animation, and others. The experience of these films and their contexts will broaden our knowledge of American cultural values and help us critique these values, so that the reality of American life is explored alongside its ideals. The course will also aim to enhance critical and creative thinking as well as speaking and writing skills. Assessment: 100% coursework AMER1018. From crime fiction to social document: Introduction to 20th-century American literature (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, James Caan, Jack Nicholson, Robert Eliot Gould... all these Hollywood actors played him: the tired gumshoe, the hired dick, the hardboiled detective, the gun for hire, the private eye. If you've seen them in action and liked what you saw, now is your chance to study the original novels on which the films were based. In this course we will read and analyze some of the classic novels of the genre which at various points has been labelled hardboiled fiction, tough guy fiction, or even noir, and what they tell us about life in America in the 20th century. We will begin with a socio-economic look at the several decades in American history crucial to the development of modern crime, crime-fighting forces and crime fiction, laying the foundations for a better understanding of the novels and films in the course and the social issues they touch on. Building on these opening lectures, we will trace the rise of the hardboiled story from pulp fictions of 122 the 1920s and the emergence of the classic hero (the private eye) and heroine (the femme fatale), to the contemporary examples of the genre, including the police procedural and the legal/lawyer procedural. We will try to identify what is specific and recurrent about American crime fiction in terms of its structure and themes, and try to understand its portrayal of America then and now. Assessment: 100% coursework Second Year/Third Year American Studies AMER2002. The road in American culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The popular hit song, "Hit the road, Jack," is as much a part of American culture and slang as Jack Kerouac's bestselling account of his life on the American highway, On the Road. For better or worse, North Americans have always been on the road, pushing westward towards California, Oregon and British Columbia, moving around the country in pursuit of the American Dream, or just driving along Route 66 to escape the mundane suburban life. This restlessness and the ease with which large segments of the population move and resettle characterizes many aspects of US and Canadian life, turning the road into one of the most powerful symbols in North American literature and culture. Through the analysis of various media forms, which may include film, fiction, music, material culture and architecture, this course will consider the road in America as reality and icon, extending it to the recent emergence of the Internet and the "information highway." Assessment: 100% coursework. AMER2014. A dream in the heart: varieties of Asian American culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Like so many other immigrants to the United States, Asians Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, Koreans, etc. were also drawn by the dream of Golden Mountain. Yet once in America, they would confront not only promise and possibility but the dream's betrayal: hostility, rejection, and exclusion. This course will explore the varieties of Asian American cultures that emerge out of the painful, disruptive struggles between expectation and reality faced by these immigrants and their children, and the representation of their experiences in the arts, media, politics and popular culture. Asian Americans are frequently stereotyped as model minorities for striving after the American dream of education, wealth, and political representation. We will examine and challenge this "model minority" idea in American life and politics, especially as it relates to inter-minority conflict and cooperation, as individual American minority groups attempt to achieve their own version of American success. Assessment: 100% coursework. AMER2015. The American city (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) In 1800 only 6% of Americans lived in cities; in 2000 this number was more than 80%. As a center of growth, power, and cultural diversity, the American city has always occupied a crucial place in America's vision of itself as a new nation. "A cruel city, but a lovely one, a savage city, yet it had such tenderness"this quote from Thomas Wolfe's A Vision of the City is representative of the varied cultural representations of the American urban environment as a place where fortunes and lives are made or lost. Through an examination of literature, art, architecture, photography, film and music, this course will take a closer look at some of the greatest as well as the "baddest" American 123 metropolises, looking for a way to understand the people who live, commute, work, create, govern, commit crime and conduct business in them. Assessment: 100% coursework. AMER2018. Show me the money: doing business with Americans (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is designed to familiarize students with business practice in the United States and in American corporations operating in Hong Kong, laying foundations for a better understanding of the individuals and institutions driving the economy. Weekly sessions will include lectures and, whenever possible, discussions with members of the American business community in the Asia-Pacific region. Topics may include: U.S. business history and economic cycles, American entrepreneurs, the ethics and etiquette of U.S. corporate culture, government/business relationships, gender and business, glass ceilings and opportunities for advancement, and business and technological change. Assessment: 100% coursework. AMER2021. On the road again: Field trip in American Studies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Concentrating on North American points of interest from cities to landscape to cultural sites -- this course will explore the variety and complexity of American life. Throughout the semester students will conduct group research and deliver presentations on the cities and locations to be visited in the summer, which will typically vary in the years the course is offered. In 2004, for example, the field trip will stretch from Los Angeles and the "Star Walk" of Hollywood, to San Francisco and its worldfamous Chinatown, to the metropolitan Seattle which both Bruce Lee and Bill Gates called home, to the Calgary stampede which every year enacts the cowboy rituals of the Wild West. Assessment: 100% coursework AMER2022. What's on TV? Television and American culture (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Television has been a powerful force in US history and culture. American TV shows and programming styles have been exported globally, and are modified to suit diverse cultural settings, including Hong Kong. The United States exerts significant global influence, in part because of its success in marketing itself, both domestically and abroad, through media and entertainment. While many contest the content or perspective of American media, few are exempt from its impact. This course offers students a chance to consider the impact of television inside and outside of the US and explore how the American media-machine reaches into every facet of the nation's life as well as into the lives of people around the world. Topics to be discussed in the course may include the history of television, strategies for critical viewing, war and TV, educational television, television's domination of politics, youth culture and TV, the technology behind television programming, and finally TV programming in Hong Kong. Assessment: 100% coursework. AMER2029. Current perspectives on the U.S. (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Students in this course will be discussing current and past events as reported in newspapers, magazines, television, literature, films and on the internet. The course will focus on domestic issues facing Americans at home as well as on political, economic, and cultural links between the United States and other nations. Pedagogy will be student-centered and require students to participate regularly in (and at times lead) discussions. Typical topics may include the analysis of the American 124 political system and the presidency, the relationship between business and politics, the role of sports in American life, the fallout from September 11, the rise of rap and hip-hop, manufacturing media, regionalism, stand-up comedy and social satire, and the US university system. These and other issues will form the basis of the course taught, on occasion, with the help of representatives of various disciplines across the spectrum of the arts, humanities and social sciences. Assessment: 100% coursework. AMER2030. Foundations of American Studies: Part I (6 credits) (This course is normally open only to second-year students and is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course and its companion, Foundations in American Studies: Part 2 (offered in the second semester), are requisite for all Majors in the American Studies Programme. Building on the introductory material from the first year, the course provides a mosaic of perspectives on the United States between 1600 and 1900 through an intensive series of lectures and discussions. Following an overview of and a general introduction to the United States, a number of invited experts will trace the development of American society from pre-Columbian times to the beginning of the 20th century. The lectures will range over a diverse but complementary array of viewpoints, and may include geography, history, sociology, business, education, art, music, theatre, language and literature. This unique approach will allow students to sample and compare multidisciplinary perspectives on such foundational issues in US history as the settlement, expansion, the War of Independence, laissez faire capitalism, slavery, the Civil War, and the country's rising economic, political and military domination. The lectures will be enriched with discussions, film clips, music, and prints from this period in American life. Assessment: 100% coursework AMER2031. Foundations of American Studies: Part II (6 credits) (This course is normally open only to second-year students and is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course and its companion, Foundations in American Studies: Part 1 (offered in the first semester), are requisite for all Majors in the American Studies Programme. In this course we will focus exclusively on the 20th and 21st centuries and on the internal problems and international conflicts that shape the face of America today. Among the topics for study and discussion may be the flood of immigration at the turn of the 20th century, the gangster-friendly Jazz Age, the Great Depression, World War II, the worldwide Cold War and the conformist `50s, the psychedelic flower-power `60s, and the post-Vietnam decades in which the US increasingly lost touch with its ideals. Through lectures and class debates we will attempt to compare our popular knowledge of America with the sometimes different historical reality behind it. From documentary sources and literary nonfiction, through film, novels, comic books and rap music, we will lay foundations for a better understanding of the country which for better or worse continues to make the world headlines today. Assessment: 100% coursework AMER2033. Asia on America's screen (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) "The Orient" has always held a dual attraction of romance and danger outside Asia, and this tradition has since been reinforced by Hollywood. The allure of wealth, trade and exoticism that brought millions of Americans across the Pacific provided rich material for movie drama. This combination of geographical attraction and cultural appeal was further reinforced during the wars the United States fought in Asia. War, violence and romance fill America's movie screens, pulling in vast crowds and 125 in the process shaping and mis-shaping America's view of Asia. Asking what is Asia and how far it extends, this course will explore cinematic representations of the continent and its people as constructed by Hollywood during more than a century of selling romantic myths to a public that often has no first-hand experience of Asian culture and no firm grasp of its history. Assessment: 100% coursework AMER2035. Addicted to war? The US at home and abroad (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The Vietnam War was the first war in the age of the television and the first war that America lost. The emotions aroused by the loss of American lives and the images of violence and brutality made TV and Hollywood important actors in the war for hearts and minds. This course will examine the multiple wars, police actions, military invasions, armed "liberations," coups d'etats, political assassinations, "regime changes," and other euphemisms for military aggression and intervention on an international scale. Among other issues discussed may be international weapons trade, the Cold War, the two World Wars, international peace keeping, "wars" on drugs and/or terrorism, and the state of civil liberties in the US. In the process we will also examine the role of movies, television and journalistic reportage in shaping public opinion and thus indirectly the American perception and misperception of the rest of the world. Assessment: 100% coursework AMER2037. Institutions in American life: home, education, work and play (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes and to nonmajors subject to the approval of the Programme Co-ordinator.) Institutions structure the lives of all Americans. While institutions can be thought of in terms of discreet organizations--Harvard University, the New York Stock Exchange, National Basketball Association, the Metropolitan Museum of Art--or even the buildings in which these organizations are housed, in the broader sense, institutions are the forms into which social activity is organized. Among the most fundamental institutions of this latter type are the family, school, business, and leisure. Each of them is associated with values, beliefs and practices which, taken together, help to constitute American culture. The course will examine these and other types of institutions in order to understand the origins of the values, beliefs and practices which they embody. We will also study how these values, beliefs and practices may have been influenced by such factors as ethnicity, race, class, religion, and geographic region, and how the institutions and the ideas they embody have persisted or changed over time. In the process, we will seek to identify common themes, and to consider how certain tensions--for example between individualism and community, democracy and excellence, service and profit--have shaped each of these institutions, and through them, American society. Finally, we will consider the extension of these institutions, and their values and practices, beyond the United States, asking how American ideas about home, school, work and play have impacted and interacted with other cultures, including Asian. Assessment: 100% coursework Third Year AMER3004. Senior seminar in American Studies: Part I (6 credits) (This course is also open to non-majors subject to the approval of the Programme Co-ordinator.) This course is required of all Majors in the American Studies Programme and is designed to cap students' university careers with a rigorous, interdisciplinary and theme-based program of study. The specific area of study may vary from year to year depending on students' background, interests and the expertise of the instructor. Students will deepen their research and writing skills, conduct 126 discussion sessions, participate in intensive group work, get involved in a mentoring program and continue to hone the critical thinking skills nurtured during their education in American Studies. The seminar will seek ways to prepare students to make the transition from the university setting to a variety of employment settings. Assessment: 100% coursework AMER3005. Senior seminar in American Studies: Part II (6 credits) (This course is also open to non-majors subject to the approval of the Programme Co-ordinator.) This course is required of all Majors in the American Studies Programme and is designed to cap students' university careers with a rigorous, interdisciplinary and theme-based program of study. The specific area of study may vary from year to year depending on students' background, interests and the expertise of the instructor. Students will deepen their research and writing skills, conduct discussion sessions, participate in intensive group work, get involved in a mentoring program and continue to hone the critical thinking skills nurtured during their education in American Studies. The seminar will seek ways to prepare students to make the transition from the university setting to a variety of employment settings. Assessment: 100% coursework AMER3006. Dissertation (12 credits) This is a directed reading course aimed at top students in American Studies who would like to pursue an individualized program of research under the supervision of a mentor, typically (though not necessarily) an American Studies Programme instructor or an American Studies Board member. The student is responsible for approaching the instructor in advance and obtaining consent for supervision. The coursework will normally consist of designing the project around a topic relevant to the Programme, compiling a bibliography, research and reading, and finally writing the dissertation. A project proposal consisting of a thesis statement, preliminary outline of research (typically 3-5 pages), timetable for completion, and working bibliography will be filed with the Programme Coordinator no later than November 30. The full dissertation (approximately 40-80 pages) shall be completed and presented for examination by April 30 of the academic year in which the course is taken. Assessment: 100% coursework Other courses, offered from time to time by the component departments and approved by the Board of Studies in American Studies in conjunction with the department concerned, may be used to fulfill programme requirements. Students who wish to count courses towards the requirements of the American Studies major that are not listed in this syllabus need to seek special Faculty Board approval. EUROPEAN STUDIES COURSES FIRST YEAR COURSE EUST1010. Foundations of European Studies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This first year course serves as an introduction to European Studies. It is a core requirement for students wishing to major in European Studies, but it is also suitable for anyone seeking a broad understanding of European society and culture. The course examines the forces which have led to Europe becoming increasingly integrated (not the least being the sheer devastation of two world wars) as well as the subsequent tensions and objections to that process. We study the processes and structures of the specific institutions of the European Union and the Council of Europe as well as 127 some of the major issues confronting the EU now, such as enlargement and the constitution. We will also look at some major European domestic concerns as well as divergent foreign policy issues between Europe and the USA. The approach is multidisciplinary, embracing politics, economics, history, culture and religion Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination SECOND AND THIRD YEAR COURSES EUST2010. European identity (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is required of all European Studies majors in their second year, will introduce students to the linkages between modern Europe, its historical foundations and its various national identities. Issues of identity will include history, politics, society, languages, religion and culture from the ancient to contemporary periods. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination EUST2011. Modern European lifestyle: fashion, food, music and sex in Europe (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course provides students with an in depth look at major issues surrounding some of the fundamentals of modern European lifestyle in Europe. The subject takes both a historical and contemporary approach, concentrating mainly, though not exclusively, on the change of habits that came out of the style revolution of the 1960s. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination EUST2012. Problems of contemporary European politics and society (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is an optional course aimed at second year undergraduate students. The course familiarises students with European political systems, examines current issues which shape public debate, and illustrates the continent's different cultural contexts. The aim of the course is not only to transmit factual knowledge about European politics and societies but also to strengthen the understanding of why Europeans act the way they do. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination EUST2020. European Studies in Europe (6 credits) (This course is offered to European Studies majors only.) This summer course, conducted for three weeks in Europe, is offered to European Studies majors between their second and third years of study. This course gives students a direct experience of the culture and politics of parts of Europe. In addition to visiting a number of European countries we will be visiting key political European institutions in Brussels and Strasburg, and attending lectures by their representatives. We will also be hearing lectures from political analysts, university lecturers and representatives of other organizations. There will also be a range of cultural activities including visiting historical sites, museums, and art galleries. Assessment: 100% coursework EUST2030. The modern imagination in Europe (6 credits) 128 (This course is also offered to third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is an introduction to the modern imagination and changing aesthetic sensibility in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Europe. It emphasises some of the major stylistic innovations and intellectual currents that have transformed the way in which Europeans (and now increasingly the world at large) perceive and shape the world around them. The course combines examples from literature (including drama), visual art and film. We will explore how the styles, currents and works we are studying have emerged as creative responses to the great upheavals that have taken place in European society with the rise of modernity. Assessment: 100% coursework EUST3003. European Studies dissertation (12 credits) Students in this course will be expected to submit a written dissertation based on research into an aspect of European politics, history, culture, or economics. The dissertation must be supervised by a teacher, either in European Studies or in another department of the university. Students enrolled in this course may not enroll in EUST3004. Assessment: 100% coursework EUST3004. European Studies research project (6 credits) Students in this course pursue independent research and produce a research paper under the supervision of a teacher, either in European Studies or in another department of the university. Students enrolled in this course may not enroll in EUST3003. Assessment: 100% coursework EUST3010. European political and economic institutions and processes (6 credits) (This course is also offered to third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course, which is required of all European Studies majors in their third year, will further familiarise students with the major international economic and political institutions in Europe such as the European Union and NATO. The organisation of the institutions will be explored along with the processes by which decisions are made and changes can be introduced. Included in the syllabus will be an examination of Europe in the international setting. Taught within a seminar type framework, students will be encouraged to select, in consultation with a staff member, subject areas within the area of focus for deeper examination. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination EUST3011. European values in conflict (6 credits) (This course is also offered to third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) While Western Europe has presently experienced a rare if not completely unprecedented period of prolonged peace, that peace is far from being assured as it faces serious divisions along ethnic, religious, cultural and political lines. We will be examining the hot spots and flash points today in Europe by taking account of the deep historical roots of these problems. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination EUST3012. The EU as a global actor and Sino-European relations (6 credits) This is an optional course aimed at final year undergraduate students. The course sheds light on the 129 history of the EU and the mechanisms and institutions through which it frames and administers its external relations. It also explores the problems and challenges the EU faces in making its voice heard in global affairs with particular attention being paid to the relations between the EU and China. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50%examination Compulsory Courses JAPN1011. Introduction to Japanese studies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Introduction to Japanese studies aims to provide a broad-based description of Japanese society and culture. The course will cover various different aspects of Japan, such as history, geography, politics and government, religion and literature. Students will be assigned to a tutorial group either in the first or second semester. This course is available primarily for those Arts Faculty students who enrol in Japanese language, but students from other faculties may also take the course subject to available places. Assessment: 100% coursework (presentations, essay assignments, etc). JAPN1088. Japanese language I (Part 1) (9 credits) This introductory course is designed for total beginners in the study of the Japanese language. The fundamentals of the Japanese language are presented through a carefully graded syllabus. To cultivate overall Japanese-language ability, emphasis will be placed equally in developing all the four basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Assessment: 100% coursework (including tests, quizzes, assignments/class performance and final oral test). N.B. For pedagogical reasons, some of the classes in this course will be taught in Cantonese. Non-Cantonese speakers should ensure that they are in a class taught through the medium of English. Since Chinese characters will not be specifically taught but will be an integrated part of the course, students who have no prior knowledge of Chinese characters should seek the advice of their teacher at the beginning of the semester. JAPN1099. Japanese language I (Part 2) (9 credits) This elementary Japanese course continues to focus on proficiency-based foreign language learning, developing the students' overall Japanese-language ability established in Part 1. While the focus is on a thorough understanding of basic Japanese grammar, it also aims to develop communicative competence in a diversity of situations. At the end of the course, the successful learner's proficiency level should reach a level of proficiency adequate for the transition to higher-level Japanese studies in the second year. Assessment: 100% coursework (including tests, quizzes, assignments/class performance, and final oral test). Prerequisite: JAPN1088 Japanese language I (Part 1) N.B. Since Chinese characters will not be specifically taught but will be an integrated part of the course, students who have no prior knowledge of Chinese characters should seek the advice of their teacher at the beginning of the semester. JAPN1188. Japanese language II (Part 1) (6 credits) 130 This course is open to first year students who have learnt Japanese for approximately 150 hours in other institutions prior to entering HKU, or who already have a level of Japanese proficiency equivalent to students who have successfully completed the course JAPN1099 Japanese Language I ( Part 2) at the time they are admitted to HKU. This course covers elementary Japanese grammar, and aims to provide students with fundamental Japanese language ability in the four skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Assessment: 100% coursework (including tests, quizzes and assignments). JAPN1199. Japanese language II (Part 2) (6 credits) This course is a continuation of JAPN1188 Japanese Language II (Part 1). The course is open to first year students who have successfully completed JAPN1188, or first year students who have equivalent level of Japanese language abilities. Basic grammar will be completely covered, and intermediate grammar will be introduced gradually towards the end of the course. At the end of the course, the successful learner should have acquired the necessary Japanese language abilities and study skills to lead to intermediate level of Japanese proficiency and increased autonomous learning in the third year. Assessment: 100% coursework (including tests, quizzes and assignments). Prerequisite: JAPN1188 Japanese language II (Part 1) Optional Course JAPN1009. Introduction to Japanese linguistics (6 credits) (This course is also offered to first year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course is an introductory linguistics course with particular reference to the Japanese language. The language will be viewed from both diachronic and synchronic perspectives and frequent cross linguistic comparisons are made with Cantonese, Mandarin and English. The purpose is to stimulate interest in this particular language and facilitate the acquisitional process while promoting general understanding of human language behaviour, which is deemed important to the interested second language learner. Assessment: 100% coursework (reading assignment summaries, test, presentation, midterm paper and term project). Second Year Courses JAPN2002. Japan in Japanese (6 credits) This tutorial-based language-intensive course is primarily a reading course only offered to secondyear students who have successfully completed JAPN1088 Japanese language I (Part 1) and JAPN1099 Japanese language I (Part 2). The course aims to develop the students' reading skills through guided readings on Japanese culture and society. As the students learn to read more fluently, they also become aware of and enhance their knowledge of Japanese culture, and improve their linguistic skills. Assessment: 100% coursework (weekly assignments, vocabulary quizzes, comprehension tests, project work (short report and presentation)). Prerequisite: JAPN1099 Japanese language I (Part 2) or JAPN1199 Japanese language II (Part 2) JAPN2007. Modern Japanese short stories (6 credits) 131 This is a tutorial-based language-intensive course for second year students the students. It aims to introduce students to the richness of Japanese literature, through careful study of a number of modern short stories. Students will be required to read original Japanese texts written by representative writers. Themes and ideas in the stories will be thoroughly discussed. Literary styles and techniques of different writers will be analysed and contrasted in order to enhance students' analytical power and critical thinking. Another aim of the course is to improve students' reading and speaking skills through literary appreciation and discussion. Grammatical explanation will be given in class in order to facilitate understanding. Assessment: 100% coursework (tests, presentation(s) and essay assignment). Prerequisite: JAPN1099 Japanese language I (Part 2) or JAPN2118 Japanese language III (Part 1) and JAPN2119 Japanese language III (Part 2) JAPN2008. Translation I (Japanese into English) (6 credits) (This course is also offered to third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This language-intensive course aims to provide students with skills in translating Japanese texts into English. Students will have the opportunity to learn how to analyse Japanese sentences in detail and translate them accurately into idiomatic English. We start with simple texts which are chosen to demonstrate a variety of sentence structures, and gradually we progress to more complicated texts, dealing with topics studied in some of the content courses. Various types of special vocabulary and style will be introduced as the course progresses. Students will be expected to prepare for class by working on the texts before coming to class. There will be a number of written assignments in which the students will have to analyse sentence structures and prepare written translations of short texts. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. Examination: A two-hour written examination at the end of the second semester. Prerequisite: JAPN1099 Japanese language I (Part 2) or JAPN1199 Japanese language II (Part 2) or JAPN3055 Japanese language II(b) (Part 2) Corequisite: JAPN2088 Japanese language II (Part 1) and JAPN2099 Japanese language II (Part 2) or JAPN2118 Japanese language III (Part 1) and JAPN2119 Japanese language III (Part 2) or JAPN3066 Japanese language III(a) (Part 1) and JAPN3077 Japanese language III(a) (Part 2) JAPN2009. Translation I (Chinese/Japanese, Japanese/Chinese) (6 credits) This language-intensive course aims to provide students with basic skills in translating Japanese texts into Chinese and vice versa. Students will translate short, simple texts, chosen to illustrate various sentence patterns in Chinese and Japanese. Texts with more complex structures with a variety of vocabulary and style will gradually be introduced to build up students' skills. Students will be familiarised with a number of reference tools useful in Chinese/Japanese translation and will use them in their work. Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination. Examination: A two-hour written examination at the end of the second semester. Corequisite: JAPN2088 Japanese language II (Part 1) and JAPN2099 Japanese language II (Part 2) or JAPN2118 Japanese language III (Part 1) and JAPN2119 Japanese language III (Part 2) JAPN2032. The changing image of Hong Kong in Japanese writings (6 credits) This is a tutorial-based language-intensive course for second year students. Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, numerous Japanese travellers visited Hong Kong for various purposes. As a highly modernized city with a colonial atmosphere, Hong Kong made a very strong impression on these 132 travellers. Japanese records and articles about Hong Kong are thus abundant. In this course, representative passages will be selected and studied in their original texts. Through reading these materials, we aim to enhance students' understanding of Hong Kong-Japan relations. Typical images or views of Japanese people on Hong Kong will be investigated in association with their background. Events such as anti-Japan riots, the Diaoyutai issue and the phenomenon of the popularity of Japanese culture among youngsters, which have significant influence on Hong Kong-Japan relations, will be looked at and discussed. As a language-intensive course, we also aim to improve the students' reading capacity by exposing them to various styles of writings. Writing techniques and the presentation of argument will also be noted to strengthen the students' analytical power and critical thinking. Assessment: 100% coursework (quizzes, presentation(s) and essay assignment). JAPN2088. Japanese language II (Part 1) (6 credits) This course is a continuation of JAPN1099 Japanese language I (Part 2), and covers elementary Japanese grammar. It is a balanced course involving reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension. The course aims to provide students with fundamental Japanese language ability. Assessment: 100% coursework (including tests, quizzes, and assignments). Prerequisite: JAPN1099 Japanese language I (Part 2) or equivalent N.B. This course is designed for students who have studied only part of elementary Japanese grammar. Students with special/additional Japanese language background ( e.g. Those who have attended language courses outside the university, have lived in Japan, or have Japanese parents) should consult the teachers first to determine the suitability of taking the course. Students may be required to take a qualifying examination. JAPN2099. Japanese language II (Part 2) (6 credits) This course is a continuation of JAPN2088 Japanese language II (Part 1), and basic grammar will be completely covered. More training will be provided to enable the students to successfully use the basic grammar already learnt to express themselves in natural and fluent Japanese. Real everyday learning materials will be used to encourage autonomous learning. At the end of the course, the successful learner should have acquired the necessary Japanese language ability and study skills to lead to intermediate level of Japanese proficiency and increased autonomous learning in the third year. Assessment: 100% coursework (including tests, quizzes, and assignments). Prerequisite: JAPN2088 Japanese language II (Part 1) N.B. This course is designed for students who have studied only part of elementary Japanese grammar. Students with special/additional Japanese language background (e.g. Those who have attended language courses outside the university, have lived in Japan, or have Japanese parents) should consult the teachers first to determine the suitability of taking the course. Students may be required to take a qualifying examination. JAPN2036. Japanese text analysis (3 credits) The course will use a variety of samples of short Japanese texts which will be read and explained in interactive tutorials. The course objectives are to train students in grammatical and textual analysis of Japanese texts. The aim is to enhance students' understanding of complex grammatical structures, to enable students to analyse and differentiate among different text types, and to grasp the textual elements that ensure the cohesion and coherence of a text. The course has no text book apart from material prepared (and put on WebCT) by the teacher. Students are however expected to use reference 133 works on Japanese grammar as well as dictionaries. This course is a prerequisite for taking JAPN3007 Translation II - Japanese English in the third year. Assessment: 100% coursework (50% participation, 50% tests and assignments). JAPN2037. Interpretation I (Putonghua and Cantonese Japanese) (6 credits) This elementary course in interpretation is skill-oriented (listening and speaking) with a focus on rendering Putonghua or Cantonese into simple Japanese and vice versa. This course is designed for those who had no previous Japanese training before they were admitted to JAPN1088 Japanese language I (Part 1). A variety of carefully graded teaching material is selected to enhance comprehension and facilitate immediate response in the target language. This course places emphasis on the interpretation of a heard message and the expression of one's intention, not on grammaticality. Assessment: 100% coursework (oral presentation, listening quizzes, individual assessment) Prerequisite: JAPN1099 Japanese language I (Part 2) (with no Japanese language training prior to JAPN1088 Japanese language I (Part 1)) JAPN2038. Interpretation II (Putonghua and Cantonese Japanese) (6 credits) This continuation course from Interpretation I will further enhance students' ability in the reception and production of the target language. Assessment: 100% coursework (oral presentation, listening quizzes, individual assessment) Prerequisite: JAPN2037 Interpretation I (Putonghua and Cantonese Japanese) (with no Japanese language training prior to JAPN1088 Japanese language I (Part 1)) Third Year Courses JAPN3003. Selected readings in Japanese studies (6 credits) This tutorial-based language-intensive course provides an opportunity to read and discuss prescribed Japanese texts in a specific field of Japanese Studies, and is open to third year students who have successfully completed JAPN2088 Japanese language II (Part 1) and JAPN2099 Japanese language II (Part 2) and at least one language-intensive course. The texts are selected with a view to improving the level of Japanese language proficiency of the third year students. Assessment: 100% coursework (short quizzes, presentation(s) and essay assignment). Prerequisite: JAPN2099 Japanese language II (Part 2) or JAPN2119 Japanese language III (Part2) JAPN3004. Contemporary Japanese fiction (6 credits) This Japanese-medium interdisciplinary content course looks at selected works of fiction written by postwar Japanese writers. Students will be expected to read, understand and analyse representative works of the writers in their original Japanese. Themes, literary techniques and styles of the various fictional works used in the course will be critically discussed in order to help students understand and enjoy Japanese literature in greater depth. Assessment: 100% coursework (discussions and essay assignment). Corequisite: JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part 1) or JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part 2) JAPN3005. Media Japanese (6 credits) 134 This advanced language-intensive course is designed for the students who are enrolled in JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part 1) or JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part 2)to further enhance their listening ability of the Japanese language by means of intensive listening to the current Japanese news programme primarily internet television and radio. Heavy emphasis will be placed on current affairs in Japan. Assessment: 100% coursework (quizzes). Corequisite: JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part 1) or JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part 2) JAPN3006. Extended essay in Japanese studies (9 credits) This interdisciplinary content course may be taken only by third year students who have taken at least 54 credits as part of their BA in Japanese Studies, and who wish to specialize in a particular topic. This topic is to be selected, approved, and discussed under the tutorial guidance of a supervisor, before being written up in either English or Japanese as an extended research essay. The minimum length required is 8,000 words in English, or 10,000 Japanese characters. Assessment: 100% coursework. JAPN3007. Translation II - Japanese English (6 credits) This advanced translation course aims to help students acquire the necessary skills and strategies to be able to render a variety of Japanese texts into appropriate English. The first objective of the course is to improve the students' competence in both the original language (Japanese) and the target language (English). Students are expected to acquire the necessary grammatical and analytical tools to reach a grammatically and semantically correct understanding of the Japanese text. This objective will be attained through practical exercises in translating Japanese texts into English, both in class and as homework. The second objective is to introduce the students to a number of translation strategies and concepts which can help them evaluate their own translations and those of others. Various approaches to translation and their appropriateness for different types of texts will be discussed. This objective will be reached through lectures, handouts, and practical exercises in evaluating particular translations in terms of the theories introduced. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. Examination: A two-hour written examination at the end of the second semester. Prerequisite: JAPN2008 Translation I (Japanese into English) or JAPN2036 Japanese text analysis JAPN3008. Contemporary Japanese popular music (6 credits) This Japanese-medium interdisciplinary content course looks at the contemporary Japanese popular music scene since World War Two. The main approach used will be anthropological rather than musicological or ethno-musicological. The course will take a close look at how the Japanese popular music industry was established and developed. It will also examine how the images of particular popular singers and songs were constructed by the music industry, and then revised to take account of the response of audiences. We will also explore the social and historical situation in which the popularity of a particular singer and song reflects. Assessment: 100% coursework (assignment, quiz and test). Corequisite: JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part 1) or JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part2) 135 JAPN3009. Japanese film (6 credits) This Japanese-medium interdisciplinary content course introduces contemporary Japanese filmmakers (e.g. Iwai Shunji, Kitano Takeshi, etc.) and their works. Students will read part of scenarios of their major films, watch the films (with Japanese, English and/or Chinese subtitle) and discuss them all in Japanese. The course aims to enhance the students' skills of reading/listening/watching Japanese films and their scenarios, to provide them with the basic knowledge about Japanese films and their makers and to offer opportunities to discuss on Japanese films in Japanese. Assessment: 100% coursework (essay and discussions). Corequisite: JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part 1) or JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part 2) JAPN3010. Translation II (Chinese/Japanese, Japanese/Chinese) (6 credits) This language-intensive course is a continuation of JAPN2009 Translation I (Chinese/Japanese, Japanese/Chinese). It aims to further develop students' skills in translating more complex passages written in Japanese and Chinese. Passages will be chosen from established sources in Chinese and Japanese covering various topics and subjects. Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination. Examination: A two-hour written examination at the end of the second semester. Corequisite: JAPN2118 Japanese language III (Part 1) and JAPN2119 Japanese language III (Part 2) or JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part1) and JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part2). JAPN3011. Japanese in popular culture (6 credits) This language-intensive course introduces a variety of Japanese found in fairy tales, children's songs, TV programmes, magazines, manga, anime, popular songs, poems and others. The course aims to provide the students with an opportunity to expose themselves to the various forms of Japanese and to enhance their Japanese language ability. Assessment: 100% coursework (short quizzes, presentations and essay assignments) Prerequisite: JAPN2099 Japanese language II (Part 2) or JAPN2119 Japanese language III (Part2) JAPN3014. Project in Japanese business (6 credits) This interdisciplinary content course is designed to integrate the student's knowledge of the Japanese language, society and culture, and to apply that knowledge to a practical internship with a Japanese business organization. Through a short-term internship, the student will gain real life experience dealing with Japanese managers while perfecting his or her communication and interpersonal skills in a Japanese business environment. Following the internship, the students will analyse and report in an essay the problems that he or she has encountered in light of theoretical frameworks. Assessment: 100% coursework (Proposal, Project, and Essay). Prerequisite: Either JAPN2099 Japanese language II (Part 2) or JAPN1199 Japanese language II (Part2) and at least one language-intensive course and two interdisciplinary content courses. JAPN3015. Business Japanese I (3 credits) This is a language-intensive course for third year students. There is one class a week. The class will 136 concentrate on basic skills for spoken business Japanese and on the appropriate behavior that needs to accompany it. Students will learn language styles, vocabulary, and phraseology to deal with a variety of business situations. Those who are enrolled in JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part 1) or JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part 2) cannot take this course. Assessment: 100% coursework (assignments, quizzes, and oral interview test) JAPN3016. Advanced business Japanese (6 credits) This is an advanced language-intensive course for the students who are enrolled in JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part 2). There are two classes a week. One class will concentrate on reading and understanding business correspondence and other business documents. Students will learn the formats required in Japanese business correspondence, and how to structure business correspondence on a variety of topics. They will increase their knowledge of formal honorific written Japanese, as well as specialized business vocabulary, in order to allow them to understand and compose these documents. The second class will go beyond the basics of spoken business Japanese and focus on more advanced interactive skills. Students will learn appropriate language styles, vocabulary, and phraseology to deal with a variety of business situations. Assessment: 100% coursework (assignments, written/ oral quizzes, discussions, and presentations). Corequisite: JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part 1) or JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part 2). JAPN3020. Advanced translation, Japanese to Chinese (6 credits) This language-intensive course aims to promote students' skills in translating Japanese texts into Chinese. Through discussions and regular practices, students will learn about the subtleties and complexities of Japanese expressions, and how to render them into fluent Chinese. To familiarize students with different genres of writings, various kinds of Japanese texts, for example newspaper articles, literary works etc. will be introduced. A small translation project will be incorporated to enhance language competence and translation skills. Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination. Examination: A two-hour written examination at the end of the second semester. Corequisite: JAPN2118 Japanese language III (Part 1) and JAPN2119 Japanese language III (Part 2) or JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part1) and JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part2). JAPN3021. Communication and society (6 credits) This Japanese-medium interdisciplinary content course explores the social behaviour of Japanese people that is embedded in their language use. A sociolinguistic approach to Japanese culture is promoted through students' active participation in the empirical analyses of language variation such as dialects, gender difference, and age markers. Coursework also includes the examination of problems that frequently occur in cross-cultural communication. Assessment: 100% coursework (project, presentation, journal writing, essays). Corequisite: JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part 1) or JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part 2). JAPN3044. Japanese language II(b) (Part 1) (3 credits) This course is a continuation of JAPN2055 Japanese language I(b) (Part 2). It aims to provide a quick and effective way to learn essential Japanese, thereby establishing a solid foundation for study 137 of Japanese at a higher level. To make the most of the course, students must commit themselves to working outside the classroom, for example, memorizing the new vocabulary and doing the weekly written and listening exercises. The course is open to third year students of the Faculty of Arts. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: JAPN2055 Japanese language I(b) (Part 2) or equivalent JAPN3055. Japanese language II(b) (Part 2) (3 credits) This course is a continuation of JAPN3044 Japanese language II(b) (Part 1). It aims to consolidate what students have learned in JAPN3044 Japanese language II(b) (Part 1). To make most of the course, students must commit themselves to working outside the classroom, for example, memorizing the new vocabulary and doing the weekly written and listening exercises. The course is open to third year students of the Faculty of Arts who have completed and passed the examination of JAPN3044 Japanese language II(b) (Part 1). Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: JAPN3044 Japanese language II(b) (Part 1) or equivalent JAPN3066. Japanese language III(a) (Part 1) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This language course is open to students who have successfully completed JAPN3055 Japanese language II(b) (Part 2). The course provides further training for the students to obtain a balanced range of language skills. In addition, the course is designed to enhance students' understanding of Japanese society and culture so that they can use the obtained skills appropriately. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: JAPN3055 Japanese language II(b) (Part 2) or equivalent JAPN3077. Japanese language III(a) (Part 2) (3 credits) (This course is also offered to third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a continuation of JAPN3066 Japanese language III(a) (Part 1). It aims to consolidate students' Japanese knowledge through oral practices and other classroom activities, and further develop their language skills. This course is open to students who have successfully completed JAPN3066 Japanese language III(a) (Part 1) . Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: JAPN3066 Japanese language III(a) (Part 1) or equivalent JAPN3188. Japanese language IV (Part 1) (6 credits) This language course is designed for students who took part in one-year exchange programmes in Japan or who have similar levels of proficiency in Japanese. Students in the Special Honours stream in Japanese Studies are required to complete the course. The course integrates the four language skills, listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and its aim is to help students achieve upper-advanced levels of Japanese proficiency. JAPN3188 mainly focuses on the training of language skills necessary for the course assignments that are scheduled in the following JAPN3199 Japanese language IV (Part 2). Credit transfer for this course is not accepted. 100% coursework (classroom performance 30%, homework 30%, quizzes 20%, final report 20%) Prerequisite: Course instructors' approval. Assessment: 138 JAPN3199. Japanese language IV (Part 2) (6 credits) This language course is designed for students who took part in one-year exchange programs in Japan or who have similar levels of proficiency in Japanese. The students who wish to be in the Special Honours stream in Japanese Studies are required to complete the course. The course introduces handson activities so that students can put the items learned in the previous JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part 1) in practical use. Credit transfer for this course is not accepted. Assessment: Prerequisite: 100% coursework (classroom performance 30%, homework 20%, project 50%) JAPN3188 Japanese language IV (Part 1) and Course instructors' approval. Second and Third Year Courses JAPN2003. Introduction to Japanese literature (6 credits) This general survey interdisciplinary content course deals with Japanese novels, poems, and plays. The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of the historical development of Japanese literature. The course covers Japanese myth, monogatari, waka, renga, and haiku. Assessment: 100% coursework (tests, presentation(s) and essay assignment). Prerequisite: Basic Japanese language knowledge is required. JAPN2010. Japanese business: an anthropological introduction (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This interdisciplinary content course - taught by lectures and tutorials - focuses on various aspects of Japanese business. It is particularly concerned with the social organization and culture of the Japanese salaryman, and deals with such varied topics as company socialization, decision-making, management procedures, gender relations, leisure activities, sake drinking, and so on. The course is open to both second- and third-year students of Japanese Studies, as well as to students from other departments and faculties who may have an academic interest in its contents. Assessment: 100% coursework (group projects & final essays). JAPN2011. Anthropology of Japan (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This interdisciplinary content course - taught by lectures and tutorials - is designed to provide undergraduate students specializing in Japanese Studies with a comprehensive introduction to, and understanding of, certain aspects of contemporary Japanese society. As such it will focus on such themes as comics, tourism, sexuality, and TV dramas. Assessment: 100% coursework (group projects & final essays). JAPN2014. China and Japan (6 credits) This interdisciplinary content course will examine the history of Chinese-Japanese relations in the context of East Asian world order up to the early twentieth century. Attention will be paid to the fact that the transfer of Chinese culture from China to Japan throughout history has been as much a 139 political process as a cultural one both for China and Japan. The reverse flow of `acquired' Western culture from Meiji Japan to China in the early twentieth century will also be examined in some detail in order to provide a comparative perspective on the modernization of the two countries. Students must be able to read Chinese. A knowledge of Japanese will be helpful. Assessment: 100% coursework (presentations and essays). JAPN2015. Japanese enterprise groupings (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This interdisciplinary content course - taught by lectures and tutorials - concentrates on the study of Japanese enterprise groupings. It will start with three major theoretical perspectives on economic organizations - structural, strategic, and institutional - to enable students to theoretically understand Japanese enterprise groupings. The histories of different enterprise groupings, their operation, and the function these groupings serve will then be examined. As such it will focus on such topics as the special roles of main banks, general trading firms, insurance companies, core member corporations of the groupings, and the so-called preferential trading between core large corporations and their peripheral companies. Finally, the discussion of these topics will be placed in the context of Japanese and American trade conflicts so that students can have a general understanding of the conflicts. Assessment: 100% coursework (group projects & final essays). JAPN2016. Comparative linguistics: Cantonese and Japanese I Comparative phonology (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This interdisciplinary content course will detail the phonological components of Japanese and Cantonese through extensive reading of current theories and a contrastive analysis. Besides construing both common and specific traits of the sound system of human languages, the course will help students familiarize themselves with the most common sets of transcription used in language studies which include the most important one, the International Phonetic Alphabets (IPA). Assessment: 100% coursework (a series of transcription tests and a final project on comparative studies). Prerequisite: JAPN1099 Japanese language I (Part 2), JAPN2055 Japanese language I(b) (Part 2) or Certificate Japanese Courses JAPN2018. Popular culture and artistic activity in Japan (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This interdisciplinary content course looks at various aspects of art and popular culture in Japan. It will mainly focus on contemporary Japan, looking at (for example) television, manga (comics), music, tea ceremony, and ceramic art. The main approach used will be anthropological/ sociological. We will look at the production and consumption of art and popular culture. How is it produced, by whom, and for whom? Who engages in these artistic or cultural activities, how, and why? We will ask what we can learn about Japanese society by looking at the way cultural and artistic activities are organized and engaged in. We will also look at some examples of art and popular culture in contemporary Japan such as comics and television dramas and ask what these texts tell us about Japanese society. Possibilities for coursework include the analysis of such texts and their penetration into other East Asian societies, including Hong Kong. However, it should be noted that a high standard of analysis will be demanded and the theoretical content is significant. 140 Assessment: 100% coursework (two essays, oral presentation and tutorial participation) JAPN2024. Comparative linguistics: Cantonese and Japanese III Syntactic features and pedagogical implications (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This interdisciplinary content course firstly focuses on theoretical discussion of grammatical peculiarities of the two languages in question, from the perspective as two rather distinctively typed natural languages of the world. Next, they are examined and contrasted in relation to potential problem areas when they are respectively considered as the source language as well as the target language in the course of acquisition, i.e. for Cantonese native speakers learning Japanese, and vice versa. Assessment: 100% coursework (assessment portfolio including lecture and reading summaries, tests presentation and term paper). JAPN2026. Japanese language III extended (6 credits) This language-intensive course is designed for students who have spent one year studying in Japan or who have a similar level of proficiency in Japanese*. The course introduces activities that integrate the four language skills, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Coursework assignments include discussions, role-plays, debating, summarizing written documents, expressing opinions in essays, oral presentations, etc. Some of the topics covered in the course are: self-improvement, cultural comparisons, social issues, and international relations. (* For these students, a recommendation from a teacher of Japanese Studies programme is required). Assessment: 100% coursework (classroom performance, homework, project). JAPN2027. Comparative linguistics: Cantonese and Japanese II Phonological transfer and pedagogy in foreign language acquisition (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Potential areas of native language interference in the acquisition of the pronunciation system in a foreign language are illustrated by native speakers of Cantonese and Japanese. Theoretical discussions and knowledge in JAPN2016 Comparative linguistics: Cantonese and Japanese I are used as a basis for training students to predict areas of interference in this interdisciplinary content course. Languages such as English, Mandarin, French and Korean will be cited for relevant reference. Assessment: 100% coursework (tutorial tasks, test, and a final project on pedagogy). Prerequisite: JAPN2016 Comparative linguistics: Cantonese and Japanese I - Comparative phonology JAPN2029. Japanese popular music and Hong Kong society (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This interdisciplinary content course introduces the way in which Japanese popular music was integrated into the Hong Kong music scene in the 1980s when the influence of Japanese popular music became highly visible. To do so, firstly we will take a close look at the popular music scene in Japan in the 1970s and the 1980s. Secondly, we will examine how socio-political developments in 141 Hong Kong shaped the characteristics of the local popular music industry and affected the way it has selected, imported, and distributed Japanese popular music. Furthermore, the course will look at the changes in the way Japanese popular music was consumed in Hong Kong from the 1990s to the present. By so doing, it aims to give the students an introduction to the contemporary popular music scene in Hong Kong and Japan. The main approach used will be social scientific rather than musicological. Assessment: 100% coursework (quiz, test and essay). JAPN2030. Japanese business, culture and communication (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This interdisciplinary content course focuses on intercultural communication involving Japanese professionals. We will explore how and why members of different groups misunderstand each other in spoken, written and electronically mediated communication. We will consider the ways in which people use language to claim and to display their own complex and multiple identities. Rather than imposing one style on all Japanese or Chinese people, we will take a situation-based approach to professional communication across cultures. Assessment: 100% coursework (projects, presentations and essays) JAPN2031. The media and Japan (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This interdisciplinary content course introduces students to the workings of the electronic media in Japan. We will focus on the following three areas: coverage of the Hong Kong handover; TV documentary programmes on international affairs; and Japanese TV entertainment programmes available in Hong Kong. We will examine how the Japanese media covered the 1997 handover in comparison with other international media organisations. Students will then watch and analyse feature-length documentaries that influenced subsequent decisions of Japanese Government officials. In addition, we will consider how Hong Kong Chinese have distributed and consumed Japanese cartoons, dramas and entertainment shows since the 1970s. Assessment: 100% coursework (projects, presentations and essays) JAPN2034. Education in contemporary Japanese society (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Education in contemporary Japan has been both praised for being child-centred and humanistic, and criticized as pressurized and exam-focused. This course tries to sort out the myths from the realities. We look at education from preschools to high schools, and find out how serious problems like bullying and exam pressure really are. We also ask if Japanese education gives all children an equal chance, and look at how Japanese children who have lived overseas cope when they return. A visit to the Japanese schools in Hong Kong is arranged as part of the course, allowing those who take the course to see Japanese education with their own eyes. Assessment: 100% coursework (two essays, oral presentation and class participation) JAPN2035. Women in Japan and Hong Kong (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening 142 purposes.) This course aims to provide students with an overall knowledge of gender issues in contemporary Japan and Hong Kong. It aims to help students develop an awareness of gender issues in daily life in their own society, as well as to gain knowledge of the historical and cultural background for modern gender roles. The course encourages students to form independent opinions and ideas and to present them cogently and persuasively in speech and writing. Students are also expected to reflect on their own gender role and their assumptions about gender differences, as well as gender discrimination in their own society. Through lectures and tutorials we shall explore various sides of women's lives in Japan while comparing with Hong Kong. Assessment: 100% coursework (a research project, reflections, presentations, participation in group discussions) JAPN2039. Negotiation and conflict resolution: a cross-cultural perspective (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to some powerful frameworks for analyzing and preparing for negotiations and for resolving conflicts. Students get practice applying these frameworks through inclass simulations and role plays. The class utilizes numerous cross-cultural cases and readings (particularly concerning Japan and mainland China) to help students develop an awareness of how the cultural context and the cultural background of negotiators could influence negotiations. Assessment: 100% course work (class participation, negotiation planning documents, class diary and research paper or book review) JAPN2040. Understanding Japanese business through novels (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will introduce students to some economic or business novels translated into English. By understanding the feelings, attitudes and personalities of a wide variety of literary characters students should be able to gain insights into the drama of working life from a Japanese perspective. They should also gain a deeper understanding of how certain significant economic events have impacted companies and their employees. Assessment: 100% course work (class participation, two analytical essays) Prerequisite: none, although JAPN2010 or a prior knowledge of Japanese business or the Japanese economy would be helpful. JAPN2044. Japanese language I(b) (Part 1) (3 credits) This course is open to second and third year BA students with no previous knowledge of the Japanese language. It aims to provide the fundamental knowledge of Japanese language and is intended to help students build basic linguistic and communicative skills in Japanese. Assessment: 100% coursework. N.B.: Since Chinese characters will not be particularly taught but will be an integral part of the course, students who have no prior knowledge of Chinese characters should seek the advice of their teacher at the beginning of the semester before the add and drop period. JAPN2055. Japanese language I(b) (Part 2) (3 credits) 143 This course is continuation of JAPN2044 Japanese language I(b) (Part 1) and provides a balanced training in reading, writing, speaking and listening to develop students' Japanese language ability established in Part 1. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: JAPN2044 Japanese language I(b) (Part 1) or equivalent N.B.: Since Chinese characters will not be particularly taught but will be an integral part of the course, students who have no prior knowledge of Chinese characters should seek the advice of their teacher at the beginning of the semester before the add and drop period. JAPN2118. Japanese language III (Part 1) (6 credits) This language course is a continuation of JAPN2099 Japanese language II (Part 2), and offers a balanced range of language skills, but with an additional emphasis on the applications of linguistic principles and methodology, and on reading skills both general and specialized. Students who took part in one-year exchange programmes in Japan cannot take this course. Credit transfer for this course is not accepted. Assessment: 100% coursework (test, quizzes, presentation, homework/portfolio) Prerequisite: JAPN2099 Japanese language II (Part 2) or JAPN1199 Japanese language II (Part 2) or equivalent. JAPN2119. Japanese language III (Part 2) (6 credits) This language course is a continuation of JAPN2118 Japanese language III (Part 1) and again offers a balanced range of language skills, but with an additional emphasis on the applications of linguistic principles and methodology, and on reading skills both general and specialized. Students who took part in one-year exchange programmes in Japan cannot take this course. Credit transfer for this course is not accepted. Assessment: 100% coursework (test, quizzes, presentation, homework/portfolio) Prerequisite: JAPN2118 Japanese language III (Part 1) SCHOOL OF MODERN LANGUAGES AND CULTURE Arabic Courses First Year LANG1036. Arabic for beginners - Part I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to teach complete beginners the basics of Arabic with respect to the four linguistic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will also be introduced to the cultures and societies of the Arabic speaking world. Vocabulary and grammar will be presented in a communicative way for a variety of situations, e.g. making introductions, leave-taking, giving directions, buying things, making telephone calls and so on. The emphasis will be on the spoken language, as well as on providing a foundation of basic Arabic script. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG1037. Arabic for beginners - Part II (6 credits) 144 (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a continuation of Arabic for beginners Part I. Pre-requisite: Arabic for beginners Part I. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. Second Year LANG2052. Arabic II (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and is a continuation of Arabic for beginners Part II. The aim of this course is to build further on the junior level work and widen the scope of exposure to more complex aspects of the language. The teaching will diversify through the use of more elaborate materials and a variety of teaching techniques including work with authentic audiovisual resources. Participants are expected to consolidate their understanding of Arabic and develop further their production and reception skills. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Arabic II without having previously completed Arabic for beginners Part II will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: One examination and a coursework element which shall count 60% and 40% respectively of the final grade awarded. Examination: The examination for Arabic II consists of one written paper of 2-hour duration and a separate oral examination. Third Year LANG3049. Arabic III (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and continues to build on the two previous years' work on a more advanced level. The intention is to lead participants towards a fairly comprehensive understanding of Arabic language features through the study of a variety of documents (written, audio and video). The selection of documents will also serve as a basis for discussion on some social issues regarding the contemporary Arabic-speaking world, as well as the history and cultural backgrounds. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Arabic III without having previously completed Arabic II 2 will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: One examination and a coursework element which shall count 60% and 40% respectively of the final grade awarded. Examination: The examination for Arabic III consists of one written paper of 3-hour duration and a separate oral examination. LANG3050. Arabic in an Arabic-speaking country (3 credits) This course is taught and organized by several Middle Eastern universities and teaching institutions during the summer between the 2nd and 3rd Year of the Arabic B.A. programme. The course lasts about three to four weeks and is designed to build on and to reinforce the language competence acquired during the first two years of study. This course should also prepare the participants for more advanced work in the final year. 145 Prerequisite: Assessment: Students must have completed LANG2052 (Arabic II), or establish that they have attained a similar standard. 100% coursework. In order to be granted credits for this course, participants will be requested to produce a statement with the mention of a grade from the host institution. French Courses First Year LANG1001. French I.1 (6 credits) This course is intended for complete beginners in French and does not require any previous knowledge of the language. Participants will acquire a basic knowledge in the four areas of competence (listening, speaking, reading and writing) with a particular emphasis on communicative skills. Classes will be conducted in small groups in order to ensure a high degree of interactivity between participants and teachers. Conversation groups and laboratory groups will also be arranged separately on a regular basis. Prerequisite: Nil Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG1002. French I.2 (12 6 credits) This course is a continuation of French I.1. It will further develop the four areas of competence with the view of expanding students' linguistic, pronunciation and communicative skills. As in French I.1, separate conversation and laboratory groups will be arranged to complement classroom tuition. In addition, participants will be asked to make use of a range of materials available in the Centre's selfaccess facilities (which include audio, video, CD Rom and computer programmes), as well as take advantage of resources accessible through various Internet sites. Prerequisite: Students must have satisfactorily completed French I.1 or provide evidence that they have attained a comparable level elsewhere. Assessment: 100% coursework. Includes: (i) progress tests, (ii) participation in class and (iii) various assignments. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG1035. France today: an overview (3 credits) The objective of this one-semester course is to present a broad introduction to contemporary France, its geographical features, its institutions and customs, its people and society. The lectures will be arranged as a series of discussions on selected topics which will include, where needed, insights into France's history and evolution, so as to enable a better understanding of the country's identity and characteristics today. France's current relationship with, and presence in, China and Hong Kong will also be discussed. This course is essentially intended for First Year students. The medium of instruction is English, no previous knowledge of French is required. Prerequisite: Nil Assessment: 100% coursework. Second Year 146 LANG2001. French language II.1 (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and continues to build on the first-year work. It offers a balanced range of the various language skills through further syntax acquisition, reading and textual analysis, listening comprehension, composition, translation, oral expression and communicative skills. A wide variety of teaching techniques and materials is used. Small groups are arranged throughout the year to ensure maximum opportunities for interactive practice. All students intending to continue the study of French in their third year are strongly encouraged to attend a summer intensive immersion course in France. Prerequisites: (i) French II.1 is open to students who have successfully completed French I.1 and I.2. (ii) Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. Assessment: One Examination and a Coursework element which shall count respectively 60% and 40% of the final grade awarded. The Examination for French II.1 consists of one written paper of 3-hour duration and a separate oral examination. LANG2035. Introduction to French/Chinese translation Part I (3 credits) This course provides an introduction to the task of translating French into Chinese and, to a lesser extent, Chinese into French. Particular attention will be paid to the correction of common errors caused by cross-influences, especially at grammatical and syntactical levels, between French and Chinese. One important aim of this course is to consolidate and expand the participants' knowledge of the grammar of French through a comparative study with Chinese on key areas, such as verbs and tenses, syntactic placement, pronouns and prepositions. This will be done through a large array of practical exercises focused on translating selected materials from French into Chinese and vice versa. Another important objective of this course is to provide the students with good skills in basic translation techniques. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2035 is open to students who have successfully completed LANG1002 (French I.2). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2035 without enroling in LANG2001. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG2036. Introduction to French/English translation Part I (3 credits) This course provides an introduction to the task of translating French into English and, to a lesser extent, English into French. Particular attention will be paid to the correction of common errors caused by cross-influences, at grammatical and lexical levels, between French and English. One important aim of this course is to consolidate and expand the participants' knowledge of the grammar of French through a comparative study with English on key areas, such as verbs and tenses, syntactic placement, pronouns and prepositions. This will be done through a large array of practical exercises focused on translating selected materials from French into English and vice versa. Another important objective of this course is to provide students with good skills in basic translation techniques. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2036 is open to students who have successfully completed LANG1002 (French I.2). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite 147 courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2036 without enroling in LANG2001. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG2037. Introduction to French/Chinese translation Part II (3 credits) This course is a continuation of LANG2035 (Introduction to French/Chinese translation Part I) taught in the first semester. The objective is to build on the initial work and to widen the scope of investigation regarding the task of translating French into Chinese and, to a lesser extent, Chinese into French. Particular attention will be paid again to the correction of common errors caused by crossinfluences, especially at grammatical and syntactical levels, between French and Chinese. One important aim of this course is to consolidate and expand the participants' knowledge of the grammar of French through a comparative study with Chinese in key areas, such as verbs and tenses, syntactic placement, pronouns and prepositions. This will be done through a large array of practical exercises focused on translating selected materials from French into Chinese and vice versa. Another important objective of this course is to provide the students with good skills in basic translation techniques. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2037 is open to students who have successfully completed LANG2035 (Introduction to French/Chinese translation Part I) in the first semester. Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2037 without enroling in LANG2001. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG2038. Introduction to French/English translation Part II (3 credits) This course is a continuation of LANG2036 (Introduction to French/English translation Part I) taught in the first semester. The objective is to build on the initial work and to widen the scope of investigation regarding the task of translating French into English and, to a lesser extent, English into French. Particular attention will be paid again to the correction of common errors caused by crossinfluences, at grammatical and lexical levels, between French and English. One important aim of this course is to consolidate and expand the participants' knowledge of the grammar of French through a comparative study with English in key areas, such as verbs and tenses, syntactic placement, pronouns and prepositions. This will be done through a large array of practical exercises focused on translating selected materials from French into English and vice versa. Another important objective of this course is to provide students with good skills in basic translation techniques. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2038 is open to students who have successfully completed LANG2036 (Introduction to French/English translation Part I) in the first semester. Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2038 without enroling in LANG2001. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG2043. French language and culture I (3 credits) This course is designed to review key aspects of France's contemporary society and culture. The lectures will offer a concise introduction to the country's present institutions and society (government, 148 education, politics, economy, work, current affairs, etc.), and discuss essential cultural features (festivals, customs, traditions, etiquette, colloquialisms, way of life, leisure, etc.) The investigation will be supported by an array of documentation drawn from the media, video footage and web sources. This course is also meant to prepare students for the period of time they are advised to spend in the country during the summer. The teaching material used for this course will be in French, and the main medium of instruction will be French. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2043 is open is students who have successfully completed LANG1001 (French I.1) and LANG1002 (French I.2). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2043 without also enroling in LANG2001 (French II.1). Assessment: 100% coursework. This course is taught in the first semester. LANG2044. French language and culture II (3 credits) This course offers a concise description of the main stages of France's historical development. Key events that have contributed to the shaping of the country throughout its various periods will be presented and their significance discussed. The role and place of the regions within this process will also be discussed, so as to understand the correlation of distinct regional characteristics (e.g., culture, traditions, dialects, architectural heritage, religions) with related historical developments (e.g., invasions and migrations, wars and alliances, social upheavals, regionalisms). The teaching material used for this course will be in French, and the main medium of instruction will be French. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2044 is open is students who have successfully completed LANG1001 (French I.1) and LANG1002 (French I.2). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2044 without also enroling in LANG2001 (French II.1). Assessment: 100% coursework. This course is taught in the second semester. LANG2045. French speech and sounds Part I (3 credits) The general objectives of this course are as follows: i. to introduce the fundamental notions of French phonetics; ii. to account for typical pronunciation difficulties encountered by students due to the interference of French, Chinese and English, and iii. to improve students' preception and production of French sounds so as to step up their proficiency in spoken French. Class activities and tutorials will be organized in small groups. The course material will be in French, and French will be used as the medium of instruction. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2045 is open is students who have successfully completed LANG1001 (French I.1) and LANG1002 (French I.2). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2045 without also enroling in LANG2001 (French II.1). Assessment: 100% coursework. This course is taught in the first semester. LANG2046. French speech and sounds Part II (3 credits) 149 The general objectives of this course are as follows: i. to discuss important phonological aspects of the French language which generally cause difficulties of perception among students; ii. to step up students' proficiency in French with respect to the spoken and aural dimensions; and iii. to prepare students for the period of time they are advised to spend in France during the summer. Discussion topics will cover various phonological phenomena in French connected speech, such as elision and assimilation, liaison and enchanement, as well as prosodic features and their paralinguistic implications. Class activities and tutorials will be organized in small groups. The course material will be in French, and French will be the medium of instruction. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2046 is open is students who have successfully completed LANG2045 (French speech and sounds Part I). (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2046 without also enroling in LANG2001 (French II.1). Assessment: 100% coursework. This course is taught in the second semester. LANG2047. French reading course (3 credits) The objective of this course is to present and discuss a range of genres and styles of writing (literary and non-literary) so as to reinforce reading skills in French. In this process, the participants will familiarize themselves with specific forms and conventions that relate to and/or define these genres. The investigation will also lead to the analysis of how important acts of communication and types of discourses (viz., descriptive, informative, narrative, prescriptive and argumentive) may appear in these various genres and /or mutate across several genres. This course is very practical in nature and will largely rely on small group activities. The teaching material used for this course will be in French, and the main medium of instruction will be French. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2047 is open is students who have successfully completed LANG1001 (French I.1) and LANG1002 (French I.2). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2047 without also enroling in LANG2001 (French II.1). Assessment: 100% coursework. This course is taught in the second semester. LANG2048. French songs and lyrics (3 credits) This course offers a review of key authors who have marked the popular music of the Frenchspeaking world (la Chanson franaise), from the early 20th century to the present day. Through a selection of representative works, the discussion will focus on the reading of texts, their reception by the public, the social context and how, in many instances, particular song lyrics have interacted with and been incorporated into the French language. The literary nature and the cultural dimension of these lyrics will be emphasized throughout the course. Short biographies of important authors will also be examined. In this course, participants will be able to enhance their proficiency in the language and will gain more understanding of French contemporary popular culture. The teaching material used for this course will be in French, and the main medium of instruction will be French. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2048 is open is students who have successfully completed LANG1001 (French I.1) and LANG1002 (French I.2). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2048 without also enroling in LANG2001 (French II.1). 150 Assessment: 100% coursework. This course is taught in the second semester. Third Year LANG3001. French language III.1 (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year in lectures and tutorials and continues to build on the firstand second-year work. Lectures will make use of literary texts and authentic documents (press clippings, etc.) from France and other French-speaking countries, with the aim of stimulating critical reading. This study of authentic materials will also help students to investigate further French civilization and contemporary culture. Prerequisite: (i) French III.1 is open to students who have successfully completed French II.1 (ii) Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. Assessment: One Examination and a Coursework element which shall count respectively 60% and 40% of the final grade awarded. The Examination for French III.1 consists of one written paper of 3-hour duration and a separate oral examination. LANG3003. French/English translation: practical skills (3 credits) The objective of this course is to reinforce students' language skills in French while making them aware of problems arising from transferring meaning from French to English and conversely. Most of the work will focus on common translation difficulties between the two languages and will propose various ways of dealing with them. This course, very practical in nature, will make use of materials drawn from various sources, e.g., literature, press articles, movies, bilingual documents, business correspondence etc. Prerequisites: (i) LANG3003 is open to students who have successfully completed French II.1. Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG3003 without enroling in French III.1. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG3004. French/Chinese translation: practical skills (3 credits) The objective of this course is to reinforce students' language skills in French while making them aware of problems arising from transferring meaning from French to Chinese, and conversely. Most of the work will focus on common translation difficulties between the two languages and will propose ways of dealing with them. This course, very practical in nature, will make use of materials drawn from various sources, e.g., literature, press articles, movies, bilingual documents, business correspondence, etc. Prerequisites: (i) LANG3004 is open to students who have successfully completed French II.1. Alternatively, candidates will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG3004 without enroling in French III.1. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. 151 LANG3005. French and business (3 credits) This course is an introduction to the use of French in a business context. A variety of topics and situations will be studied, such as the structure of a firm and the way it operates both internally and with its partners, job application etc. The teaching materials used for this course will be drawn from actual sources and discussions will also focus on the local region, with the particular aim to provide the participants with first-hand facts and information on the business relationship between France and Hong Kong. Prerequisites: (i) LANG3005 is open to students who have successfully completed French II.1. Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG3005 without enroling in French III.1 Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG3022. French eastern narratives (3 credits) This course offers an overview of how French writers and travellers wrote about China, Indochina and Japan over the last three centuries, from the debut of French global travelling (early 18th century) to recent periods. Through the close study of depictions and narrations of encounters, the objective will be to recognize trends, contradictions and invariants in this process of channeling home the Far East, either as a romanticized cultural alternative or as a strong repellent. The extent to which these various accounts and representations have inspired the aesthetics and literary productions of contemporary France will also be examined in some instances. The medium of discussion will be mainly French, and the texts (novel excerpts, press, films, iconography) will be in French or, where appropriate, provided with translation. Prerequisites: (i) LANG3022 is open to students who have successfully completed French II.1. Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG3022 without enroling in French III.1. Assessment: 100% coursework. LANG3033. French media and advertising (3 credits) The discussion will start with an inventory of the media in France with a particular focus on newspapers and magazines, including web-based publications. It will examine how the press targets the public, using various areas of specialization (e.g. political affiliation, social and current affairs, women issues, family and domestic sphere, etc.). In a second phase, we shall look into how advertising techniques convey information as well as messages of various natures. While studying a large range of selected materials, we will aim at disclosing the rhetorical devices at work in the process of construction of images, mainly inspired by prevalent social mythologies and stereotyped representations. The discussion will make extensive use of materials under various forms, such as pictures, posters, advertisements, videos, TV excerpts, press samples, webpages etc. The main medium of instruction is French. Prerequisites: (i) LANG3033 is open to students who have successfully completed French II.1. Alternatively, candidates will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG3033 without enroling in French III.1. Assessment: 100% coursework. 152 LANG3034. French essay writing (3 credits) In this course, participants will receive tuition and guidance to complete an extended piece of writing in French based on a topic of their choice and in connection with France. Participants will be also encouraged to make use of any materials they may have collected in the course of their stay in the country. The objectives of this course are to increase students' confidence in their handling of written French, to stimulate creative writing and to enhance composition skills. Prerequisites: (i) LANG3034 is open to students who have successfully completed French II.1. Alternatively, candidates will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG3034 without enroling in French III.1. Assessment: 100% coursework. LANG3036. French society and cinema (3 credits) This course will make use of films to examine French contemporary society. Cinema will be discussed in connection with social changes brought about since the Second World War. The aim of this course is to use images to analyse how cinema through its language and technical evolution reflected the transformations of modern society. The discussion will start with `conventional films', e.g., narratives following the nineteenth century literary tradition focusing on plots and characters. The `Nouvelle Vague' and its celebrated directors Franois Truffaut and Eric Rohmer will help to give a better understanding of the revolution triggered by the post war period and marking the birth of a new film language. Students will use films to discuss social, cultural and gender issues. The role of women in French society will be examined through a series of recent films. The main medium of instruction is French. Prerequisites: (i) LANG3036 is open to students who have successfully completed French II.1. Alternatively, candidates will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG3036 without enroling in French III.1. Assessment: 100% coursework. LANG3038. French in France (3 credits) This course is taught and organized by several French universities and teaching institutions during the summer between the 2nd and 3rd Year of the French B.A. programme. The course lasts about three to four weeks and is designed to build on and to reinforce the language competence acquired during the first two years of study. This course should also prepare the participants for more advanced work in the final year. Prerequisite: Students must have completed LANG2001 (French Language II.1), or establish that they have attained a similar standard. Assessment: 100% coursework. In order to be granted credits for this course, participants will be requested to produce a statement with the mention of a grade from the host institution. LANG3053. French literature: the 19th century (3 credits) French writers such as Chateaubriand, Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Baudelaire and Mallarm were instrumental in shaping new directions in French and world literatures. The 19th century is a period of overwhelming transformation, with literature and arts at the heart of this wave of changes. In this course, we shall provide a concise introduction to the key figures and works that have marked the literary scene, as well as to the main schools of thought to which contemporary writers are still indebted. The course is particularly designed to enhance participants' reading and analytical skills in 153 the French language and to broaden their knowledge of French life and culture. The discussion will concentrate on texts and excerpts from works in a variety of genres (fiction, drama and poetry) chosen for their representativeness. Biographies of writers will be discussed too. The medium of instruction and discussion will be French, and the texts examined will be in French. Prerequisites: (i) LANG3053 is open to students who have successfully completed French II.1. Alternatively, students must provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite course. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG3053 without enroling in French III.1. Assessments: 100% coursework. LANG3054. French literature: the 20th century (3 credits) French literature was the scene of radical explorations and experiences in the 20th century, from the early surrealists to the oulipian generation. Writers were closely connected to social and political developments in France and outside France, as well as open to other forms of art, such as painting and cinema. This course will introduce the participants to the major writers and movements of this period. The course is particularly designed to enhance participants' reading and analytical skills in the French language and to broaden their knowledge of French life and culture. The discussion will concentrate on texts and excerpts from works in a variety of genres (fiction, drama and poetry) chosen for their representativeness. Biographies of writers will be discussed too. The medium of instruction and discussion will be French, and the texts examined will be in French. Prerequisites: (i) LANG3054 is open to students who have successfully completed French II.1. Alternatively, students must provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite course. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG3054 without enroling in French III.1. Assessments: 100% coursework. German Courses First Year LANG1003. German I.1 (6 credits) This beginners course in German language does not require any previous knowledge of German. Students will acquire basic linguistic and communicative skills in German in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Apart from their regular language classes students will be taught in small tutorial groups to ensure an environment highly conducive to practising language skills. Prerequisite: Nil. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG1004. German I.2 (12 6 credits) This course is a continuation of German I.1. It combines linguistic and communicative skills in German with a balanced emphasis on speaking, listening, reading and writing. Small tutorial groups, which will be arranged in addition to the regular language classes, will provide the students with an environment highly conducive to practising their language skills. The course will also encourage students to exploit resources available on the Internet and in the Centre's self-practice facilities (Language Resource Centres and Practice Lab) which provide a wide range of materials for language practice, including audio and videotapes, CD-ROMs and computer programmes. Students intending to proceed to the second year will be provided with a range of self-access materials to maintain and 154 enhance their skills during the summer break. Prerequisite: German I.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to German I.2 without having enrolled in German I.1 previously will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere a standard adequate to enable them to complete the course satisfactorily. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG1040. Contrastive language studies: German Chinese (3 credits) This course looks at the major structural and lexical similarities and differences between the first (Chinese) and target (German) language. Students will be provided with a systematic comparison and exploration of the languages which cover various linguistic aspects such as phonology, morphology, syntax etc. Special attention will be given to some typical difficulties and frequent mistakes of learning German for Chinese learners with the aim of avoiding those problems in their further studies. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. Second Year LANG2004. German II.1 (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and builds on the first year work. It offers a balanced range of the various language skills through further syntax acquisition; reading and text analysis, listening comprehension, composition, oral expression and communicative skills. A wide variety of teaching techniques is used. Small tutorial groups are arranged throughout the year to ensure maximum opportunities for interactive practice. All students continuing their studies in the third year are strongly encouraged to attend a summer intensive immersion course in Germany. Prerequisites: German I.2 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to German II.1 without having enrolled for German I.2 previously will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere a standard adequate to enable them to complete the course satisfactorily. Examination: The Examination for this course consists of one three-hour paper and a coursework assessment element. In addition, the examination also includes an oral examination. Assessment: Coursework assessment shall count 40% of the grade awarded for German II.1. LANG2039. Translation exercise I (3 credits) Students will practise written translations from German to Chinese and Chinese to German using a variety of texts written in different styles. The main aim is to make students aware of the major structural differences between German and Chinese and to provide them with additional information on contemporary German topics. Co-requisites: German II.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to Translation exercise I without having enrolled in German II.1 will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained the requisite standard elsewhere. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course is taught in the first semester only. 155 LANG2040. Translation exercise II (3 credits) This course is taught in the second semester only. It is a continuation of Translation exercise I and students will practise additional structures and texts. Prerequisite: LANG2039 Translation exercise I Co-requisites: German II.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to Translation exercise II without having enrolled in German II.1 will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained the requisite standard elsewhere. Assessment: 100% coursework. LANG2041. Representations of contemporary German society in the media (3 credits) This course will look at representations of various aspects of contemporary German society in the media over the past 50 years. Topics will include: The changing role of women in advertisements since the 50s, American influences on youth culture and everyday life, society in film, society in music, and contemporary German comedians. For each topic students will study authentic materials in German such as advertisements, TV commercials, newspaper texts, songs, film clips and movies. Co-requisites: German II.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to LANG2041 without having enrolled in German II.1 will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained the requisite standard elsewhere. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG2042. Producing German texts I (3 credits) This course will provide students with the skills needed to produce texts of different styles such as postcards, personal letters, formal letters, short essays, etc. It will strengthen their vocabulary base and at the same time improve and enhance their ability to write in German. Co-requisites: German II.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to LANG2042 without having enrolled in German II.1 will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained the requisite standard elsewhere. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG2056. Understanding Germany and the Germans (3 credits) This course provides an introduction to geographical, political, social and cultural aspects of contemporary Germany. The topics will include: Germany's political system, contemporary life in the unified Germany, family and social life, German customs and traditions and multicultural aspects of Germany society. Emphasis will be given to topics that relate to major current events / developments in Germany. The aim is to assist students in developing a better understanding of contemporary life in Germany and its society as well as to broaden their vocabulary and enhance their German language skills. Guest speakers will be invited to give talks on selected topics. Students will be given the opportunity to discuss and raise in-depth questions during the talks. Classes will be conducted in German and English. Co-requisites: German II.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students may not enroll in Understanding Germany and the Germans without enrolling in German II.1 156 unless they have previously attained a standard adequate to enable them to complete the course satisfactorily. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG2061. German for business I (3 credits) The objective of this course is to provide students with the German vocabulary necessary to communicate efficiently in a wide range of business situations and to develop their communication and writing skills in this field. A variety of issues and situations will be addressed such as dealing with and entertaining customers, making contact and travelling, conducting negotiations, describing and introducing a company. In addition, students will be introduced to German commercial correspondence and German trading terminology. Authentic materials and video clippings will be used and field trips to German companies organised to provide students with insights into the actual business conduct in German companies not only in Germany but also in Hong Kong as well as with information about German-Hong Kong business relations. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. Second/Third Years LANG0002. Introducing Germany and the Germans (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course provides an introduction to contemporary life in Germany. Topics to be covered include: The German Language, Outline of German History, Geographical Diversity, Housing and Urban Development, Federalism, Germany's Political System, Festivals, Family, Youth, Education, Arts and Music, Leisure Time and Sports, Protection of the Environment, Women and Society, and Cultural Representations in Advertising. All lectures will be conducted in English. Prerequisites: Nil. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. Third Year LANG3007. German III.1 (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and is a continuation of German II.1. It offers a balanced range of language skills, and furthers the exploration of various linguistic aspects of the language. Special attention will be given to language registers and patterns, specific terminology and structures used in a variety of fields (literature, press reports, business documents etc.) with the aim of stimulating critical reading. As in German II.1 small tutorial groups will be arranged to ensure oral fluency and writing techniques as well as the development of oral skills in the context of argumented discourses and presentations. Prerequisites: German II.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to German III.1 without having enrolled in German II.1 previously will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere a standard adequate to enable them to complete the course satisfactorily. Examination: The Examination for this course consists of one three-hour paper and a coursework assessment element. In addition, the examination also includes an oral examination. 157 Assessment: Coursework assessment shall count 40% of the grade awarded for German III.1. LANG3008. Reading course (3 credits) This course will only be offered during the first semester. It enhances and extends the language skills acquired during the first and second year through systematic study in the form of text analysis, discussion, translation, etc. of contemporary texts and documents written in different styles such as newspaper and magazine articles, songs etc. drawn from current affairs and life in Germany. Prerequisites: German II.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to Reading course without having enrolled in German II.1 previously will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere a standard adequate to enable them to complete the course satisfactorily. Students may not enrol in Reading course without enrolling in German III.1 unless they have previously attained a standard adequate to enable them to complete the course satisfactorily. Assessment: Coursework assessment shall count 100% of the grade awarded for Reading course This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG3010. German project (3 credits) In this course students will study in depth an approved topic of their choice in German. They will present their findings in class and submit a written project of around 2,000 words in German at the end of the course. Students wishing to enrol in this course are encouraged to make use of their stay in Germany to collect materials for their project. Prerequisites: German II.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to German project without having enrolled in German II.1 previously will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere a standard adequate to enable them to complete the course satisfactorily. Students may not enrol in German project without enrolling in German III.1 unless they have previously attained a standard adequate to enable them to complete the course satisfactorily. Assessment: Coursework assessment shall count 100% of the grade awarded for German project. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG3039. German in Germany (3 credits) This course is taught and organized by several German universities and teaching institutions during the summer between the 2nd and 3rd Year of the German B.A. programme. The course lasts about three to four weeks and is designed to build on and to reinforce the language competence acquired during the first two years of study. This course should also prepare the participants for more advanced work in the final year. Prerequisite: Students must have completed LANG2004 (Deutsch II.1), or establish that they have attained a similar standard. Assessment: 100% coursework. In order to be granted credits for this course, participants will be requested to produce a statement with the mention of a grade from the host institution. LANG3045. Translation exercise III (3 credits) Students practise translations mainly from English to German using a variety of texts written in different styles. The texts discussed refer to contemporary life in Germany and other German- 158 speaking countries and usually include the following topics: culture, politics and social life. The aim is to make students aware of the major structural and lexical differences between German and English as well as to provide them with some information on contemporary German topics and life-style. Co-requisites: German III.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to Translation exercise III without having enrolled in German III.1 will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained the requisite standard elsewhere. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester only. LANG3046. Translation exercise IV (3 credits) This course is a continuation of LANG3045 Translation exercise III enhancing and extending the acquired translation skills. Major topics to be discussed are: German customs and traditions, life experiences of foreigners studying or working in Germany, and integration of immigrants in Germany. Prerequisite: LANG3045 Translation exercise III Co-requisites: German III.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to Translation exercise IV without having enrolled in German III.1 will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained the requisite standard elsewhere. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester only. LANG3047. Producing German texts II (3 credits) This course will enable students to produce longer texts such as critical essays, short stories, etc. It will provide students with strategies to structure texts of various styles and topics. Sessions will be divided into two parts: Part I will be a discussion and analysis of texts prepared by the students following the introduction of the topic in the previous session. Part II will introduce the topic of the following session. It will teach students how to approach the topic and how to structure their texts. This will be illustrated by a critical reading of sample texts. Co-requisites: German III.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to LANG3047 without having enrolled in German III.1 will have to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained the requisite standard elsewhere. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester only. LANG3048. Fairytale princes, nature lovers and revolutionaries The German Romantics (3 credits) This course explores one of the most popular periods in German literature - German Romanticism. While this period is well known for its emotional and imaginative descriptions of nature and expressions of feelings, many of its writers also had been deeply affected by the historical, political and social events of their times. The course begins with providing a short overview over the literary and historical developments leading up to and following this period, followed by an in-depth study of authentic texts from various authors representing the two main streams of German Romanticism and it concludes by tracing Romantic influences in modern society. Co-requisites: German III.1 or comparable level acquired elsewhere. Students wishing to be admitted to LANG3048 without having enrolled in German III.1 will have to satisfy 159 the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained the requisite standard elsewhere. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester only. LANG3056. German for business II (3 credits) This course is a continuation of LANG2061. The objective of this course is to build on and enhance the competence and skills acquired in LANG2061. Like in LANG2061, authentic materials and video clippings will be used and field trips to German companies organised to provide students with insights into the actual business conduct in German companies not only in Germany but also in Hong Kong as well as with information about German-Hong Kong business relations. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester only. Italian Courses First Year LANG1007. Italian I.1 (6 credits) This course is intended for complete beginners in Italian and does not require any previous knowledge of the language. Participants will acquire a basic knowledge in the four areas of competence (listening, speaking, reading and writing) with a particular emphasis on communicative skills. Prerequisite: Nil Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG1008. Italian I.2 (6 credits) This course is a continuation of Italian I.1. It will further develop the four areas of competence with the view of expanding students' linguistic, pronunciation and communicative skills. Participants will be asked to make use of a range of materials available in the Centre's self-access facilities (which include audio, video, CD Rom and computer programmes), as well as to take advantage of resources accessible through Internet Prerequisite: Students must have satisfactorily completed Italian I.1 or provide evidence that they have attained a comparable level elsewhere. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. Second Year LANG2010. Italian II (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and is a continuation of Italian I.2. The intention is to build further on the junior level work and widen the scope of exposure to more complex aspects of the language. The teaching will diversify through the use of more elaborate material and a variety of teaching techniques including work with video. Participants are expected to consolidate their understanding of Italian language and develop further their production and reception skills. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Italian II without having previously completed 160 Italian I.2 will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: One examination and a coursework element which shall count 60% and 40% respectively of the final grade awarded. Examination: The examination for Italian II consists of one written paper of 2-hour duration and a separate oral examination. LANG2031. Italian reading course (3 credits) This course is offered to the students at intermediate and advanced levels in order to improve their skills in textual analysis, discussion and translation of contemporary texts and documents such as magazines, newspaper, songs and articles related to current Italian life. Prerequisite: Students must have satisfactorily completed Italian I.2 or provide evidence that they have attained a comparable level elsewhere. Students may not enrol in the Italian reading course without enroling in Italian II. It is also open to students currently studying LANG3012 Italian III or an equivalent certificate course. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG2032. Italian and business (3 credits) This course is offered to students at intermediate and advanced levels. It will focus on a variety of topics, such as commercial correspondence, marketing strategies, advertising campaigns, job applications, banking terminology, etc. Prerequisite: Students must have satisfactorily completed Italian I.2 or provide evidence that they have attained a comparable level elsewhere. Students may not enrol in the Italian and business course without enroling in Italian II. It is also open to students currently studying LANG3012 Italian III or an equivalent certificate course. Assessment: 100% coursework. LANG2050. A profile of Italian literature I (3 credits) This course presents a broad introduction to Italian Literature from the 13th to the 20th century. It will examine works of the prominent Italian writers through the study of excerpts and is particularly designed to enhance students' reading and analytical skills in the Italian language. The medium of instruction and discussion will be Italian. Prerequisites: (i) the course is open to students who have successfully completed Italian I.2; (ii) students may not enrol without enroling in Italian II.1. It is also open to students currently studying LANG3012 Italian III or an equivalent certificate course. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG2051. A profile of Italian literature II (Contemporary Italian literature) (3 credits) This course offers an introduction to the major movements and authors of Italian Literature over the last fifty years. The selection of texts will also serve as a basis for discussion on some social issues 161 regarding contemporary Italy. The medium of instruction and discussion will be Italian. Prerequisites: (i) the course is open to students who have successfully completed Italian I.2; (ii) students may not enrol without enroling in Italian II.1. It is also open to students currently studying LANG3012 Italian III or an equivalent certificate course. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. Second/Third Years LANG0001. Introduction to Italian life and culture (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course will give an outline of Italian civilization and contemporary culture in its manifold aspects, ranging from arts, history, music, Italian customs and traditions in the different regions and cities, to cinema and tourism, food, fashion, environment, education, sport and politics with particular focus on the youth world. The teacher will present a variety of subjects making use of videos and authentic materials (music, magazines, advertising, etc.), from which the students will choose topics and discuss them in discussion groups. Each group will then present, at the end of the course, a project on a particular subject. In case the students should be interested, some basic knowledge of the Italian language will be offered. Prerequisite: Nil. Assessment: 100% coursework. Medium of instruction: English. Knowledge of Italian is not necessary. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG0006. Italian classical roots of European civilization (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Touching on different subjects such as Latin Language and Philosophy, Architecture and Law, Literature and History, Religion and Politics, the course will examine how Europe was shaped by its Roman heritage and how classical roots contributed to create a multifaced but unique civilization. All lectures will be conducted in English. Prerequisite: Nil Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. Third Year LANG3012. Italian III (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and continues to build on the two previous years' work on a more advanced level. The intention is to lead participants towards a fairly comprehensive understanding of the Italian language features through the study of a variety of documents (written, audio and video). The selection of documents will also serve as a basis for discussion on some social issues regarding contemporary Italy, as well as her history and cultural background. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Italian III without having previously completed Italian II will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: One examination and a coursework element which shall count 60% and 40% 162 respectively of the final grade awarded. Examination: The examination for Italian III consists of one written paper of 3-hour duration and a separate oral examination. LANG3040. Italian in Italy (3 credits) This course is taught and organized by several Italian universities and teaching institutions during the summer between the 2nd and 3rd Year of the Italian B.A. programme. The course lasts about three to four weeks and is designed to build on and to reinforce the language competence acquired during the first two years of study. This course should also prepare the participants for more advanced work in the final year. Prerequisite: Students must have completed LANG2010 (Italian II), or establish that they have attained a similar standard. Assessment: 100% coursework. In order to be granted credits for this course, participants will be requested to produce a statement with the mention of a grade from the host institution. Portuguese Courses First Year LANG1025. Portuguese for beginners - Part I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The aim of this course is to enable students to reach a basic communicative competence in Portuguese, while developing their listening, speaking, writing and reading skills. Development of self-learning strategies will also be introduced in the later part of the course. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG1026. Portuguese for beginners - Part II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a continuation of Portuguese for beginners I. Pre-requisite for Portuguese for beginners II: Portuguese for beginners I. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. Second Year LANG2024. Portuguese II (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and is a continuation of Portuguese for beginners Part II. The intention is to build further on the junior level work and widen the scope of exposure to more complex aspects of the language. The teaching will diversify through the use of more elaborate material and a variety of teaching techniques including work with video. Participants are expected to consolidate their understanding of Portuguese language and develop further their production and reception skills. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Portuguese II without having previously completed Portuguese for beginners Part II will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they 163 have attained elsewhere the required standard. One examination and a coursework element which shall count 60% and 40% respectively of the final grade awarded. Examination: The examination for Portuguese II consists of one written paper of 2-hour duration and a separate oral examination. Assessment: Third Year LANG3026. Portuguese III (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and continues to build on the two previous years' work on a more advanced level. The intention is to lead participants towards a fairly comprehensive understanding of the Portuguese language through the study of a variety of documents (written, audio and video). The selection of documents will also serve as a basis for discussion on some social issues regarding contemporary Portugal, as well as her history and cultural background. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Portuguese III without having previously completed Portuguese II will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: One examination and a coursework element which shall count 60% and 40% respectively of the final grade awarded. Examination: The examination for Portuguese III consists of one written paper of 3-hour duration and a separate oral examination. LANG3041. Portuguese in Portugal (3 credits) This course is taught and organized by several Portuguese universities and teaching institutions during the summer between the 2nd and 3rd Year of the Portuguese B.A. programme. The course lasts about three to four weeks and is designed to build on and to reinforce the language competence acquired during the first two years of study. This course should also prepare the participants for more advanced work in the final year. Prerequisite: Students must have completed LANG2024 (Portuguese II), or establish that they have attained a similar standard. Assessment: 100% coursework. In order to be granted credits for this course, participants will be requested to produce a statement with the mention of a grade from the host institution. Spanish Courses First Year LANG1038. Spanish language I.1 (6 credits) The main objective of the course is to teach students the basics of Spanish and to provide the participants with a firm foundation in the spoken and written language as well as to offer insights into Spanish culture. Through a communicative approach this course should quickly enable participants to engage in simple conversations and understand a variety of interactive situations at both linguistic and cultural levels. Emphasis will also be put on the acquisition of a sound grammar base for more advanced work. Prerequisite: Nil Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. 164 LANG1039. Spanish language I.2 (12 6 credits) This course is a continuation of Spanish language I.1. The objective of the course is to build on the work completed in the first semester so as to consolidate and broaden participants' foundation in spoken and written Spanish. Emphasis will be put on expanding the four skills as well as on the development of autonomous learnings. Prerequisite: Students must have satisfactorily completed Spanish language I.1 or provide evidence that they have attained a comparable level elsewhere. Assessment: 100% coursework. Coursework includes: i) progress tests, ii) participation in class, iii) a brief oral test and iv) other assignments. This course will be offered in the second semester. Second Year LANG2011. Spanish II (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and is a continuation of Spanish I.2. The course builds further on the first year's work and widens the scope of exposure to more complex aspects of the language. The teaching will diversify through the use of more elaborate material and a variety of teaching techniques including work with video. Participants are expected to consolidate their understanding of Spanish and develop further their production and reception skills. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Spanish II must have completed Spanish I.2 Students wishing to be admitted to Spanish II without having previously completed Spanish I.2 will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: The examination and coursework elements count 60% and 40% respectively. Examination: The examination for Spanish II consists of one written paper of 3-hour duration and a separate oral examination. LANG2055. Spanish for business I (3 credits) This course is aimed to provide students with a relevant knowledge of the specific vocabulary and language skills necessary to successfully communicate in Spanish in the most common situations of international business. This course will also allow students to become familiar with the main characteristics of the economy in Spanish-speaking countries, focusing on the commercial relations between Asia and these countries. Prerequisite: (i) This course is open to students who have successfully completed Spanish I.2 and are currently enrolled in Spanish II. (ii) Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a comparable standard in Spanish. (iii) Knowledge in the field of business and economics is not necessary. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG2057. Spanish language and culture I (3 credits) The objective of this course is to give an introduction to contemporary Spain. Through a variety of texts, students will learn about Spanish society (politics, economy, education, etc.) and culture 165 (customs, festivals, family, etc.) as well as more intrinsic aspects of the Spanish language. The course will explore subjects such as the transition from a dictatorship to a democratic government, the changes in society and the challenges in the XXI century. This course can help students intending to go to Spain in the summer to learn more about the country. Teaching materials and medium of instruction will be Spanish. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2057 is open to students who have successfully completed LANG1038 (Spanish Language I.1) and LANG1039 (Spanish Language I.2). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2057 without also enrolling in LANG2011 Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG2058. Spanish language and culture II (3 credits) This course is a continuation of LANG2057 (Spanish Language and Culture I). The course will continue exploring different aspects of Spanish language and culture through authentic sources. This course can help students intending to go to Spain in the summer to learn more about the country. Teaching materials and medium of instruction will be Spanish. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2058 is open to students who have successfully completed LANG1038 (Spanish Language I.1) and LANG1039 (Spanish Language I.2) as well as LANG2057 (Spanish Language and Culture I). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2058 without enrolling in LANG2011 Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. LANG2059. Spanish phonetics I (3 credits) This course will describe and classify the sounds of Spanish, study the Spanish sound system and deal with phonological problems related to the Spanish language. It will focus on eradicating the most typical pronunciation difficulties encountered by students, with special attention to the specific problems of Asian students. The course will also help students to improve their accent in Spanish. Although there will be a theoretical part, this is mainly a practical course, and no previous knowledge of Linguistics is required. Class activities will be organized in small groups, allowing the teacher to work closely with each student. Teaching materials and medium of instruction will be Spanish. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2059 is open to students who have successfully completed LANG1038 (Spanish Language I.1) and LANG1039 (Spanish Language I.2). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2059 (Spanish Phonetics I) without enrolling in LANG2011 Assessment: 100% Coursework which will include the following: a) One progress test at the end of the course (40% of the final mark) b) Assignments (60% of the final mark). Assignments may includes: Quizzes Evaluation of recorded material Phonetic transcription activities This course will be offered in the first semester. 166 LANG2060. Spanish phonetics II (3 credits) This second part of the course will still focus on improving students' pronunciation of Spanish, covering more advanced features such as intonation patterns, phonetic transcription and sounds which are particularly difficult for Asian Students. It will also aim at providing students with language samples of different accents and norms of Spanish around the world. Students will be exposed to different Spanish accents from Spain and Latin America. They will receive training on how to identify and understand the different pronunciation of words. Prerequisites: (i) LANG2060 (Spanish Phonetics II) is open to students who have successfully completed LANG1038 (Spanish Language I.1) and LANG1039 (Spanish Language I.2) as well as LANG2059 (Spanish Phonetics I). Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence they have attained elsewhere a standard at least comparable to a pass in the prerequisite courses. (ii) Students may not enrol in LANG2060 (Spanish Phonetics II) without enrolling in LANG2011 Assessment: 100% Coursework which will include the following: a) One progress test at the end of the course (40% of the final mark) b) Assignments (60% of the final mark). Assignments may includes: Quizzes Evaluation of recorded material Phonetic transcription activities This course will be offered in the second semester. Second/Third Years LANG0003. Introduction to Spanish culture (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to give students an insight into Spanish culture and traditions with an emphasis on Spain. Guest speakers will give talks about different aspects of culture and discussion about the topics seen in the course will be encouraged. Prerequisites: Nil. Assessment: 100% Coursework. Medium of instruction: English. Knowledge of Spanish is not necessary. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG0005. Hispanic film and literature (3 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The goal of this course is to introduce Spanish and Spanish American cinema and literature as well as to improve students' analytical and critical thinking skills. At the same time, this course may be very useful to students who wish to improve their language skills by themselves and learn more about the culture of Spanish speaking countries from direct sources, such as writers and film makers. The course objectives will be tackled in three ways: a) with a focus on film and literature as a representation of Hispanic culture; b) by analyzing a selection of representative cinematographic and literary texts; and c) by considering how literature written in Spanish has inspired films. Prerequisite: Nil. Students of all faculties are welcome. Medium of Instruction: English. Knowledge of Spanish is not necessary. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. 167 Third Year LANG3013. Spanish III (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and continues to build on the two previous years' work on a more advanced level. The intention is to lead participants towards a fairly comprehensive understanding of the Spanish language through the study of a variety of documents (written, audio and video). The selection of documents will also serve as a basis for discussion on some social issues regarding contemporary Spain, as well as her history and culture. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Spanish III must have completed Spanish II. Students wishing to be admitted to Spanish III without having previously completed Spanish II will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: The examination and coursework elements count 60% and 40% respectively. Examination: The examination of Spanish III consists of one written paper of 3-hour duration and a separate oral examination. LANG3042. Spanish in Spain (3 credits) This course is taught and organized by several Spanish universities and teaching institutions during the summer between the 2nd and 3rd Year of the Spanish B.A. programme. The course lasts about three to four weeks and is designed to build on and to reinforce the language competence acquired during the first two years of study. This course should also prepare the participants for more advanced work in the final year. Prerequisite: Students must have completed LANG2011 (Spanish II), or establish that they have attained a similar standard elsewhere. Assessment: 100% coursework. In order to be granted credits for this course, participants will be requested to produce a statement with the mention of a grade from the host institution. LANG3055. Spanish for business II (3 credits) This course is a continuation of Spanish for Business I and it is aimed at facilitating students' acquisition of the necessary skills to work in companies that require the knowledge of Spanish to deliver their business. The focus is skill development, such as letter writing, phone conversations and product presentation. Guest speakers will be invited to present topics relevant to the course contents, in order to allow students to have a close contact with the Hispanic business community in Hong Kong. Prerequisite: (i) This course is open to students who have successfully completed Spanish II and are currently enrolled in Spanish III. (ii) Alternatively, students will be required to provide evidence that they have attained elsewhere a comparable standard in Spanish. (iii) Students may not enroll in Spanish for business II without having completed Spanish for business I. Assessment: 100% Coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. Swedish Courses First Year 168 LANG1023. Swedish for beginners - Part I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is for beginners of Swedish and will introduce the students to the essentials of the Swedish language through a communicative approach. The course will cover speaking, listening, reading and writing but with emphasis on speaking. Students will learn how to interact in everyday situations such as shopping, taking the bus, asking for directions, making a phone call etc. Apart from using textbooks, additional classroom materials, such as videos, and other audio-visuals will be used. The course will also give students an insight to Swedish culture and society. Since Sweden, Norway and Denmark are closely related in culture and language, the course will also give a wider understanding of Scandinavia. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. LANG1024. Swedish for beginners - Part II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a continuation of Swedish for beginners I. Pre-requisite for Swedish for beginners II: Swedish for beginners I. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. Second Year LANG2023. Swedish II (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and is a continuation of Swedish for beginners Part II. The intention is to build further on the junior level work and widen the scope of exposure to more complex aspects of the language. The teaching will diversify through the use of more elaborate material and a variety of teaching techniques. Participants are expected to consolidate their understanding of Swedish language and develop further their production and reception skills. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Swedish II without having previously completed Swedish for beginners Part II will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: One examination and a coursework element which shall count 60% and 40% respectively of the final grade awarded. Examination: The examination for Swedish II consists of one written paper of 2-hour duration and a separate oral examination. Second/Third Year LANG0007. From Vikings to Volvo: an introduction to the development of contemporary Sweden (3 credits) This course will give an insight into historical and cultural developments leading up to present day Sweden and also a closer look at different aspects of contemporary Sweden and the role of the Swedish Model in the 21st century. A variety of materials will be used and the students are expected to present a project at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: Nil 169 Medium of Instruction: English Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. Third Year LANG3025. Swedish III (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and continues to build on the two previous years' work on a more advanced level. The intention is to lead participants towards a fairly comprehensive understanding of the Swedish language features through the study of a variety of documents (written, audio and video). The selection of documents will also serve as a basis for discussion on some social issues regarding contemporary Sweden, as well as her history and cultural background. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Swedish III without having previously completed Swedish II will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: One examination and a coursework element which shall count 60% and 40% respectively of the final grade awarded. Examination: The examination for Swedish III consists of one written paper of 3-hour duration and a separate oral examination. LANG3043. Swedish in Sweden (3 credits) This course is taught and organized by several Swedish universities and teaching institutions during the summer between the 2nd and 3rd Year of the Swedish B.A. programme. The course lasts about three to four weeks and is designed to build on and to reinforce the language competence acquired during the first two years of study. This course should also prepare the participants for more advanced work in the final year. Prerequisite: Students must have completed LANG2023 (Swedish II), or establish that they have attained a similar standard. Assessment: 100% coursework. In order to be granted credits for this course, participants will be requested to produce a statement with the mention of a grade from the host institution. Thai Courses First Year LANG1021. Thai for beginners - Part I (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to teach complete beginners the basics of Thai with respect to the four linguistic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will also be introduced to Thai culture and society. Vocabulary and grammar will be presented in a communicative way for a variety of situations, e.g. making introductions, leave-taking, giving directions, buying things, making telephone calls and so on. The emphasis will be on the spoken language, as well as on providing a secure foundation for basic Thai. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the first semester. 170 LANG1022. Thai for beginners - Part II (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a continuation of Thai for beginners I. Pre-requisite for Thai for beginners II: Thai for beginners I. Assessment: 100% coursework. This course will be offered in the second semester. Second Year LANG2022. Thai II (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and is a continuation of Thai for beginners Part II. The intention is to build further on the junior level work and widen the scope of exposure to more complex aspects of the language. The teaching will diversify through the use of more elaborate material and a variety of teaching techniques including work with video. Participants are expected to consolidate their understanding of Thai language and develop further their production and reception skills. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Thai II without having previously completed Thai for beginners Part II will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: One examination and a coursework element which shall count 60% and 40% respectively of the final grade awarded. Examination: The examination for Thai II consists of one written paper of 2-hour duration and a separate oral examination. Third Year LANG3024. Thai III (12 credits) This course is taught throughout the year and continues to build on the two previous years' work on a more advanced level. The intention is to lead participants towards a fairly comprehensive understanding of the Thai language features through the study of a variety of documents (written, audio and video). The selection of documents will also serve as a basis for discussion on some social issues regarding contemporary Thailand, as well as her history and cultural background. Prerequisites: Students wishing to be admitted to Thai III without having previously completed Thai II will be required to satisfy the Faculty Board through the Head of the School of Modern Languages and Cultures that they have attained elsewhere the required standard. Assessment: One examination and a coursework element which shall count 60% and 40% respectively of the final grade awarded. Examination: The examination for Thai III consists of one written paper of 3-hour duration and a separate oral examination. LANG3044. Thai in Thailand (3 credits) This course is taught and organized by several Thai universities and teaching institutions during the summer between the 2nd and 3rd Year of the Thai B.A. programme. The course lasts about three to four weeks and is designed to build on and to reinforce the language competence acquired during the first two years of study. This course should also prepare the participants for more advanced work in the final year. Prerequisite: Students must have completed LANG2022 (Thai II), or establish that they have attained a 171 Assessment: similar standard. 100% coursework. In order to be granted credits for this course, participants will be requested to produce a statement with the mention of a grade from the host institution. 172 DESCRIPTION FOR UNDERGRADUATE COURSES OFFERED BY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 2007-08 The courses listed below will not be necessarily offered every year. Junior Level Courses BUSI1002. Introduction to accounting (6 credits) The course will cover the principles of double entry book-keeping, the interpretation of financial statements, the issues raised by corporate regulation, and the use of management information for decision making. BUSI1003. Introduction to management information systems (6 credits) The objectives of this course are to (i) examine the new opportunities and challenges brought about by technological developments, and (ii) outline effective ways information technology can be utilised in different functional areas of the business to sustain the firm's strategic position in today's interrelated global market. BUSI1004. Marketing (6 credits) An introductory course on the basic concepts of marketing and their implications in management. The ingredients of the Marketing Plan will be analysed and the problems involved in formulating marketing strategy; interpreting marketing data and coping with the changing market environment will be examined. BUSI1006. Principles and practices of modern business (3 credits) This course is deliberately designed to make students aware of the mechanics and environments in which modern day business operate in global, regional and domestic markets. This course aims to help students to understand modern business operations and development in the knowledge economy. This orientation is organized around the new emerging paradigms of business configuration and the skills required of future business leaders. Mutually exclusive courses: BUSI0015, and YSOB0001 BUSI1007. Principles of management (6 credits) This introductory course traces back to how the study and practice of management evolved over this past century, with particular focus on the landmark discoveries and lessons learned. The course aims to develop students' awareness of the nature of management processes and involves a study of the following topics: planning, organizing, controlling, leading, communication and change management. The programme's pedagogical design combines the ingredients of theoretical conceptualization and emphasizes interactive discussions, skill-building experiential exercises and students' presentations. Remarks: Students having completed BUSI1007 Principles of management (3 credits) offered in the academic year 2002-2003 or earlier are not allowed to take this course. 173 Senior Level Courses BUSI0001. Accounting systems and financial reporting in China (6 credits) The course will be an introduction to current accounting systems and financial reporting practices in China. The topics covered in this course include administration of accounting work, accounting legislation and regulations, business accounting standards, practices of cost accounting and managerial accounting, accounting for governments and non-profit organizations (budgetary accounting), financial reporting of the listed corporations, disclosure of other information, preparation of financial statements, auditing requirements, practices of public accounting, and analysis of financial statements in China. Prerequisite: BUSI1002 Introduction to accounting BUSI0002. Accounting theory (6 credits) The development and structure of accounting theory. Income determination. Asset valuation. Special areas of controversy, including social accounting and accounting for inflation. Principles of human information processing. Prerequisite: BUSI0020 Intermediate accounting II BUSI0003. Advanced financial accounting (6 credits) Application of accounting theory to the preparation of accounting standards and their implications for reporting purposes, particularly those related to the consolidation of group accounts, asset valuation and the influence on income determination. Other topics may include current cost accounting, income tax allocation, government entities and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: BUSI0020 Intermediate accounting II BUSI0004. Advertising management (6 credits) The preparation, use and administration of advertising, emphasizing the use of research to direct and measure the effectiveness of each stage in the operation. Prerequisite: BUSI1004 Marketing BUSI0006. Auditing (6 credits) Professional ethics, and the social and legal responsibilities of auditors; basic auditing concepts and principles; evidence; evaluation of internal control; standard procedures and methods of investigation. Prerequisite: BUSI0020 Intermediate accounting II BUSI0008. Business cycles and strategy (6 credits) A course on business cycles in a global economy and how firms devise business strategies. Topics include business expansion and contraction, hiring and layoff decisions, consumer spending, banking relationship and hedging strategies in a world of fluctuating exchange rates. Remarks: It is not available to Year I students. 174 BUSI0009. Business policy (6 credits) The course will review the analysis and implementation of strategic corporate decisions which encompass all functional areas of business. Students will be split into small groups and will be required to write a mini-project of not more than 5,000 words outlining the desired corporate strategy for a given corporate problem. Prerequisite: BUSI1002 Introduction to accounting, and BUSI0016/FINA1002 Introduction to finance or FINA1003 Corporate finance, and BUSI0027 Management accounting I, and BUSI1004 Marketing, and BUSI1007 Principles of management or BUSI1005 Organizational behaviour, and ECON1001 Introduction to economics I, and BUSI0036 Quantitative analysis for business decisions I or STAT0302 Business statistics or STAT1306 Introductory statistics Remarks: Only available to students in the School of Business. BUSI0010. Company law (6 credits) Formation of companies; memoranda and articles of association. Powers and duties of directors, secretaries and auditors. Shareholders' rights and powers and the role of the courts. Takeovers, mergers and investments; statutes, regulations and codes. Insolvency law and practice. Remarks: It is advisable to take BUSI1001 Business law prior to this course. BUSI0012. Comparative and international management (6 credits) This course introduces students to cross-cultural differences in social values and in psychological attitudes and considers their implications for behaviour in organizations. Initial consideration will be given to the process of development and the changes which that brings. This will be followed by a review of the major business cultures in Asia, contrasting them with Western examples. Concentration will be focused on Chinese forms of business. BUSI0013. Current business affairs (3 credits) The course focuses on current business affairs with emphasis is on the interaction between business behaviour and the economic environment. Topics include government policy, legal framework, imports and exports, banking and finance, property and land markets, retail and wholesale trade, public utilities, infrastructure investment projects, small and medium enterprises, and technology and innovation. Prerequisite: ECON1001 Introduction to economics I BUSI0015. Entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation (6 credits) This course explores the central issues involved in entrepreneurship, with particular on creativity and innovativeness. The course introduces some novel approach to learning and reflection in order to take advantage of a rapidly expanding intellectual core which gives meaning and coherence to entrepreneurial activities. Mutually exclusive courses: BUSI1006, and YSOB0001 175 BUSI0018. Hong Kong taxation (6 credits) A study of the accounting for, and management of, taxes on income under the Inland Revenue Ordinance, within the context of taxation theory. Prerequisite: BUSI1002 Introduction to accounting BUSI0019. Intermediate accounting I (6 credits) The course provides an in-depth knowledge of the first part of financial accounting. It covers the environment of financial accounting and the development of accounting standards; conceptual framework underlying financial accounting; statement of income and retained earnings; balance sheet; accounting and the time value of money; cash and receivables; valuation of inventories; acquisition and disposition of property, plant and equipment; depreciation and depletion; intangible assets; current liabilities and contingencies; long-term liabilities; temporary investments and long-term investments; and revenue recognition. Prerequisite: BUSI1002 Introduction to accounting BUSI0020. Intermediate accounting II (6 credits) This course provides an in-depth knowledge of the second part of financial accounting. It covers stockholders' equity; dilutive securities and earnings per share calculations; accounting for income taxes; accounting for pensions and postretirement benefits; accounting for leases; accounting changes and error analysis; statements of cash flows; basic financial statement analysis; and full disclosure in financial reporting. Prerequisite: BUSI0019 Intermediate accounting I BUSI0021. International accounting (6 credits) Cross-cultural paradigms in accounting. Accounting in the People's Republic of China. The German, Japanese and French accounting approaches. The history of the Anglo-American paradigm. Harmonisation of accounting standards and practices. Transfer pricing and international tax management. International accounting bodies and firms. Cash flow statements, secret reserves and other key variations in disclosure and measurement practices in developed countries. Prerequisite: BUSI1002. Introduction to accounting BUSI0022. International marketing (6 credits) This course shows how the basic principles of marketing can be applied to the problems of marketing across national boundaries and within foreign countries. Attention is paid to the development of global marketing strategies and to the different approaches needed to market consumer items, industrial goods and services internationally. Prerequisite: BUSI1004 Marketing BUSI0023. Operations and quality management (6 credits) A general introduction to the basic concepts and principles of management of manufacturing and service operations. Emphasis will be on both the quantitative and qualitative aspects of operations management and the intention is to give students moderate exposure to the major topics in operations management. 176 BUSI0025. Advanced topics in investments (6 credits) A course on the modern portfolio theory and the various pricing models of securities. Prerequisite: FINA2802 Investments and portfolio analysis BUSI0026. Employment and labour relations (6 credits) This course intends to give an overview on the fundamentals of labour relations theories pertaining to trade unionism, collective bargaining and workplace labour-management relations. Particular attention is also given to the development of the labour market, employment pattern and labour law in Hong Kong. BUSI0027. Management accounting I (6 credits) The theory and techniques involved in serving the accounting needs of management in the decision making, control, evaluation and motivational aspects. Prerequisite: BUSI1002 Introduction to accounting. Students who have taken BUSI0007 Budgetary planning and control are not allowed to take this course. BUSI0028. Management accounting II (6 credits) A course on advanced problems in managerial accounting and management information and reporting systems for planning and control of operations. In particular it will include problems associated with large decentralized companies - divisional performance control, measurement and evaluation, transfer pricing. Prerequisite: BUSI0027 Management accounting I BUSI0029. Human resource management and business strategy (6 credits) This course proposes to look at the basic concepts of human resource management (HRM) and its application to Hong Kong. Emphasis will be placed on the strategic linkage between HRM and corporate management in the context of business changes and re-structuring. Comparative references will also be made to practices elsewhere in other industrial societies. BUSI0030. Market competition and quality management (6 credits) The objective of this course is to explore the problems and issues involved in the management of quality improvement and market competition. Emphasis will be on the strategic aspects of quality and marketing management and the intention is to give students exposure to important topics like customer value, quality improvement tools, quality concepts and its relationship with different aspects of marketing management. Prerequisite: BUSI1004 Marketing BUSI0031. Marketing research (6 credits) This course will cover the broad principles of marketing research. Emphasis will be placed on the use of marketing research as an aid to decision making. In this spirit students will be introduced to a variety of types of marketing research data. Students will be given the opportunity to engage in practical marketing research based exercises. Prerequisite: BUSI1004 Marketing 177 BUSI0032. Multinational corporations (6 credits) This course studies the multinational enterprise (MNE) and the theoretical approaches that have been formulated to explain the growth and operation of this form of business on an international scale. Recent general theories will be considered in a critical manner to allow judgements to be made on their strengths and limitations. Prerequisite: BUSI1007 Principles of management BUSI0033. Organizational change and development (6 credits) The objective of this course is to explore the problems and issues involved in the management of organizational change and development. Major approaches and attempts to conceptualize the phenomenon will be examined in a critical manner. Particular attention will be paid to problems arising from company formation, entrepreneurial ventures, company expansion and growth, maturity and bureaucratization, corporate failure and recovery. Major strategies for change will be examined. BUSI0034. Human resource: theory and practice (6 credits) A course that draws upon an understanding of organizational behaviour to examine the techniques and practice of HRM. Topics include HRM and corporate strategy, human resource planning, recruitment and selection, performance management, training and development, employee relations. BUSI0035. Production and operations (6 credits) A course to introduce a systems-oriented view of production and operations management. Prerequisites: BUSI0023 Operations and quality management, and BUSI0036 Quantitative analysis for business decisions I BUSI0036. Quantitative analysis for business decisions I (6 credits) A course on the quantitative methods used to solve business problems and make managerial decisions. The course involves the use of computers in the teaching process. Prerequisite: STAT1008/STAT0302 Business statistics or STAT1003 Introductory statistics or STAT1004 Probability and statistics or STAT1001 Elementary statistical methods or STAT1301 Probability & statistics I or STAT1306 Introductory Statistics or ECON1003 Analysis of economic data or equivalent BUSI0037. Quantitative analysis for business decisions II (6 credits) A more advanced course on quantitative methods to problem solving. Topics include mathematical programming, dynamic programming, game theory, reliability, Markov chains, stochastic processes and applications in logistics, finance, marketing, inventory and operations. Prerequisite: BUSI0036 Quantitative analysis for business decisions I or STAT0106 Business logistics BUSI0038. Services marketing (6 credits) The course examines the characteristics of service organizations and how this affects their approach to marketing. Issues in the three dimensions of internal marketing; transactional marketing and external marketing are examined and the role of research analysed. Attention is paid to service culture and service value and the problems are illustrated by examples from Asian, American and European 178 service firms. Prerequisite: BUSI1004 Marketing BUSI0039. The development of modern China (6 credits) The course will examine the historical development of modern China and the emergence of new forces and ideologies in the recent past. This should provide a backcloth for the interpretation of the economic and social events of the present time. BUSI0044. International business (6 credits) This is an introductory course to the field of international business, which will examine contemporary and historical changes in this field. The focus will be on three main areas: international trade, the international payments system and international production. The approach will consider the roles of various actors in these areas, including firms, states and international organizations and will discuss differing explanations of outcomes in each of the main areas that are offered by differing theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: BUSI1002 Introduction to accounting, and BUSI0016/FINA1002 Introduction to finance or FINA1003 Corporate finance, and BUSI0027 Management accounting I, and BUSI1004 Marketing, and BUSI1007 Principles of management or BUSI1005 Organizational behaviour, and ECON1001 Introduction to economics I, and BUSI0036 Quantitative analysis for business decisions I or STAT0302 Business statistics or STAT1306 Introductory statistics BUSI0045. Accounting seminar (6 credits) A course on (a) the nature of accounting theory and research and (b) topical accounting issues. Prerequisite: BUSI0020 Intermediate accounting II BUSI0046. Advanced information systems development (6 credits) This course studies how emerging information technologies affect both the information systems development process and the information systems. Topics include computer-aided software engineering tools, distributed systems, electronic data interchange, and web-based technologies. Students will carry out a field study of a new technology or new techniques. Prerequisites: BUSI0048 Business applications development, and BUSI0052 Database development and management or equivalent BUSI0047. Applied organization (6 credits) This is a course on the design of high performance organization in the modern world. Topics include management structures of control and co-ordination, high-commitment work systems, design of compensation systems, virtual organization and the use of IT, organizational learning, organizational change, organization for cultural synergy, organization of international companies. BUSI0048. Business applications development (6 credits) This course introduces the basic concepts of programme development for business applications with an emphasis on user interface design and development, database design and querying and operating 179 environments. Hands-on experience in selected application systems development tools will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems Remarks: This course is not available to BBA(IS) students. BUSI0049. Business ethics (6 credits) The course introduces concepts and tools that can be used for thinking about ethics and how ethical issues enter into the workplace in the modern world. Students will be guided to recognize ethical issues and dilemmas in business activities; to examine the situational forces at work in various business contexts; to learn the differences between the various approaches to ethics and how they play out in modern society, so as to become better able to devise ways out of ethical dilemmas. Special emphasis will be given to a corporation's responsibility to its shareholders and to society arising from the globalization of business activity, the growing role of government, and the increasing politicization of society. BUSI0050. Consumer behaviour (6 credits) This course is designed to understand how customers behave. It integrates the psychological processes that motivate and direct consumers and organizations in their consumption decisions. Students will learn to apply concepts and measurement tools to managing firms in Hong Kong and Mainland China through exercises, cases and projects. Implications for marketing decisions will be shared. Prerequisite: BUSI1004 Marketing BUSI0051. Current topics in marketing management (6 credits) This course focuses on current topics in managing a firm's marketing functions. Organized along a seminar mode, students will be exposed through their interactions in Hong Kong. Real life experiences and exposures to firms together with indepth intellectual challenges will be emphasized throughout the course. Indepth classroom discussion, management cases and applied business projects will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BUSI1004 Marketing BUSI0052. Database development and management (6 credits) This course studies the principles of design, development and administration of database management systems for business applications. Emphasis will be placed on the user/developer/administrator points of view. Prerequisite: BUSI0048 Business applications development or equivalent Eligibility: Students taking or having taken CSIS0278 are not allowed to take this course. BUSI0053. Decision support and expert systems (6 credits) This course explores a range of modern technologies used to support business decision making. Topics include decision support systems, group support systems, electronic meeting systems, artificial intelligence, expert systems, and neural networks. Both technical and managerial issues related to the development and implementation of decision support systems will be discussed. Prerequisites: BUSI0048 Business applications development, and BUSI0052 Database development and management or equivalent 180 BUSI0054. Developing competencies in business creativity and innovation (6 credits) This is a skill-building course, which aims to develop core entrepreneurial competencies. These competencies are the mental and behavioural skills required for undertaking the various forms of creative and innovative activity. The course builds upon the course on "Entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation". The course design emphasizes self-understanding and self-direction, and will be largely workshop based. Prerequisite: BUSI0015 Entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation BUSI0055. Electronic commerce and virtual businesses (6 credits) This course focuses on business opportunities brought about by the Internet. Students will learn how to use web-based technologies to set up a business. Prerequisites: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems, or CSIS1127 Introduction to information systems BUSI0057. High-performance work systems (6 credits) This course examines the principles and practice of designing and operating systems of work that combine the optimum use of technology with high performance and motivation. Topics include socio-technical systems analysis, teamwork and networking. BUSI0058. Human resource planning and career management (6 credits) This course aims to provide an understanding of how the demand and supply of human resources can be brought into balance, and people already in employment can be helped to develop in their work careers. Topics covered include appraisal, counselling, development and training, and career planning. Ways in which HRM managers can facilitate organizational learning are also examined. BUSI0059. Information systems analysis and design (6 credits) This course examines the application of information technology to business and analyses the various stages of a system development life cycle. Techniques for modeling data and process requirements will be discussed. Prerequisite: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems or CSIS1127 Introduction to information systems Remarks: This course is not available to BBA(IS) students. BUSI0060. Information systems development and project management I (6 credits) This course examines the concepts, techniques, and activities related to information systems development projects. Teams of student will carry out projects that span the entire information systems analysis and design life cycle, including planning and scheduling, cost estimation, risk analysis, team organization, process management and quality assurance. In the process students will become familiar with the use of computer-based tools and managerial techniques used in information systems development projects. Remarks: This course is available to Year III students in BBA(IS) only. 181 BUSI0061. Information systems development and project management II (6 credits) This is a continuation of the course BUSI0060 Information systems development and project management I. Remarks: This course is available to Year III students in BBA IS Major and BBA(IS) only. Prerequisite: BUSI0060 Information systems development and project management I BUSI0062. Information systems management and strategy (6 credits) This course examines various issues related to the managment of information systems in organizations. The link between information systems planning and business strategy will be explored to see how companies can use information systems not only to support their daily operations but to sustain and enhance their strategic advantage. Prerequisite: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems or equivalent BUSI0063. Internet applications development (6 credits) In this course students will learn how to develop Internet-based business applications using the resources, tools and services available on the Internet. Topics include HTML, Java applets, HTTP and CGI, JavaScript, Java Servlets and JSP, Perl, PHP, ASP, Web spiders and search engines, and wireless applications. Prerequisites: Proficiency in Java Programming; and BUSI0048 Business applications development or equivalent; and BUSI0052 Database development and management or equivalent BUSI0064. Leadership workshop (3 credits) This workshop will explore key processes of leadership experientially in a simulated political, social and business environment. The purpose is to provide students with knowledge in leadership theories, models and frameworks with opportunities to experiment with natural and new leadership behaviour in a simulated context. Having gone through these processes in a collective, multi-staged exercise, there will be opportunity for reflection, sharing of experience and integration of practice with theories, in the presence of facilitators. BUSI0065. Information systems security management (6 credits) This course focuses on key issues related to security of Internet-based business applications . Topics include data security, including encryption and authentication. Prerequisite: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems or equivalent BUSI0066. Marketing on the commercial internet (6 credits) This course examines the evolution of the World Wide Web as a powerful tool for selling, distributing and servicing of goods and services. Particular attention will be paid to customer relationship management and its impact on competitive positioning of a firm. Prerequisites: BUSI1004 Marketing, and BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems or equivalent 182 BUSI0067. Mergers and acquisitions (6 credits) A course focusing on the theories and market practices of mergers, acquisitions, corporate restructuring and corporate control. Various valuation, strategic and economic issues are examined through case analysis. Prerequisite: FINA1003 Corporate finance BUSI0068. Multimedia applications development (6 credits) This course introduces various technologies used in multimedia applications. Students will learn how to develop information systems that use text, graphics, sound and video. Prerequisites: BUSI0048 Business applications development, and BUSI0052 Database development and management or equivalent BUSI0070. Reward and compensation (6 credits) This course addresses the design of reward and compensation systems and the contribution they can make to the attainment of an organization's strategic objectives. Among the specific techniques covered are job evaluation, design of incentives, performance-related pay, and non-monetary rewards. BUSI0071. Strategic marketing management (6 credits) This course is designed as a capstone course that integrates a firm's marketing decisions. It covers a firm's strategic market orientation, its allocation of resources and effectiveness of its marketing strategies. The course emphasizes managerial implications for different types of firms. Students will learn how to apply the course contents through indepth studies of firms, research projects and management cases. Prerequisites: BUSI1004 Marketing BUSI0072. Team building programme (3 credits) The objective of the workshop is to explore key aspects of group dynamics through a process of experiential learning. The aspects that we shall be considering include leadership and communication, planning and organizing, decision-making and problem solving, trust and team building in the context of business and management. The activities you will undertake consist of a series of problems to be resolved through the combined efforts of your group members. The problems are physical in nature, rather than hypothetical and cognitive, and require the application of organizational skills for successful and efficient solutions. BUSI0073. Data communications and networking management (6 credits) This course introduces telecommunications and computing networks used in support of business activities. Topics include data, voice, image and communication technologies; networking and communication architectures; and protocols and standards. Prerequisite: BUSI0059 Information systems analysis and design or equivalent Eligibility: Students taking or having taken CSIS0234 are not allowed to take this course. BUSI0074. Telecommunications policy (6 credits) This course provides an overview of recent developments of the telecommunications industry in Hong Kong and around Asia-Pacific. Telecommunications infrastructure policies introduced by respective 183 governments in the region and the impacts of these policies on business operations will be examined. Prerequisite: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems or equivalent BUSI0075. Current topics in human resource management (6 credits) This course focuses on current topics in managing a firm's human resource management functions. Indepth classroom discussion, management cases and applied business projects will be emphasized. BUSI0076. Current topics in information systems (6 credits) This course discusses the contemporary areas of information systems, including emerging technologies and the way they affect businesses. BUSI0077. Selections and training (6 credits) This course will focus on the basic concepts of selections and recruitment, training and development of different employees, and human resources utility analysis. In particular, students will be exposed to different recruiting process and the whole spectrum of training and development techniques and demonstrates how they can add value to business success. BUSI0078. Compensation and benefits (6 credits) This course will focus on the basic concepts of pay and compensation policy of different employees. In particular, students will be exposed to the fundamental pay and benefits administration, along with the importance of rewards and the impact of rewards on employee attraction, motivation and retention. BUSI0080. International financial management (6 credits) The international corporation and its environment. Forex markets, Forex risk management. International working capital management. International treasury management. Foreign investment and capital budgeting. International financial markets: Euro-currency, Euro-bond, and Euro-notes markets. BUSI0082. Professional preparation program I (No credit) To prepare BBA and BBA(Acc&Fin) Year 1 students for a career in professional accounting, this noncredit course is a full-year course including a series of seminar/workshop discussing career opportunities and professional ethics, developing interpersonal, communication and time-management skills and also social events providing opportunities to interact with accounting and business professionals. Class meets once a month for an hour and half during the first academic year. Pass/Fail grade. BUSI0083. Professional preparation program II (No credit) To prepare BBA(Acc&Fin) Year 2 students for a career in professional accounting, this non-credit course is a full-year course including presentations by leading business and accounting professionals on current business and accounting issues and seminars/workshops developing skills in job search, interview, leadership and organization. Class meets once a month for an hour and half during the second academic year. Pass/Fail grade. 184 BUSI0084. Advanced topics in auditing (6 credits) This course extends the first Auditing course to further examine various advanced topics including advanced auditing techniques, auditing for operations and efficiency, auditing web based information, EDP auditing, environmental auditing, forensic accounting and contemporary issues of auditing. Prerequisites: BUSI0006 Auditing, and BUSI0003 Advanced Financial Accounting BUSI0085. Advanced topics in taxation (6 credits) The course is an in-depth review of the law and practice of taxation for planning and management in the Hong Kong environment. The subject will discuss how international tax principles affect foreign direct investment decisions and highlight the relationships between the international tax principles and the local tax system. General discussion of the Mainland tax system will also be included. Prerequisite: BUSI0018 Hong Kong Taxation BUSI0086. Controllership (6 credits) This course is a comprehensive examination of the diverse functions of a controller within the contemporary business enterprise. Topics cover include strategic cost management, the advanced use of information for management planning, control and decision making, the evaluation of incentive and performance measurement systems as well as international and contemporary management accounting issues. Prerequisites: BUSI0028 Management Accounting II BUSI0087. Business case analysis (3 credits) This course is designed to show students how to deal with complex business issues. Most business issues are complex and multifaceted. It puts students in a rich teaching and learning environment that encourages asking the right questions, formulating problems, and discovering and designing doable courses of action. Through a large number of case studies students learn to think laterally, develop a variety of ideas, explore their leadership potential within groups, and communicate their ideas articulately. Remarks: This course is available to Year II or above students of the Faculty of Business and Economics only. BUSI0088. Artificial Intelligence for Business Applications (6 credits) This course focuses on the fundamentals of artificial intelligence (AI), with emphasis on business applications. Students will gain hands-on experience in developing and using different AI tools to solve real-world business problems. Topics include AI algorithms, intelligent agents, document management, expert systems, and data mining. Prerequisites: Proficiency in Java Programming, and BUSI0048 Business applications development or equivalent; and BUSI0052 Database development and management or equivalent BUSI0089. Studies on China's competitiveness (6 credits) Studies on China's Competitiveness will focus on the competitiveness of the economy and industries of Mainland China and examine China's competitiveness on a regional, industry and activity basis. Globalization and China's accession to WTO will present unprecedented opportunities and challenges for China's economy and industries. As such, China's position in the globalized world economic system and its ability to move up the value-added ladder is critical to its sustainable economic development. Given Hong Kong's close links to the economy of the Chinese Mainland, China's 185 economic future will heavily influence that of every industry in Hong Kong. Through a detailed analysis of a cross section of Chinese industries, the course will help the students to have a better understanding of the current status of China's competitiveness and future dynamics. BUSI0090. The European business environment (6 credits) This course is intended for those who wish to study the evolution of the European Business Environment and the processes by which it operates. It investigates the broader political, cultural, economic, legal and philosophical basis of the business milieu mostly in Western Europe but with, when appropriate, reference to the Eastern European states. It includes the typologies of businesses as conducted in selected states where the free market, remnants of state control and the regional and global influences all have a part to play. Teaching would be based on lectures, case studies and simulations with visiting lectures from various Consulates to enrich the content. Assessment: For this course the assessment would be by one written final examination of two hours carrying 60% of the total, one individual submission based on a case study (25%) and one group classroom session in analysis of a business problem (15%). BUSI0091. Business intelligent systems (6 credits) This course is designed to provide an overview of business intelligent systems (BIS) and their use in the business environment. Topics include business intelligent systems/technology concepts, introduction to various BIS (e.g., Knowledge Management Systems), and business cases for BIS development and adoption. Prerequisite: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems BUSI0092. Advanced database management & data mining (6 credits) The course consists of two parts. In the first part advanced database concepts such as views, triggers, stored procedures, SQL*Plus, database administration and performance tuning. In the second part, various techniques in data mining such as decision trees, neural networks, and clustering will be covered. Student will be exposed to the applications of these techniques in business. Prerequisite: BUSI0052 Database development and management or CSIS0278 Introduction to database management systems BUSI0093. Enterprise resource planning systems (6 credits) This course provides an overview of enterprise resource planning systems and their use in the business environment. Topics include business processes management, functions and data requirements, and systems implementation and integration. Prerequisite: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems BUSI0094. Managing business transformation (6 credits) The course provides a roadmap for managers planning to transform their companies into an internetworked enterprise where shared infrastructures are used to link customers, suppliers, partners and employees to create superior economic value. It covers business strategy, infrastructure, process management, and integration and implementation. The course is based on the premise that integrating Internet technologies throughout the value chain is crucial in building and managing customer relationships and thus brand equity. Prerequisite: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems 186 BUSI0095. Critical thinking and business judgment (6 credits) To succeed in today complex and rapidly changing business environment managers must be able to 1) analyze (the separating of a whole into its component parts), 2) synthesize (the combining of often diverse conceptions into a coherent whole), 3) make judgment (the forming an opinion or evaluation by discerning and comparing), and 4) sell their ideas (the ability to articulate with the objective of influencing others). This course relies on the case method to instill and foster these skills. Students will learn how to identify appropriate sources of information, sieve through information, differentiate between major and minor issues, analyze new developments, synthesize different ideas and ultimately articulate their thoughts to others. In the process students will learn how to ask the right questions, explore the tradeoffs involved in managerial decisions, and discover and design doable courses of action. Prerequisite: This course is open only to second- and third-year students. Remarks: Students having completed BUSI0013 Current business affairs (3 credits) and BUSI0087 Business case analysis (3 credits) are not allowed to take this course. BUSI1001. Business law (6 credits) An introduction to the Hong Kong legal system, the fundamentals and general principles of Hong Kong law, and other legal concepts which a manager may be expected to encounter in the business environment. BUSI1005. Organizational behaviour (6 credits) A course on the concepts and key research findings which can help us to understand the human behaviour in organizations. Topics include motivation, leadership theory, group dynamics, morale, communications, control techniques and organizational culture. Prerequisite: BUSI1007 Principles of management BUSI2111. Information systems in accounting (6 credits) Design and evaluation of computer-based accounting information system, analysis of efficient and effective business processes and include current topics such as Enterprise Resource Planning, interorganizational solutions and computer security. Prerequisites: BUSI1002 Introduction to accounting, and BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems BUSI2112. Information systems audit and control (6 credits) This course is designed to provide an overview of computer information systems auditing and control and its application in the business environment, and is intended for general business students. Topics include information systems audit process, information technology governance, systems and infrastructure lifecycle management, information technology service delivery and support, protection of information assets, as well as disaster recovery and business continuity planning. BUSI3001. Global analysis team project (6 credits) The primary objective of this course is to develop the students' capability to understand the strategic situation in a business, economic, social, political and/or environmental aspect in the global arena. Students are also expected to devise viable alternatives for dealing with the key issues facing it. They will partner with students from overseas universities to work on this global analysis team project in their final year of study. 187 BUSI3002. Leadership development programme (3 credits) This course aims at enabling students to develop themselves as leaders of organizations and to embark on paths of personal leadership development. The following concepts will be covered: motivation, lifelong leadership development, personal leadership development plan, stress and adversity management, peer mentoring, group dynamics, work and life balance as well as purpose-driven leadership. BUSI3011. Corporate governance and social responsibility (6 credits) In this course, students learn about the complex responsibilities facing business leaders today. It will explore the use of accounting information and internal control in ensuring efficient and effective operations, reducing the cost of capital, production and distribution, and complying with legal, regulatory and corporate oversight requirements. It also teaches students about ethics and governance systems that leaders can use to promote socially responsible conduct by organizations and their employees, and shows how personal values can play a critical role in effective leadership. BUSI3012. International and cross-boundary trade law (6 credits) This course covers the legal aspects of the international trade. It also provides students with background on international legal framework for cross-border trading and business activities, as China embarks on liberalization of its business environment as a member of the World Trade Organization. BUSI3111. Current topics on assurance services (6 credits) Study of selected topics of application of auditing standards and procedures, auditor responsibilities and ethical behavior, internal control and corporate governance issues. Remarks: Students having completed BUSI0006 Auditing (6 credits) are not allowed to take this course. BUSI3112. Current topics on advanced financial reporting (6 credits) Study of selected topics of theory and concept of financial accounting, consolidated financial statements, application of financial reporting standards and other financial reporting topics. Prerequisite: BUSI0020 Intermediate Accounting II Remarks: Students having completed BUSI0003 Advanced Financial Accounting (6 credits) are not allowed to take this course. BUSI3113. Current topics on China accounting, auditing and taxation (3 credits) A Year 3 elective course examining the accounting standards setting environment in China, the China Accounting, Auditing and Taxation standards/rules issued and their unique aspects and implications for the Accounting profession. Prerequisites: BUSI0020 Intermediate Accounting II or BUSI0028 Management Accounting II or BUSI0006 Auditing, and BUSI0018 Hong Kong Taxation. BUSI3511. Selected topics in marketing strategy (6 credits) This course is designed to focus on selected topics that are of salience to managing firm marketing strategies and operations in Mainland China or Hong Kong. It may include but not restricted to the following contemporary marketing issues including branding, new product development, marketing 188 high-technology products and customer relationship management. BUSI3512. Developing marketing competence through branding (6 credits) Why do companies need brands and how do they develop brands? Why do brands fail? Are there ways to manage brands so that they last? What are the challenges facing a brand manager? Interested in finding answers to the above questions? Prepared for a hands-on learning of the brand development process? Then this course is for you. Through theories and concepts, case analyses, problem sets, class debates and project assignments, this course aims to provide students with a capacity to think creatively and with increased precision about the strategies and tactics involved in building, leveraging, defending, and sustaining strong brands. To prepare students for the customerdriven marketing challenges facing a brand manager, this course draws insights from psychological, sociological, and anthropological theories of consumer behavior. BUSI3601. Supply chain management (6 credits) The course introduces students to concepts, strategies, and technologies related to supply chain management. The course focuses on the systems approach to planning, analysis, design, development, and management of supply chain. Using cases and real-life projects students will learn how to use appropriate information technologies to reduce cost and improve service in supply chain Pre-requisite: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems or equivalent BUSI3602. Information technology and entrepreneurship (6 credits) This course introduces students to the core concepts of entrepreneurship with a special emphasis on those entrepreneurial settings involving the use of information technology. Students will be exposed to the key processes, challenges, risks and rewards of starting up an entrepreneurial business and are expected to apply the concepts and knowledge learned in the course to develop a business plan that could be presented to potential investors and venture capitalists. Pre-requisites: BUSI1003 Introduction to management information systems, and BUSI1007 Principles of management 189 DESCRIPTION FOR UNDERGRADUATE COURSES OFFERED BY SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND FINANCE 2007-08 "ECON1001 Introduction to Economics I" is a prerequisite for all year 2 and year 3 Economics and Finance courses. Additional prerequisites are specified in the descriptions for the courses concerned. Not all courses listed below will necessarily be offered every year. YEAR ONE ECON0003. Great economists of our time (3 credits) Through the biographies of 12 of the great economists of the 20th century, this course introduces students to the power of economic analysis of real world observations and problems, and in a broader context, to the fascination of intellectual pursuits. This course also serves to illustrate the central ideas of economics, which are still very much in use today. ECON1001. Introduction to economics I (6 credits) An introduction to the basic concepts and principles of microeconomics - the study of demand and supply, consumer theory, cost and production, market structure, and resource allocation efficiency. ECON1002. Introduction to economics II (6 credits) This course is an introduction to macroeconomics the study of business cycle fluctuations and long run economic growth. Topics include the measurement of national economic performance; the problems of recession, unemployment, and inflation; money supply, government spending, and taxation; fiscal and monetary policies for full employment and price stability; the determination of the exchange rate; and international trade and payments. ECON1003. Analysis of economic data (6 credits) This course studies the measurement and interpretation of economic variables, and how to model their relationships using appropriate empirical methods. Topics include interpretation of headline statistics, describing economic aggregates, modeling of economic relationships and drawing conclusions from observations. Remarks: Not open to students taking or having taken STAT0301, STAT0302, STAT0601, STAT0602, STAT1000, STAT1001, STAT1003, STAT1006, STAT1007, STAT1008, STAT1301, STAT1306 or STAT1801. FINA0003. Current Asian finance: issues, ideas and practices (3 credits) This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the most important issues in Asian financial markets, develop their interests and knowledge in areas related to business and finance in Asia (with a focus on Hong Kong), and give them hands-on experience in writing reports and presenting analytical results. Remarks: Open only to students of the Faculty of Business and Economics. _________________________________________________________________________________ FINA1002. Introduction to finance (6 credits) An introduction about the basic aspects of financial management: managing the company's sources and uses of funds as well as a general understanding of the key issues involving the raising and using of long term funds. There will be extensive use of a spreadsheet software (Excel) in lectures and its use is also 190 expected in homework assignments. After finishing the course, students should have a basic knowledge of financial statements and cash flows, an understanding of the major securities used in the financing of companies. They would also be conversant with fundamental financial techniques like compounding, discounting and capital budgeting and be able to apply them for personal financing decisions. Remarks: (1) It is advisable to take BUSI1002 Introduction to accounting prior to this course. (2) Not open to students admitted to 1st year of study in the Faculty of Business and Economics in 2006-07 or after (including BEcon, BFin, BEcon&Fin and business students). (3) Students admitted to 1st year of study in 2006-07 or after majoring or minoring in finance are required to take FINA1003 Corporate Finance.Mutually exclusive course: BUSI0016 Introduction to finance and FINA1003 Corporate finance FINA1003. Corporate finance (6 credits) This is an introductory course that develops the basic concepts and tools applicable to corporate financial decisions. Three main tasks of financial managers are studied: (i) investment evaluation, (ii) financing decisions, and (iii) payout decisions. Specific topics include present value calculation, valuation of stocks and bonds, investment criteria and capital budgeting, risk and return, cost of capital, capital structure, raising capital, dividend policy, and working capital management. Prerequisite: BUSI1002 Introduction to Accounting Remarks: Not open to BEcon, BFin, BEcon&Fin students admitted to 1st year of study in 200506 or before. Mutually exclusive course: BUSI0016/FINA1002 Introduction to finance YEAR TWO ECON0701. Introductory econometrics (6 credits) Econometrics is the branch of economics that formulates statistical methodology for use in analyzing economic data. Consequently, the objective of this course is to prepare students for basic empirical work in economics. In particular, topics will include multiple regression analysis, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, functional form specification, time series models, and limited dependent variable models. Students will have the opportunity to use actual economic data to test economic theories. Prerequisite: ECON1003 Analysis of economic data or STAT0301 Elementary statistical methods or STAT0302 Business statistics or STAT1301 Probability & statistics I or STAT1306 Introductory statistics Remarks: Not open to students taking or having taken STAT2301, STAT2804, STAT3301 or STAT3302. ECON2101. Microeconomic theory (6 credits) The laws of demand, supply, returns, and costs; price and output determination in different market situations; theory of factor pricing and income distribution; general equilibrium; interest and capital. Mutually exclusive course: ECON2113 Microeconomic analysis. ECON2102. Macroeconomic theory (6 credits) Theories of income, employment, and the price level; analysis of secular growth and business fluctuations; introduction to monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: ECON1002 Introduction to economics II Mutually exclusive course: ECON2114 Macroeconomic analysis 191 ECON2113. Microeconomic analysis (6 credits) Examine microeconomic issues with applications. Topics include: consumer behaviour, cost structure, market structure, theory of the firm, factor market and general equilibrium. Remarks: Open only to non-BEcon, non-BFin and non-BEcon&Fin students. Mutually exclusive course: ECON2101 Microeconomic theory ___________________________________________________________________________ ECON2114. Macroeconomic analysis (6 credits) Economics of inflation, unemployment, income and output determination in the short run and the long run. Money, interest rates and exchange rates. Macroeconomic stabilization policies and open economy macroeconomic issues. Remarks: Open only to non-BEcon, non-BFin and non-BEcon&Fin students. Mutually exclusive course: ECON2102 Macroeconomic theory FINA0301. Derivative securities (6 credits) To provide a comprehensive analysis of the properties of options and futures and to offer a theoretical framework within which all derivatives can be valued and hedged. Topics covered: simple arbitrage relationships for forward and futures contracts, hedging and basis risk, stock index futures, swaps, trading strategies involving options, valuation of options using a binomial model and the BlackScholes analysis, options on interest rates, stock indices, currencies and futures, and exotic options. Prerequisite: For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2005-06 or before: - BUSI0016/FINA1002 Introduction to finance For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2006-07 or after: - FINA1003 Corporate finance Mutually exclusive course: BUSI0069 Derivative securities and STAT2808 Derivatives markets FINA2802. Investments and portfolio analysis (6 credits) This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of investments and to major issues currently of concern to all investors. The concepts and skills developed from this course enable students to conduct a sophisticated assessment of current issues and debates covered by both the popular media as well as more-specialized finance journals. We emphasize on equity part and the main topics include: portfolio theory, equilibrium in capital markets, equity valuation, portfolio performance evaluation, and relevant institutional details. This course is essential to those planning to become an investment professional or a sophisticated individual investor. Prerequisite: For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2005-06 or before: - BUSI0016/FINA1002 Introduction to finance For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2006-07 or after: - FINA1003 Corporate finance YEAR TWO OR YEAR THREE ELECTIVES (ECONOMICS COURSES) ECON0103. Economics of human resources (6 credits) This course studies the allocation of human resources through the labour market and the utilisation of human resources inside the firm. Issues related to investment in human capital, wage determination, labour force participation, worker mobility, hiring decisions and other personnel practices are examined. 192 ECON0104. Public finance (6 credits) Study of the role of government in the economy, using microeconomic theory. The course covers public expenditure analysis and methods of financing government expenditures. It explores the underlying theory of welfare economics as well as the economic effects of public policy such as public sector pricing, expenditure and tax policies. ECON0106. Games and decisions (6 credits) This course offers an introduction to game theory. It covers core concepts in game theory and its applications. The core concepts include sequential games, game tree, subgame-perfect equilibrium, simultaneous games, game table, Nash equilibrium in pure strategies, mixed-strategy Nash equilibrium, and expected utility. These concepts are used to provide analyses of the role of reputation, and penalties and rewards in sustaining cooperation; the importance of credibility in commitments, threats and promises; the problems, and solutions, of public goods and externalities; behavior under asymmetric information: moral hazard, adverse selection, signaling, and screening; and interaction between individuals when the assumption of perfect rationality is relaxed. ECON0107. History of economic thought (6 credits) This course is a survey of key developments in economic thought since the 18th century, with emphasis on works in English. The first lectures review the writings of classical economists like Smith, Ricardo, and Mill, with an aside on Marx. The lectures then go on to discuss the development of neoclassical theory from Jevons to Marshall and the Cambridge School, and mathematical modelers like Fisher, Pareto, Wicksell, Hicks, and Samuelson. If time allows, we will trace the evolution of macroeconomics from Keynes to the neoclassical synthesis, monetarism, and new classical economics. ECON0109. Topics in macroeconomics (6 credits) This course provides students with an up-to-date account of the theory and practice of modern macroeconomics. The following areas that have shaped modern macroeconomic research will be covered: real business cycle theory, endogenous growth theory, and new Keynesian theories of labour markets, asset markets and stick prices. Other selected topics on fiscal and monetary policy will also be discussed. Prerequisites: ECON2101 Microeconomic theory or ECON2113 Microeconomic analysis, and ECON2102 Macroeconomic theory or ECON2114 Macroeconomic analysis ECON0204. The economics of finance (6 credits) A survey of the economic theory underlying corporate and investment finance models, with an emphasis on financial instruments. Topics include: balance sheet management and evaluation, capital market equilibrium and efficiency, evolution of credit and money market instruments like financial swaps, stocks and bonds, financial futures and options. Eurocurrencies and the role played by banks, insurance companies and other financial institutions. ECON0205. Theories of investment (6 credits) Applications of the theory of choice over time (capital theory) to the investment decisions of individuals, firms and economies, under different assumptions regarding certainty, uncertainty, and adjustment costs. Mutually exclusive course: ECON0210 Investment, technology, and economic growth 193 ECON0206. Capital theory (6 credits) General equilibrium theory involving time under certainty conditions. The concepts of full information, stationary state, and steady state. Assumptions about information costs, transaction costs and complete markets. Fisher's separation theorem. Theory of consumption over discrete and continuous time. Theory of production over discrete and continuous time. Determination of general equilibrium over time. Intertemporal prices and interest rates. ECON0207. Monetary economics (6 credits) This course discusses the role of money in the economy, including how money affects inflation, interest rates and output and employment in both the static and dynamic contexts. Related topics are theories of money demand and supply, the conduct of monetary policy, rules vs. discretion, adaptive and rational expectations, time inconsistency, origin of money, and electronic means of payments . ECON0208. Economics of banking (6 credits) This course examines the functions and behaviour of banks from an economic rather than a management perspective. Topics include origin of financial intermediaries, banks vs. non-bank financial institutions, organization of the banking industry, lender-borrower relationship, equilibrium credit rationing, banks as delegated monitors, banks in the macroeconomy, bank runs and systematic risks, risk management of the banking firm, and the regulation of banks. ECON0209. Finance and development (6 credits) This course studies the interaction between the financial sector and the rest of the economy, that is, how financial markets and institutions affect economic performance and vice versa. Topics include flow-of-funds accounts, financial structure and economic development, financial repression, financial liberalization and financial deepening, financial reform in developing and transition economies, banking crises and currency crises, capital account liberalization, the globalization of world capital markets, and financial policies and regulation. ECON0210. Investment, technology, and economic growth (6 credits) The course begins by reviewing the neoclassical theory of investment in `physical' assets like plant and machinery, at the micro- and macro- levels. The analysis is then extended to incorporate technological change, especially with regard to its impact on the relationship between investment and economic growth. As far as possible, the exposition will be non-technical. Mutually exclusive course: ECON0205 Theories of investment. ECON0301. Theory of international trade (6 credits) The theory of international trade: the bases, direction, terms, volume, and gains of trade. The effects of tariffs, quantitative restrictions, and international integration. ECON0302. International finance (6 credits) The course is an introduction to an evolving and growing literature on international finance. Topics covered in the course include the international monetary system, the concept of balance of payments, theories of balance of payments, parity conditions, models of exchange rate determination, forward- 194 looking market instruments (forward, futures, and options markets), Eurocurrency markets, and financial crises. ECON0401. Comparative economic systems (6 credits) Alternative approaches to the understanding of the operation of economic systems, including an approach based on different structures of property rights. ECON0402. Industrial organization (6 credits) This course studies the pricing and output decisions of firms and the performance of the market under various market structures. Topics include theories of oligopoly; product differentiation; the effects of imperfect and asymmetric information; the examination of pricing practices such as price discrimination, tie-in selling, and resale price maintenance; collusion and anti-competitive behaviours, and public policies related to the promotion or restriction of competition. ECON0403. The economics of property rights (6 credits) Implications of different structures of property rights for economic behaviour; rights structures classified in terms of exclusivity and transferability; costs of enforcing rights and of forming contracts as main constraints in the derivation of hypotheses; the Coase Theorem and the theories associated with contracting. ECON0405. The economics of law (6 credits) Economic analysis applied to law. Topics may include: efficiency of law, rules of liability, tort rights and remedies, criminal sanction, legislative processes as resource allocating and income distributing mechanisms. ECON0406. The economy and the state (6 credits) Economic analysis is applied to the study of public choice and the relationship between the state and the economy. Topics include: social choice, collective action, voting and elections, interest groups, bureaucracy, constitutions, law and courts, property rights and institutional change. ECON0501. Economic development (6 credits) Characteristics of underdevelopment; factors in economic development; theoretical and policy aspects of development. ECON0503. Urban economics (6 credits) Urban economics is the study of the location choices of firms and households. It examines the question of the where of economic activity, a question largely ignored by the other branches of economics. Topics include the growth and development of cities; land use within cities; urban transportation; housing and public policy; urban problems such as pollution, poverty and crime; and market forces determining the locations of ports and other transshipment points. 195 ECON0504. Transportation economics (6 credits) Microeconomic theory applied to transportation, with an emphasis placed on intercity freight and passenger transportation. Topics include: cost function approach to transport supply, economies of scale and traffic density, structure of demand among discrete modal choices, value of time, forecasting of demand and modal split, optimal pricing and investment in infrastructure, contestable markets and the theory of network competition, and regulation of rates, entry and exit. ECON0601. Economic development of China (6 credits) An analytical study of the major problems in China's economic development since 1949. Topics include: economic heritage, development strategy, economic organization, planning, management, reform, and an evaluation of the Chinese experiments. ECON0602. Foreign trade and investment in China (6 credits) This course has three parts: China trade, Chinese financial markets and direct investment in China. For China trade, topics include: structure and trend of Chinese exports and imports, reform of Chinese foreign trade regime, foreign exchange rate regime and China's role in the new trade environment under the World Trade Organization. For Chinese financial markets, emphasis will be placed on Chinese financial institutions and markets including: the central banking system, the commercial banking industry, government and corporate debt markets, the stock market, and the foreign exchange market. For direct investment in China, theories of corporate finance and corporate governance will be used to analyze the behaviour of Chinese enterprises and the implications of such behaviour for foreign joint ventures. Government regulations will also be covered. ECON0603. The economic system of Hong Kong (6 credits) The course provides a comprehensive discussion of the salient aspects of the Hong Kong economy. Topics include Hong Kong's national income accounting and economic development, the monetary system and exchange rate regime, the financial system, public finance and fiscal policy, external trade and foreign investment, economic relations with the Mainland, the labour market and employment, the property market and housing policy, regulation of public utilities and competition policy, industrial development and policy, and income distribution. Emphasis will be given to both economic analysis and institutional arrangements of the major economic sectors and related policies. Attention will be given to topics of recent public concern. ECON0605. Economic history of China (6 credits) An overview of China's economy in the past 1,000 years and its relation with the rest of the world. Growth in productivity and population, development of transportation and market infrastructure, money and credit in the Song/Yuan and Ming/Qing era. China's foreign trade in medieval and early modern times. European discovery of the New World and its impact on China's economy and trade. Comparisons of Ming/Qing China with early modern Europe. Reasons why China fell behind and why the Industrial Revolution did not happen in Ming/Qing China. Implications for the 21st century. ECON0606. Current economic affairs (6 credits) This seminar-style course is designed to train students to analyse economic problems of the day, particularly those relating to the Hong Kong economy. Students are expected to conduct supervised research on current economic problems and to lead and participate in classroom discussions. 196 ECON0702. Mathematical methods in economics (6 credits) The main emphasis of the course is to explain the mathematical structure of some undergraduate level economic theories, in terms of the way in which each particular mathematical assumption is translated into their economic counterpart. The course covers multi-variable unconstrained maximization, constrained maximization, comparative statics, and a brief introduction to some dynamic economic models. ECON0703. Mathematical economics (6 credits) Modern economic theory treated mathematically. Topics may include: applications of optimization to choice theory, applications of the implicit function theorem to comparative statics, applications of differential and difference equations to stability of equilibrium, applications of linear mathematics and fixed point theorems to Leontief and Arrow-Debreu models, and applications of optimal control theory and dynamic programming to certainty and stochastic dynamic optimization models. ECON0706. Uncertainty and information (6 credits) This course examines the effects of uncertainty and imperfect information on individual decision making and on market equilibrium. Topics may include the expected utility hypothesis, risk bearing and risk sharing, search, adverse selection, signaling, contract theory, mechanism design, information acquisition and information transmission. Prerequisite: ECON2101 Microeconomic theory or ECON2113 Microeconomic analysis ECON0707. Economic forecasting (6 credits) This course introduces basic techniques in forecasting economic structural relationships. Topics include smoothing, filters, arima models, unit roots and stochastic trends, vector autoregressions, cointegration and error correction, regime switching, volatility, diagnostics, model selection, forecast evaluation and combination. Prerequisite: ECON0701 Introductory econometrics ECON3108. Selected topics in price theory (6 credits) This course acts as a platform to provide an overview of topics that are conceived to be pivotal in economics. The topics are essentially micro-based, but have applications in other disciplines like macroeconomics and finance. Specific topics are picked by the instructor. Previous examples include venture capital and private equity, antitrust, competition policy, property rights, theory of the firm, incomplete contracting, financial contracting, bankruptcy, and corporate voting. Prerequisite: ECON2101 Microeconomic theory or ECON2113 Microeconomic analysis ECON3505. Project evaluation (6 credits) This course covers the economic evaluation of projects from a public sector viewpoint using microeconomic tools. It explores the normative aspects of evaluating public projects and policies, the measurement of welfare change and public investment criteria, and employs basic financial analysis. Economic and financial evaluation of government projects and Build-Operate-Transfer infrastructure projects (so-called BOT projects) will be discussed. 197 YEAR THREE ELECTIVES (ECONOMICS COURSES) ECON3801. Reading course (6 credits) This course consists of supervised reading and written work. Candidates may specialize in one topic under the supervision of faculty members of the School of Economics and Finance. Examples of topics are: the problem of social cost, investment in human capital, general equilibrium theory, empirical methods in international trade, international monetary relations, theories of saving and the East Asian economies, and current economic problems of Hong Kong. Candidates must submit the title of their project within the first two weeks of the semester for approval by the Director of the School of Economics and Finance. An original project paper is required in lieu of a written paper in the Examination. The project paper must be completed and presented not later than the first day of the assessment period for that semester. Candidates shall submit a statement that the project paper represent their own work (or in the case of joint work, a statement countersigned by their co-worker(s), which shows the degree of their work) undertaken after the registration in the course. ECON3802. Dissertation (12 credits) Candidates may write a dissertation under the supervision of faculty members of the School of Economics and Finance. Topics offered may vary from year to year, depending on the research interests of the lecturer. A satisfactory dissertation may be offered in lieu of two written papers in the Examination. Candidates must submit the title and an outline of their dissertation for approval by the Director of the School of Economics and Finance not later than December 1 of the final year of the curriculum, and the dissertationshall be completed and presented not later than the first day of the assessment period for the second semester. (Note: The course extends over two semesters. Candidates must enroll in the first semester.) Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above at the time of enrolment Remarks: Open only to BEcon/BEcon&Fin students and students major in Economics. YEAR TWO OR YEAR THREE ELECTIVES (FINANCE COURSES) FINA0102. Financial markets and institutions (6 credits) This course is designed to introduce and analyze the structure, operations and functions of the financial system. The course starts with an introduction to financial markets' role in the economy, and the determination of interest rates and valuation of cash flows. The course then discusses various financial markets including money markets, bond markets, mortgage markets, stock markets and derivatives markets. Financial institutions will be discussed with an emphasis on their major functions and operations. Prerequisite: For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2005-06 or before: - BUSI0016/FINA1002 Introduction to finance For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2006-07 or after: - FINA1003 Corporate finance FINA0103. International banking (6 credits) Nature of international banking. Comparison with domestic banking. Jurisdiction and regulatory framework: the Basle Concordat. Xeno-currency markets and international banking. International financing techniques: loan syndication, project finance, NIFs, RUFs etc. Risk exposure and control: sovereign risk, country risk, exchange risk, interest risk and credit risk. Management and strategies of 198 international banks. "National treatment" and financial centres. FINA0104. Management of commercial banks (6 credits) This course introduces basic bank management techniques that include: asset and liability management, liquidity and reserve management, credit analysis, loan pricing and off-balance-sheet banking. Regulatory issues of commercial banks are also discussed. FINA0105. International financial management (6 credits) The course studies corporate financial decisions in an international setting. We start with basic concepts of international financial markets. These concepts include the global foreign exchange market and its operations, the international capital market, the global bond market, the international equity markets, and cross-border portfolio investment. Then, we discuss corporate financial decision issues including risk management, investment, capital structure, capital budgeting, and cash management in the global context. FINA0106. Insurance: theory and practice (6 credits) Insurance is the study of risk financing through risk pooling. The use of insurance to reduce the adverse financial impact in case of a loss has become an important element of financial and risk management in our society. This course will cover the theories underlying each major type of insurance products; the characteristics of the contractual agreements pertaining to insurance products; the structure of the insurance industry and its impact on the pricing of insurance products; the operation of insurance companies and the need for government regulations of the industry. FINA0302. Theories of corporate finance (6 credits) A course on the advanced treatment of corporate financial decisions. Topics to be covered include corporate valuation; cost of capital; capital structure; leasing; mergers and acquisitions; options; warrants; and convertible bonds. Prerequisite: For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2005-06 or before: - BUSI0016/FINA1002 Introduction to finance For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2006-07 or after: - FINA1003 Corporate finance FINA0303 Case studies in corporate finance (6 credits) This course is structured around the most important financial decisions made at firm level in an uncertain environment. For examples: what capital structure to adopt (financing decision); how to value a firm or investment project (investment/valuation decision); how to raise capital in the equity market (IPO decision); what mechanisms to put in place to discipline manager and the largest shareholder (corporate governance decision); whether to return cash and how to return cash to investors (dividend/share repurchase decision); and whether a firm should engage in mergers and acquisitions (M&A) activities and how to do an M&A right (M&A decision). This course exposes students to some of the most fundamental issues in corporate finance today as well as some of the most important advances in corporate finance of the last decade. It will offer students an opportunity to understand how the concepts and theories of corporate finance are applied in real world and generate lasting impact on firm values, a driving issue faced and constantly asked by CFOs and CEOs. This course will be taught using a case-oriented approach. Pre-requisites: BUSI0016 Introduction to finance or FINA1002 Introduction to finance or FINA1003 Corporate finance. 199 (in addition to the pre-requisite ECON1001 Introduction to Economics I) FINA0401. Empirical finance (6 credits) This course is a survey and introduction to the empirical research methods commonly used in the analysis of financial markets and how they are applied to actual market data. Topics may include: properties and patterns of returns, tests of asset pricing models and term structure models, efficient markets hypothesis and return anomalies, event study methodology, and estimating time-varying volatility models. Prerequisite: ECON0701 Introductory econometrics FINA0402. Mathematical finance (6 credits) Arbitrage Theory. Properties of the portfolio frontier. Two fund separation. Valuation of state contingent claims. Derivative assets analysis. Multiperiod securities markets. Differential information. FINA0501. Asian financial institutions (6 credits) History and institutional aspects of financial markets in Hong Kong, Mainland China, Japan, Singapore and other Asian economies. Regulatory policies and practices. FINA0804. Fixed income securities (6 credits) An integrated analysis of the market institutions, theory and empirical evidence in the area of fixedincome markets. Topics covered: Treasury markets, bond mathematics, arbitrage-free models of the term structure, corporate-debt pricing, convertible bonds, primary mortgage markets and securitization, immunization and portfolio insurance, valuation of futures and options on bonds, embedded options, and interest rate risk management. Prerequisite: For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2005-06 or before: - BUSI0016/FINA1002 Introduction to finance and BUSI0069/FINA0301 Derivatives securities For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2006-07 or after: - FINA1003 Corporate finance and FINA0301 Derivatives securities Mutually exclusive course: BUSI0056 Fixed income securities FINA0805. Real estate finance (6 credits) An introduction to real estate economics, mortgage market, real estate auctions in Hong Kong, presale market in Hong Kong, pricing of land and residential/commercial properties, mortgage-backed securities and mortgage company. FINA1001. Financial statement analysis (6 credits) This course covers the basic issues and principles of fundamental analysis, which deals with the valuation of a firm's equity shares and debt by using the information of financial statements. The objective of this course is to enable students to understand the key financial statements, important elements of financial statement analysis, and the application of financial statement analysis to forecasting and valuation analysis. Prerequisite: BUSI1002 Introduction to Accounting 200 FINA3806. Risk management (6 credits) This course introduces students to the techniques for corporate financial risk management. Topics include identification and measurement of financial risk, risk management with different financial instruments, such as forwards, futures, options, and other innovations, and some cases studies about applications of risk management. Prerequisite: For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2005-06 or before: - FINA0302 Corporate finance/Theories of corporate finance; and FINA2802 Investments/Investments and portfolio analysis For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2006-07 or after: - FINA0301 Derivative securities and FINA2802 Investments and portfolio analysis FINA3807. Special topics in finance (6 credits) This course covers current developments in finance. Possible topics include security trading and market making, venture analysis, financial contracting, investment strategies for local markets and other current issues in finance. The exact topic to be offered will be determined by the lecturer(s). Prerequisite: For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2005-06 or before: - FINA0302 Corporate finance/Theories of corporate finance; and FINA2802 Investments/Investments and portfolio analysis For students admitted to 1st year of study in 2006-07 or after: - FINA0301 Derivative securities and FINA2802 Investments and portfolio analysis YEAR THREE ELECTIVES (FINANCE COURSES) FINA3601. Reading course (6 credits) The course consists of supervised reading and written work. Candidates may specialize in one topic under the supervision of faculty members of the School of Economics and Finance. Candidates must submit the title of their project within the first two weeks of the semester for approval by the Director of the School of Economics and Finance. An original project paper is required in lieu of a written paper in the Examination. The project paper must be completed and presented not later than the first day of the assessment period for that semester. Candidates shall submit a statement that the project paper represents their own work (or in case of joint work, a statement countersigned by their co-worker(s), which shows the degree of their work) undertaken after the registration in the course. FINA3602. Dissertation (12 credits) Candidates may write a dissertation under the supervision of faculty members of the School of Economics and Finance. A satisfactory dissertation may be offered in lieu of two written papers in the Examination. Candidates must submit the title and an outline of their dissertation for approval by the Director of the School of Economics and Finance not later than December 1 of the final year of the curriculum, and the dissertationshall be completed and presented not later than the first day of the assessment period for the second semester (Note: The course extends over two semesters. Candidates must enroll in the first semester). Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above at the time of enrolment Remarks: Open only to BFin/BEcon&Fin students and students major in Finance. 201 LANGUAGE COURSES OFFERED TO FBE STUDENTS CBBA0001. Practical Chinese language course for business, economics and finance students (3 credits) This course will cover the following topics: (1) practical Chinese writing skills (2) Chinese characters (3) letter-writing (4) office documents (5) Chinese for special purposes (6) presentation and communication techniques and (7) information technology in Chinese. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. Remarks: Only available to BBA/BBA(Acc&Fin)/BBA(IS)/BEcon/BFin/BEcon&Fin students. CBBL0001. Practical Chinese language course for BBA(Law) students (3 credits) This course will cover the following topics: (1) practical Chinese writing skills (2) Chinese characters (3) letter-writing (4) office documents (5) Chinese for special purposes (6) presentation and communication techniques and (7) information technology in Chinese. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. Remarks: Only available to BBA(Law) students. ECEN1504. Professional and technical communication for Computer Science (3 credits) The course is designed to enable computer science and information systems majors to acquire professional and technical communication skills. The focus is on the understanding and using professional and technical language. Topics include: producing and asking questions to elicit information; conducting effective interviews; organizing and analyzing information; writing effective technical reports with a focus on coherence and cohesion; and increasing technical vocabulary. Students are required to design and conduct authentic oral interviews and, produce written technical reports and vocabulary journals. Remarks: Only available to BBA(IS) students. ECEN1602. Writing solutions to legal problems (3 credits) The course follows on from language input into the Legal Research and Writing I course in Year 1, Sem. 1. Writing solutions to legal problems dovetails closely with a substantive law course (Tort), allowing students to apply and articulate their knowledge of tort law as they frame a written response to the kinds of legal issues typically found in tutorial and examination questions. The focus is on the discourse structure of legal arguments, with attention paid to control of the grammar, vocabulary and stylistic features typical of problem solutions. Students receive substantial individual feedback on 3 problem cycles, featuring revisions of each answer. Assessment is wholly by coursework, including 2 extended pieces of writing under examination conditions at the end of the course. Remarks: Only available to BBA(Law) students. ECEN1904. English for academic communication for economics and finance students (3 credits) The course prepares students to respond effectively to the communicative demands of academic study in English. Through text-based activities in class and assigned work related to language and disciplinary issues, the course develops abilities to analyse and evaluate extended texts, and to produce clear and coherent spoken and written discourses. Particular emphasis is given to the use of source material: how to cite and refer to material, and how to make use of and attribute ideas without copying. Stress is also put on acquiring an academic vocabulary, oral presentation skills, plus careful revision and editing of essays to ensure that lexical and grammatical choices are appropriate. 202 Assessment: 100% coursework. Remarks: Only available to students from the School of Economics and Finance. ECEN1906. English for academic communication for business students (3 credits) The course prepares students to respond effectively to the demands of academic study in English. Through text-based activities in class and assigned work related to language and disciplinary issues, the course develops language abilities in a number of areas. Stress is laid upon developing an adequate academic vocabulary, and strategies to achieve this are taught. Particular emphasis is also given to the use of source material: how to cite and refer to material, and how to make use of and attribute ideas without copying. For oral work, extemporaneous delivery is practiced, without the need to rely on scripts. Pronunciation and grammatical difficulties are addressed as they occur. Assessment is wholly by coursework. Remarks: Only available to students from the School of Business. ECEN1907. Business communication (3 credits) This course prepares students to communicate effectively both at university and in anticipation of work situations which entail the use of English. A major project involves investigation of real business activity in Hong Kong and compiling a written report and a group presentation based on interview data. Through a series of simulation activities, the course also provides opportunities for students to practise business meeting skills. There is also emphasis on identification and understanding of idiomatic language, both in informal business situations and in more formal written and spoken texts. Assessment is wholly by coursework. Remarks: Only available to BBA/BBA(Acc&Fin)/BBA(IS) students. ECEN1908. English for Academic Communication for BBA (Law) (3 credits) The course aims to assist students with the demands of academic study in their dual discipline areas. Reading and writing skills are reviewed through diagnostic in-class activities, and independent study strategies and resources to counter any weaknesses identified will be promoted. The importance of suitable attribution of source material and the avoidance of plagiarism will be stressed. Speaking and listening skills will also be reviewed with an emphasis on extemporaneous rather than scripted delivery. Complex sentence structure will be studied to facilitate understanding of the kind of language met with in ordinances and other legal documents. The importance of vocabulary development will be stressed, and strategies for learning and dealing with new words will be addressed. Assessment - coursework 100%. Remarks: Only available to BBA(Law) students. ECEN1909. English for International Business and Global Management (3 credits) The course aims at raising students' awareness of issues in cross-cultural communication in international business. It prepares students to communicate effectively in a variety of cross-cultural business encounters. Topics to be covered include cultural differences in written and spoken genres, varieties of English and idiomatic English. Assessment - coursework 100%. Remarks: Only available to BBA(IBGM) students. 203 ECEN2905. English for professional communication for economics and finance students (3 credits) The course prepares students to communicate effectively and accurately and prepare themselves for workplace situations which entail the use of English. It requires students to investigate an issue relevant to their studies, improve their interview and presentation skills, and write a variety of professional documents. Assessment: 100% coursework. Remarks: Only available to students from the School of Economics and Finance. BUSI0081. Advanced business communication skills (6 credits) This course focuses on building on the current strengths and sharpening the skills second year students have acquired in the first year course Business Communication. The course aims at helping students develop their business communication skills for a variety of workplace situations. In addition to learning the principles and skills, students are expected to identify and make effective use of in-class and out-of-class practice opportunities. Remarks: Only available to BBA/BBA(Acc&Fin) students. OR ECEN2908. Advanced business communication skills (6 credits) This course focuses on building on the current strengths and sharpening the skills second year students have acquired in the first year course Business Communication. The course aims at helping students develop their business communication skills for a variety of workplace situations. In addition to learning the principles and skills, students are expected to identify and make effective use of in-class and out-of-class practice opportunities. Remarks: Only available to BBA/BBA(Acc&Fin) students. 204 FACULTY OF EDUCATION BSIM0001. Information management foundations (6 credits) This course introduces the literature of librarianship and information management and to provide an overview of the historical, current, and potential roles of libraries and information agencies. Approaches to needs analysis will be explored. BSIM0002. Information literacy (3 credits) This course provides a framework for an examination of information literacy issues. The central concerns are the nature of information, the nature of the autonomous learner and user needs, enquiry based learning, and information seeking behaviour. BSIM0003. Information policy (6 credits) The course examines the need for information policy at the macro and micro levels. Emphasis is given to the technological, political and ethical issues about information policy in the information management contexts. Topics include the role of the government in production and dissemination of information, the tension between privacy and freedom of access to information, and issues of potential conflicts in values and priorities in information policy. Models of policy development will also be examined. BSIM0004. Information retrieval (6 credits) This course investigates information retrieval principles, techniques and strategies from electronic information sources. It evaluates commercial and Internet databases and search engines. Data analysis, end-user products and services will also be explored. BSIM0005. Information society issues (6 credits) The course examines entrenched and emerging technological, political, economic, social, legal and ethical issues in the information based global society. Specific topics include intellectual property rights and copyright, information rich and poor, information and culture, technology and culture, societal needs and demands of information, and sociology of knowledge. BSIM0006. Knowledge management (6 credits) This course provides an introduction to KM theory, issues and developments. Human elements relating to organizational culture and learning are the focus for examining models for knowledge creation, taxonomies and sharing. Change management, communities of practice and decision-making are explored. Technical elements relating to electronic tools and platforms such as groupware, document management, intranets, customer relationship management and the use of information and communication technologies will be examined. BSIM0007. Metadata (6 credits) 205 This course will examine metadata schemas and standards in the digital environment with emphasis on the development and implementation of metadata and its technological applications used in libraries and information centers to create machine understandable metadata. XML, with its ability to define formal structure and semantic definitions for metadata and models, will be introduced. BSIM0008. Networks and telecommunications (6 credits) This course aims to cover basic computer networks concepts and telecommunications applications. Topics include network planning, implementation, management and security as well as their application in organizations. Network configuration issues and telecommunications applications are also examined. BSIM0009. Database systems and information warehousing (6 credits) This course aims to introduce fundamental concepts of database management systems, with an emphasis on the relational database model and applications in information agencies. Topics include the motivation of database systems, conceptual and implementation data models, data modeling, principles of database design, data definition and manipulation languages. This course also introduces the concepts of information warehousing and data mining in the context of organizations and information management. BSIM0010. Digital libraries: principles and applications (6 credits) This course focuses on research and development issues in digital libraries; access strategies and interfaces; metadata and interoperability; economic and social policies and management and evaluation. BSIM0011. Project management (6 credits) This course introduces the project life cycle and the techniques and change management aspects of managing and planning successful projects in organizations. Conceptual foundations are the focus so students can use project management software effectively. BSIM0012. Records management (6 credits) This course explores the philosophy of records management and presents the basic techniques and standards for managing records. It describes the application of these techniques both to existing situations and to the creation of new records management programs. The course investigates methods for improving active, inactive and permanent records management, and the retention and disposal of records. BSIM0013. Web services & digital publishing (6 credits) This course focuses on the theories and techniques in using the Internet as a medium for information, research, education, communication, and multimedia resources. This course also introduces the basic standards and design that enable web services and digital publishing. 206 BSIM0014. User-based systems analysis (6 credits) This subject introduces students to the evaluation and design of information systems in the context of information agencies. Technologies of networking and databases will be examined with an emphasis on usability and internal and external human factors. Mapping technology planning to organizational functions and goals as well as human-computer interactions will be discussed. BSIM0015. Reading and understanding research in information management (3 credits) This course focuses on introducing and framing the notion of reading and understanding research in information management. Basic concepts of various research methods are also introduced. BSIM0016. Social and organizational issues of information management (6 credits) This subject introduces the relationship between information and information systems, technology, practices, and artifacts on how people organize their work, interact, and understand experience. Individual, group, organizational, and social issues in information production and use as well as information systems design and management are discussed. BSIM4999. Project (6 credits) Candidates are required to complete a project on an approved topic in their final year of study. EDUC1001 Language and learning (6 credits) This course considers the nature, organization and functioning of language itself, as our primary meaning-making resource. It covers language development in children, the role of language in learning, at home and in school, the challenges of mastering literacy, the linguistic component in educational knowledge, language across the curriculum, the language and genres of specific school subjects, and academic genres at tertiary level and beyond. EDUC1002 Hong Kong education: systemic features and social approaches * (6 credits) After studying the course, students will be able to identify, understand and analyse major features underlying the Hong Kong educational system, their trends of development and the social factors contributing to the formation of these systemic features. * This course is a prerequisite for teaching methods courses: EDUC8301, EDUC8302 and EDUC8303. EDUC2001 Psychology of teaching and learning * (6 credits) This course explores a broad range of issues that affect teaching and learning. It provides opportunities for reflecting on and understanding educational practice. Emphasis will be given to the impact of the interplay between personological characteristics and learning environments upon both teaching effectiveness and learning outcome. Upon completing this course, learners will achieve an enhanced ability to create learning environments that are more conducive to student learning and development. * This course is a prerequisite for teaching methods courses: EDUC8301, EDUC8302 and EDUC8303. 207 EDUC3001 Children with learning difficulties (3 credits) This course considers the definition, the characteristics and the different strategies of helping children with learning difficulties. It addresses the origins of learning difficulties in children, in schools and in systems; referral procedures and means of identifying children with special needs; and the provision of services for these children. EDUC3005 Guidance and counselling (3 credits) This course provides an introduction to guidance and counselling. It examines the rationale underlying the provision of guidance and counselling services in schools. It is also offered as an introduction to the knowledge and skills that are basic to counselling and guidance. EDUC4002 Curriculum concepts and issues (3 credits) This course examines the key elements or components of school curricula and the critical questions which need to be asked about those components. The influence of social, political and economic factors on the design and implementation of the curriculum are also analysed. EDUC4003 Concepts and values in education (3 credits) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to conceptual understanding of the nature and process of education as well as its values in society. Topics concerning the nature of education include definitions of education, and aims of education. Topics concerning the values of education in society include the justification of education, educational values, and human nature and potential. Topics concerning the process of education include education and personal relationships, teaching and learning, freedom and authority, and punishment and discipline. Students are asked to discuss these issues in the context of Hong Kong education. EDUC8001 Understanding and guiding the development of young children (6 credits) This course will consider theoretical approaches to understanding young children and will provide an overview of physical, cognitive and social/emotional development at the infant, toddler, preschool and early primary levels. It will critically evaluate the different models of teaching, consider various methods of guiding young children's behaviour, and focus on how to create and maintain a positive learning environment. The significance and effects of play in the early childhood curriculum and ways of facilitating play will be emphasized. Methods of fostering social competence, self-esteem and self-control in the preschool environment will also be addressed. Prerequisite: PSYC0009 (URL: http://www.hku.hk/education/courses/course-ugdyc.htm) EDUC8002 Planning, managing and assessing services for young children (6 credits) This course will first consider how theoretical approaches have shaped early childhood education and contemporary curriculum models. It will then address planning and implementing the curriculum/programme. Finally, it will consider assessment and evaluation in early childhood programmes. This part will address ways of assessing, recording and reporting children's progress, and 208 ways of evaluating the different components of early childhood programmes such as the theoretical foundations, goals, physical environment, curriculum, teaching practices, social interaction and parental involvement. Prerequisite: PSYC0009 (URL: http://www.hku.hk/education/courses/course-pmasyc.htm) EDUC8301 Teaching science in schools (6 credits) This course aims to help students to acquire and develop expertise as science teachers. It focuses on how best to promote and organize learning in schools. Prerequisite: EDUC1002 and EDUC2001 EDUC8302 Teaching computer and information technology in schools (6 credits) This course aims to help students to develop understanding about the teaching of computer studies and information technology subjects in schools. It focuses on the evolution of the curricula concerned, learning theories that would help the teaching of such subjects, and critical awareness about the power and problems of the technology. Prerequisite: EDUC1002 and EDUC2001 EDUC8303 Teaching mathematics in schools (6 credits) This course aims to help students to reflect upon the aims and objectives of mathematics teaching, familiarize themselves with the local school mathematics curriculum, broaden their awareness of mathematics as a subject, gain an understanding of how school students learn mathematics, and be aware of the issues in school mathematics. Prerequisite: EDUC1002 and EDUC2001 EDUC8304 Project/Individual study (6 credits) Students may undertake curriculum or school programme related work to develop learning resources or co-curricular programmes in an area of interest which may develop from their educational studies or teaching methods courses. Such a project could extend or be different from assignments written for specific courses. 209 FACULTY OF ENGINEERING Department of Computer Science Assessment of each course will be based on a three-hour written examination and in-course assessment in a ratio as indicated below. CSIS1117. Computer programming I (6 credits) The goal of this course is for students to learn the general principles of programming, including how to design, implement, document, test, and debug programs. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination CSIS1118. Mathematical foundations of computer science (6 credits) Logic, sets, and functions; mathematical reasoning; counting techniques; relations; graphs; trees; modelling computation. CSIS1119. Introduction to data structures and algorithms (6 credits) Arrays, linked lists, trees and graphs; stacks and queues; symbol tables; priority queues, balanced trees; sorting algorithms; complexity analysis. Assessment: 40% coursework; 60% examination Prerequisite: CSIS1117 or ELEC1501 Co-requisite: CSIS1122 CSIS1120. Machine organization and assembly language programming (6 credits) Fundamentals of computer organization and machine architecture; number, character and instruction representations; addressing modes; assembly language programming including stack manipulation and subroutine linkage; basic logic design and integrated devices; the central processing unit and its control; concepts of microprogramming, data flow and control flow; I/O devices and their controllers, interrupts and memory organization; computer arithmetic. Co-requisite: CSIS1117 or ELEC1501 CSIS1122. Computer programming II (6 credits) [for intake of 2006 and after] This is the second programming course following the CSIS1117. The goal of this course is to strengthen students' programming skills, in particular, on implementing basic data structures and algorithms. Students will also learn various tools for developing programs in the UNIX/Linux environment. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Prerequisite: CSIS1117 or ELEC1501 CSIS0230. Principles of operating systems (6 credits) Operating system structures, process and thread, CPU scheduling, process synchronization, deadlocks, memory management, file systems, I/O systems and device driver, mass-storage structure and disk scheduling, network structure, distributed systems, case studies. Prerequisites: CSIS1119; and CSIS1120 or ELEC1401 or ELEC1613 210 CSIS0234. Computer and communication networks (6 credits) Network structure and architecture; reference models; stop and wait protocol; sliding window protocols; character and bit oriented protocols; virtual circuits and datagrams; routing; flow control; congestion control; local area networks; issues and principles of network interconnection; transport protocols and application layer; and examples of network protocols. Prerequisite: CSIS1120 or ELEC1401 or ELEC1613 CSIS0250. Design and analysis of algorithms (6 credits) The course studies various algorithm design techniques, such as divide and conquer, and dynamic programming. These techniques are applied to design highly non-trivial algorithms from various areas of computer science. Topics include: advanced data structures; graph algorithms; searching algorithms; geometric algorithms; overview of NP-complete problems. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Pre/Co-requisite: CSIS1119 or ELEC1501 CSIS0259. Principles of programming languages (6 credits) [for intake of 2005] Syntax and semantics specification; data types; data control and memory management; expressions, precedence and associativity of operators; control structures; comparative study of existing programming languages; advanced topics such as polymorphism, programming paradigms, exception handling and concurrency. Prerequisites: CSIS1119; and CSIS1120 or ELEC1401 or ELEC1613 CSIS0270. Artificial intelligence (6 credits) This is an introduction course on the subject of artificial intelligence. Topics include: intelligent agents; search techniques for problem solving; knowledge representation; logical inference; reasoning under uncertainty; statistical models and machine learning. This course may not be taken with BUSI0088. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Prerequisite: CSIS1119 or CSIS1122 CSIS0271. Computer graphics (6 credits) Overview of graphics hardware, basic drawing algorithms, 2-D transformations, windowing and clipping, interactive input devices, curves and surfaces, 3-D transformations and viewing, hidden-surface and hidden-line removal, shading and colour models, modelling, illumination models, image synthesis, computer animation. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Prerequisite: CSIS1119 or CSIS1122 CSIS0278. Introduction to database management systems (6 credits) This course studies the principles, design, administration, and implementation of database management systems. Topics include: entity-relationship model, relational model, relational algebra and calculus, database design and normalization, database query languages, indexing schemes, integrity, concurrency control, and query processing. This course may not be taken with BUSI0052. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Prerequisite: CSIS1119 or ELEC1501 211 CSIS0293. Introduction to theory of computation (6 credits) This course focuses on three traditional areas of the theory of computation: automata, computability and complexity. Topics include finite state automata and regular languages; pushdown automata and context free languages; Turing machines and random access machines; time complexity; space complexity; intractable problems; reduction and completeness; relationship among complexity classes; approximation algorithms and nonapproximability. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Prerequisite: CSIS1119 CSIS0297. Introduction to software engineering (6 credits) This course introduces the fundamental principles and methodologies of software engineering. It covers the software process and methods and tools employed in the development of modern systems. The use of CASE tools and the UML are emphasized. The course includes a team-based project in which students apply their new knowledge to a full development lifecycle, including maintenance. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Prerequisite: CSIS1117 or CSIS0396 or ELEC1501 (for intake of 2005 or before) CSIS1122 (for intake of 2006 and after) CSIS0311. Legal aspects of computing (6 credits) To introduce students to the laws affecting computing and the legal issues arising from the technology. Contents include: the legal system of Hong Kong; copyright protection for computer programs and databases; intellectual property issues on the Internet; patent protection for computer-related inventions; computer-related crime. This course may not be taken with LLAW3065. Assessment: 30% coursework; 70% examination CSIS0315. Multimedia computing and applications (6 credits) This course introduces various aspects of the interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary field of multimedia computing. Current developments of technologies and techniques in multimedia will also be covered. Applications of multimedia techniques are also highlighted through a media production course project. Major topics include: what are media, audio, acoustics and psychoacoustics, MIDI, basic compression techniques, video compression techniques, standards, and current multimedia technologies. This course may not be taken with BUSI0068. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Prerequisite: CSIS1119 CSIS0317. Computer vision (6 credits) This course introduces the principles, mathematical models and applications of computer vision. Topics include: image processing techniques, feature extraction techniques, imaging models and camera calibration techniques, stereo vision, and motion analysis. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Prerequisite: CSIS1119 or ELEC1501 CSIS0320. Electronic commerce technology (6 credits) This course aims to help students to understand the technical and managerial challenges they will face as electronic commerce becomes a new locus of economics activities. Topics include Internet and 212 WWW technology, information security technologies, public-key crypto-systems, public-key infrastructure, electronic payment systems, and electronic commerce activities in different sectors. Assessment: 40% coursework; 60% examination Prerequisite: CSIS0278 CSIS0322. Internet and the World Wide Web (6 credits) Introduction and history; networks, internetworking, and network protocols; TCP/IP and related protocols; client-server model and programming; distributed applications; Domain Name System; Internet applications: TELNET, mail, FTP, etc.; Internet security; intranet and extranet; virtual private networks; World Wide Web; Web addressing; HTTP; HTML, XML, style sheets, etc.; programming the Web: CGI, Java, JavaScript, etc.; Web servers; Web security; Web searching; push technology; other topics of current interest. This course may not be taken with BUSI0063. Assessment: 40% coursework; 60% examination Prerequisite: CSIS1117 or ELEC1501 CSIS0396. Object-oriented programming and Java (6 credits) Introduction to object-oriented programming; abstract data types and classes; inheritance and polymorphism; object-oriented program design; Java language and its program development environment; user interfaces and GUI programming; collection class and iteration protocol; program documentation.Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Pre-requisite: CSIS1117 or ELEC1501 CSIS0405. Professionalism and ethics (3 credits) This course exposes students to issues of professionalism in computing. Topics included professional societies and ethics, professional competency and life-long learning, methods and tools of analysis, risks and liabilities of computer-based systems, intellectual property and software law, information security and privacy, and the social impacts of computing. CSIS0521. Concepts and tools for software development (6 credit-units) This course will introduce the following concepts and techniques for software development: key steps in a software development life cycle; software development methodologies; components of a web-based software tools; installation of servers (e.g. web server, database server etc.); web programming (e.g. PhP, mySQL); key issues in human-user interface; data visualization (e.g. visualization on the web with SVG). Examples will be drawn from practical cases such as bioinformatics software tools development. The emphasis is on how to formulate the computational problem based on the user requirements and the related practical concerns for the development of the software. This course is open to non-Engineering students only. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination Pre-requisite: CSIS1117 CSIS0801. Final year project (12 credits) Student individuals or groups, during the final year of their studies, undertake full end-to-end development of a substantial project, taking it from initial concept through to final delivery. Topics range from applied software development to assignments on basic research. In case of a team project, significant contribution is required from each member and students are assessed individually, such that each student is given a separate project title. Strict standards of quality will be enforced throughout the project development. 213 CSIS0803. System integration project (6 credits) This is a team project involving development and integration of software components. The objective is to put the concepts and theories covered in the core courses into practice. The output will be a distributed software system based on well-defined requirements. Software tools will be used and system programming is a compulsory part of the project. CSIS1410. Industrial training (3 credits) Industrial Training requires students to spend a minimum of six weeks employed, full-time, as IT interns or trainees. During this period, they are engaged in work of direct relevance to their programme of study. CSIS1410 provides students with practical, real-world experience and represents a valuable complement to their academic training. CSIS1411. Workshop training (3 credits) This is a compulsory course taken after completing the first year of studies. Workshop Training is structured as a series of modules in which students gain direct, hands-on experience of various industry-standard software tools and technologies. As well as providing an exposure to current "tools of the trade", the course also emphasizes the application of engineering principles to the development and use of software systems. CSIS1421. Engineering mathematics (6 credits) Linear algebra, probability and statistics, calculus, and ordinary differential equations. Other CSIS Courses Students may apply to enrol in other CSIS courses not listed above, subject to the approval of the Head of the Department of Computer Science. - 214 - FACULTY OF LAW Department of Law LLAW1001. and LLAW1002. Law of contract I and II (12 credits) The function of contract; formation of a valid contract; offer and acceptance; capacity; illegality; interpretation of the terms of a contract; misinterpretation; mistake; duress and undue influence; privity; performance; discharge and breach; quasi-contract; remedies; principles of agency. LLAW1005. and LLAW1006. Law of tort I and II (12 credits) General principles of liability, negligence, defences to negligence, vicarious liability, loss distribution, fatal accidents, duty of care towards employees, statutory compensation for employees, breach of statutory duty, occupiers' liability, nuisance, Rylands v. Fletcher, trespass to person, trespass to property, other intentional torts to person and property, defences to trespass, defamation, other interests protected by the law of tort, remedies (damages and injunction). LLAW1008 The legal system (6 credits) An overview of major legal systems in the world (common law, civil law, socialist law, religious law), including a brief overview on a comparison between the common law system and the PRC legal system; the ideology of the common law system and the rule of law, justice and separation of powers; development of the Hong Kong legal system; classification of law, sources of Hong Kong law; law making process; Hong Kong court system; doctrine of stare decisis; access to justice and legal aid; legal profession and legal services; jury system; law reform; Government lawyers and organization of Government legal services; the language of the law; interface between the PRC legal system and the Hong Kong legal system LLAW1009 Law and society (6 credits) This course aims to capture the dynamics between law and society, namely, how law is shaped by social changes, perception and thought, and how society is moulded by legal rules and norms. Broad interdisciplinary knowledge and perspectives relevant to the study of the relationship between law and society will be discussed. Theoretical, empirical and policy considerations will be taken into account. General themes chosen to highlight the above dynamics will include the relationship between law and political power, law and economic development, law and history, law and family, and law and social life. Specific topics covered may vary from year to year and may include the following: the rule of law and the liberal constitutional state; law and economic development in the age of globalisation; the anthropology of law; law and culture; law and morality; the historical and philosophical foundations of western and Chinese law; current socio-legal issues in Hong Kong. LLAW2001 Constitutional Law (6 credits) The nature and characteristics of constitutions; constitutional doctrines : constitutionalism, the rule of law, the separation of powers, judicial review, autonomy, democracy, and human rights protection; the resumption of sovereignty and the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, its framework and content, interpretation and amendment; international dimension and external affairs; the Constitution of the People's Republic of China and their inter-relationship; comparison of the constitution of Hong Kong with the territory's colonial constitution and constitutions in other parts of the world; the relationship between Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and the Central Government of the People's Republic of China; the executive, legislative and judicial organs of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and their inter-relationships; human rights protection in - 215 - Hong Kong; the prospect of constitutionalism in Hong Kong; judicial review of administrative action; control of law-making by delegates; the ombudsman; administrative appeals. LLAW2003. Criminal law I (6 credits) This course introduces students to the principles of Hong Kong criminal law and liability. Topics include the nature and classification of crime, elements of criminal procedure in Hong Kong, the burden of proof and the impact of constitutional human rights, and the general principles of criminal responsibility, including criminal defences and degrees of participation. Offences considered will include homicide and theft. [Co-requisite: LLAW2004 Criminal law II] LLAW2004. Criminal law II (6 credits) This course examines further aspects of criminal law and liability in Hong Kong, including additional criminal defences and inchoate liability. It will examine the application of the general principles of criminal responsibility in selected criminal offence areas, including homicide, assaults, sexual offences, and theft and deception. Where possible, students will be encouraged to consider alternative approaches to the principles of liability, and to develop social policy analysis skills. [Prerequisite: LLAW 2003 Criminal law I] LLAW2009. Introduction to Chinese law (6 credits) A general overview of the legal system and the basic principles of law in force in mainland China today. Topics to be covered include the historical background to the contemporary Chinese legal system; constitutional law; sources of law; the law-making institutions and processes; the courts, procuratorates and legal profession; basic principles of civil and criminal procedure and administrative litigation; basic principles of civil, commercial, administrative and criminal law; and the impact of globalisation on Chinese legal developments. LLAW 1010 Legal research and writing I (3 credits) Case reading: distinguishing law/fact; learning the structure and language ofcommon law judgments; identifying relevant facts; identifying and defining legal issues, ratios, arguments, reasoning with precision; learning the ways in which judges in one case treat the judgments in earlier cases; precedent in action. Basic legal writing skills using short weekly marked up and graded writing assignments in the format of case briefs, letters to clients, closed internal memoranda. Emphasis will be placed upon correct use of general English and appropriate legal terminology, clarity of expression and logical, effective organisation of ideas and arguments. Learning skills: pre-class preparation; in class exercises, participation in class discussions using group and Socratic methods. LLAW 1011 Legal research and writing II (3 credits) All about legislation: the anatomy of an ordinance; the life cycle of an ordinance; the nature and use of the revised and loose-left editions of the Laws of Hong Kong and the Legal Supplements to the Gazette; the structure of the English Statute Book, the nature of subordinate legislation; reading ordinances; statutory interpretation in common law jurisdictions. Basic legal writing skills using short, weekly marked up and graded writing assignments involving precise identification and resolution of statutory interpretation problems. - 216 - Learning skills; pre-class preparation, in class presentation on part of the life cycle of an ordinance, participation in very small group discussions with systematic reporting and feedback. LLAW 1012 Legal research and writing III (3 credits) Library research involving identifying and physically locating appropriate Hong Kong and English case law and statutory provisions using (i) paper and (ii) electronic sources with emphasis upon thoroughness, efficiency and being as up to date as practically possible; basic research tools for Canada and Australia; use of legal encyclopedias, especially Halsburys, and digests such as Current Law and Hong Kong's own materials; a first introduction to legal journals. Students will be expected to do a number of ungraded, narrowly focused research assignments, designed to assist students in familiarizing themselves with legal research tools and methods. They will then be expected to complete a research plan, a research file, an office memo, a barrister's skeleton, oral argument and final judgment all based on an assigned research request (a different research request set by each tutor). LLAW 2012 Commercial law (6 credits) This course will introduce the fundamental principles of commercial law through the integration of legal issues associated with contracts, personal property, security and finance and equity in the context of commercial transactions. It focuses on the types of commercial transactions, the legal relations between parties thereto, issues arising from interrelated financial transactions, and credit and security. It covers introduction to personal property, rights in rem and rights in personam, bailment; commercial transactions (sale of goods and services, statutory control on unconscionable terms; implied terms and exemption/limitation clauses; transfer of title, nemo dat); gift; negotiable instruments, assignment of choses in action and security interests (retention of title, lien, pledges, mortgages, fixed and floating charges, guarantees); protection of interests in property and remedies (conversion, detinue, trespass, unjust enrichment, set-off); introduction to bankruptcy and corporate insolvency; settlement of commercial disputes. LLAW2013 and LLAW2014 Land law I and II (12 credits) Introduction: concept of a proprietary interest; what is property law; classification of property; the nature of a trust. Ownership, title and possession: legal ownership; title; leasehold estates in Hong Kong; ownership and possession; tenure and estates; equitable interests; possession-recovery and protection of possession; adverse possession and possessory title. Priority: doctrine of notice; statutory intervention (e.g. land registration); subrogation. Creation and transfer of proprietary interests in land: creation; assignment; intervention of equity (e.g. Walsh v Lonsdale, part performance, estoppel, constructive and resulting trusts). Future interests: remainders and reversions: trusts for sale; vested and contingent interest; rules against inalienability. Concurrent interests: joint tenancy and tenancy in common; ownership in multi-storey buildings; severance; termination. Leases: nature of leases; relationship of landlord and tenant; termination; statutory intervention. Easements: nature; creation and determination. Licences: revocability; enforceability. Covenants: between landlord and tenant; between adjoining and co-owners; role in use and management of land. Security interests: mortgages; charges; pledges; liens. Land registration and priorities. - 217 - LLAW 2015 Legal research and writing IV (3 credits) Using materials from a range of substantive law courses, students will be required to complete a number of written assignments such as a draft legal brief and a revised version, clauses for or answering problem questions in relation to simple hire purchase, car parking, employment or tenancy agreements; a simple set of pleadings, an essay critically commenting on a legal journal article. LLAW 2016 Legal research and writing V (3 credits) Students will be required to complete two supervised assignments, each involving the preparation of a research plan, working bibliography (if appropriate), full draft and final polished product. One assignment, to be completed in the first semester, will required research in an area of private law, probably in the form of an open memorandum. The other assignment will require research in an area of public or comparative law with the additional requirement of a presentation of the paper to a seminar of peers as a work in progress. The second assignment and presentation will be completed in the second semester. LLAW3001. Introduction to legal theory (6 credits) This course encourages critical reflections on the nature of law, the central issues of jurisprudence and the concepts and techniques used in the operation of legal systems. Topics to be covered may include some of the following: the relationship between law and morality; natural law; legal positivism; Ronald Dworkin's jurisprudence; utilitarianism and economic analysis of law; justice; liberty; rights; the Rule of Law; punishment; adjudication and legal reasoning; legal realism; sociological jurisprudence; critical legal studies; feminist jurisprudence; postmodern jurisprudence. LLAW3007 Alternative Dispute Resolution (6 credits) This course will examine the traditional methods of dispute resolution such as judicial adjudication, and consider alternative dispute resolution from both a Hong Kong and an Asian perspective. This course is composed of two main parts: (a) an introduction to traditional methods of dispute resolution and a critique of their advantages and disadvantages; and (b) an examination of alternative dispute resolution methods, which will cover the following: (i) the origin and development of the alternative dispute resolution movement, and (ii) an in-depth study of the following methods: confidential private listening; negotiation, mediation and conciliation; arbitration; good offices/ombudsman; minitrials/summary jury trails; private courts, dispute resolution centres and online webbased ADR schemes. These methods of alternative dispute resolution will be examined by considering their present and potential application in Hong Kong and other parts of Asia, in such areas as: administrative complaints, commercial and construction disputes (both domestic and international), labour relations, landlord and tenant disputes and matrimonial disputes. Students will also engage in role playing exercises in simulated negotiation, mediation and arbitration with video taped assessment. LLAW3009 Banking law (6 credits) Introduction: history of banking; outline of banking organization, control and regulation of financial institutions in Hong Kong; distinction drawn between banks and other deposit-taking institutions. Banker-customer relationship: nature of the relationship and its development; meaning of `customer' and types of accounts; banker's rights as against customer including appropriation of payment, lien and set-off; duties of banker including secrecy and payment of customers' cheques; implied duties of the customer; contractual attempts to modify such duties; supply of references; banker as adviser; - 218 - determination of relationship. Paper-based funds transfers: general principles in law relating to choses in action and their assignment; negotiable instruments especially cheques; money paid by mistake; forgery; direct debits; credit transfers. Electronic funds transfers and other modern banking developments: nature and operation of various means of electronic funds transfers including consumer-related and non-consumer-related transfers; legal implications of such transfers; revocability and finality of payment instructions; standing orders; cheque cards; credit cards. LLAW3010. Business associations (6 credits) Outline of different types of business associations. Partnership: their nature and creation and the rights and duties of the partner inter se and vis-a-vis third parties. Registered companies: their development and nature; problems relating to incorporation; separate corporate personality; limited liability; memorandum and articles of association; ultra vires doctrine; an overview of membership, management and control. LLAW3015 Company Law (6 credits) Capital: the nature and types of capital; raising, maintenance and reduction of capital; shares: transfer and registration, purchase by a company and financial assistance for purchase of its own shares; dividends, distributable profits. Corporate borrowing: debentures, company charges, floating charges, registration, remedies of charge. The governance of a company: members, general meetings; directors, the position and duties of directors; board meetings; conflict of interest; majority rule, minority protection; external regulation, disclosure, notifications, annual return, audits, inspections and investigations. Corporate failure: reconstructions and schemes and windingup (overview). Listed companies: regulation; public issues; mergers, acquisitions and takeovers. LLAW3022. Human rights in Hong Kong (6 credits) History of enactment, the Bill of Rights Regime, ICCPR, implementation of human rights treaties, Basic Law, interpretation, scope of application, inter-citizen rights, locus standi, permissible limitations, derogation and reservation, enforcement and remedy. Study of selected rights, including civil and political rights, economic, social & cultural rights and people's rights. Topics covered include impact on civil and criminal process, right to a fair and public trial, arrest, search and seizure, torture and degrading treatment, liberty and security of person, freedom of association and assembly, freedom of expression, right to nationality, right to family, right to political participation, discrimination and equality, right to housing, social securities, education and environment. LLAW3034 Labour Law (6 credits) This course is intended to provide an introduction to the major issues in labour and employment law in Hong Kong. It is concerned with the law governing the workplace: the common law of the contract of employment, the statutory provisions regulating the contract of employment and governing the rights and obligations of workers and employers, workers' entitlements under legislation, workplace safely, the right to compensation for work-related injury, protection against discrimination, and collective rights such as the right to form trade unions, to bargain and to strike. International law, in the form of the International Labour Organisation conventions as well as the major UN conventions on human rights, and their interface with domestic law, will be considered. - 219 - LLAW3040 Medico-Legal Issues (6 credits) This course examine how the law regulates medical practice. Topics examined include consent to medical treatment, abortion, pre-natal injuries, death and withholding life sustaining treatment, euthanasia, organ transplant, confidentiality and access to medical records. LLAW3043 Principles of Family Law (6 credits) This course covers basic principles of Hong Kong family law and its historical development. It examines marriage formation, nullity and legal consequences of marriage. It covers protection of spouse and children from domestic violence. This course also covers judicial separation, divorce and ancillary relief. The law relating to children is also examined with emphasis on parental responsibility, child adoption and child protection from abuse and neglect. Also studied is the impact on family law of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and other international treaties binding on Hong Kong. LLAW3044 Public International Law (6 credits) Topics will include some of the following: introduction to the nature of international law and its historical development; sources of international law; the relationship between international and municipal law; the subjects of international law; the concept of sovereignty and state recognition; state jurisdiction; the acquisition and loss of territory; state responsibility; state succession; treaties and other international legal agreements; the pacific settlement of disputes; the use of force; international institutions; human rights. The above is intended merely as a guide to the general nature of the subject matter to be covered. Special reference will be made throughout to considerations which are particularly relevant in the Hong Kong and Southeast Asian contexts. LLAW3046 Child and the Law (6 credits) This course covers the law of parent and child with emphasis on the emerging concept of parental responsibility and the rights of the child. It examines the increasing importance of parentage as a status and the effect of Parent and Child Ordinance (1993) on the status of children in Hong Kong. Also examined here is the effect of divorce on children and the enforcement of child support obligation. The course also examines the importance of listening to children in family proceedings and the role of mediation in the settlement of family disputes over children. Also considered is the law of child adoption and protection from abuse and neglect. LLAW3047. The Hong Kong basic law (6 credits) The background to the Basic Law (the Joint Declaration and the process of drafting and agreeing on the Basic Law), basic Chinese and Western liberal constitutional concepts relevant to an understanding of the structure and orientation of the Basic Law, the relationship of the Basic Law to the Chinese Constitution, the relationship between the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and the Chinese central government, the institutional structure of the Hong Kong SAR, especially the relationship between the executive and the legislature, the concept and special aspects of 'one country, two systems' (e.g. the economic system preserved in the Basic Law), human rights, judicial review and constitutional litigation. - 220 - LLAW3057. International criminal law (6 credits) This course explores the rationale, origins, normative development, institutional mechanisms and role of international criminal law. To do this, we trace the roots of international criminal law in customary laws of war and early attempts to enforce rules prohibiting war crimes, before reviewing the operation of the Nuremberg and Tokyo International Military Tribunals that were established after the Second World War. We then take account of the Geneva Conventions, 1949, and the rise of international human rights law, focusing on the crimes of aggression, genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. We then delve into the law and practice of the ad hoc International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda and relate their establishment and operation to the emerging system of international criminal law, and the process under way to establish the International Criminal Court. Other problems of international crime, including terrorism, drug-trafficking, hostage-taking and hijacking, also will be considered against the backdrop of the domestic and international sociopolitical realities of our time. LLAW3058 International Mooting Competition (6 credits) Students who have been selected as members of the team to represent the University of Hong Kong in one of the international mooing competitions listed below (or any other mooting competition approved by the Faculty Board) are eligible to enrol in this course. The competitions are the William C Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot (takes place in Vienna), the International Environmental Law Moot Court Competition, the Telders International Human Rights Law Moot, the Cardozo International Intellectual Property Moot, and the Manfred Lachs Space Law Moot Competition. These competitions involve the preparation as members of a team of substantial written memorials, as well as participation in oral rounds. A member of the Faculty will act as supervisor for those enrolled in the course. Assessment for the course may include components for written work, oral advocacy, and a brief individual research paper. Remarks: With the Head's permission, it is possible to take this course on a noncredit earning basis. LLAW3059 Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition (6 credits) The Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition is an international mooting competition in the field of public international lw. Teams of up to five members prepare written memorials on a problem involving contemporary issues of international law, and participate in the Hong Kong regional mooting competition; the winner of the regional round is entitled to participate in the international rounds held in the United States. The deadline for the submission of the written briefs is normally early January; the oral rounds normally take place in February (Hong Kong) and late March/early April (international rounds). Eligibility for enrolment in the course is limited to those students who have been selected as members of the team to representthe University of Hong Kong. A member of the Faculty will act as supervisor for those enrolled in the course. Assessment for the course may include components for written work, oral advocacy, and a brief individual research paper. Remarks: With the Head's permission, it is possible to take this course on a noncredit earning basis. LLAW3062. Human Rights in China (6 credits) This course will examine the international and domestic dimensions of the protection of human rights in the People's Republic of China. It will examine the applicability of international human rights standards to the PRC, the stance of the PRC in relation to international national mechanisms for the protection of human rights, and the place of international standards in domestic law. The course will - 221 - consider the theoretical debates about the origin and contingency of human rights standards, questions of priorities in human rights, and the issue of rights in Chinese cultural contexts. It will also examine the extent of human rights protections available under the Chinese constitution and other laws, and will focus on selected issues, which may include the criminal justice system, freedom of expression, freedom of association, freedom of religion, labour rights, gender discrimination, and minorities/selfdetermination. The course will also examine the social and political forces that may contribute to the improvement of human rights in China. LLAW3069 Regulation of Financial Markets (6 credits) This foundation course addresses the nature and operation of financial markets and the role of regulation. Coverage, based on comparative analysis and international standards, will include major financial sectors (banking, securities, insurance), supporting legal and institutional structures, and current issues and trends. LLAW3071 Equality and Nondiscrimination (6 credits) This course is an LLB law elective and a designated research course (satisfying the research requirement for LLB students). This is an exciting time to study equality rights, as Hong Kong has only recently entered the field enacting the Sex Discrimination Ordinance and the Disability Discrimination Odinance in 1995. The government introduced a Race Discrimination Bill in December 2006 which is will be debated in the Legislative Council whie this course is running in the 2007 spring term. When drafting this legislation, the Hong Kong government borrowed heavily from other countries (primarily from Australia and the UK). In addition, Hong Kong courts often look to international and foreign jurisprudence when interpreting the antidiscrimination ordinances. This course, therefore, takes a comparative approach to understanding this area of law. The course introduces students to different concepts of equality, definitions of discrimination, the impact of efforts toredress discrimination through law and policy, and clashes between equality and other values. Course materials include: treaties and other international materials; legislation from Hong Kong and other jurisdictions; leading cases from Hong Kong and other jurisdictions; and academic commentary. Given the comparative approach of the course, it is not possible to study all grounds of discrimination in one semester. The teacher will distribute materials and lead discussions on three or four of the following grounds of discrimination: gender; race; disability; sexuality; transgender; age. The syllabus will also include one or two types of harassment (e.g. sexual harassment, racial harassment, or harassment on the ground of disability) and an introduction to the enforcement models for equality rights. Student research assignments and inclass presentations can address additional forms of discrimination and harassment, as well as current debates on concepts of equality and competing values. For example, students may wish to research potential conflicts between antidiscrimination laws and religious or cultural values; between affirmative action and "formal" concepts of equality; or between freedom of expression and laws prohibiting sexual and racial harassment. Given the limited amount of Hong Kong case law in this field, student research topics should normally take a comparative approach and should not be confined to Hong Kong law. LLAW3080 Governance and Law (6 credits) This course seeks to understand why the state regulates certain activities and behaviour in society, what different forms of regulation exist, when and what kind of legal regulation is deemed necessary, how legal regulation is enforced, and checks balances against abuse in enforcement. This course is jointly taught by staff from the Department of Politics and Public Administration and the Department of Law. The main objective of the course is to explore the interface between the study of Politics and Law in understanding governance. Relevant case studies will be included for illustration and discussion. To take this course, student must have successfully completed POLI1002 Fundamentals - 222 - of Public Administration and LLAW3093 Administrative Law. Students are allowed to take either POLI0064 or LLAW3080 to fulfill the respective programme requirements for the Department of Politics and Public Administration or the Department of Law. LLAW3090. Legal aspects of white collar crime (6 credits) The course applies international and comparative perspectives to the problem of white collar crime in the HKSAR. The topics covered include defining `white collar crime', money laundering, terrorist financing, forfeiture/confiscation of crime tainted property, corporate criminal liability, punishing the corporation, investigating and prosecuting white collar crime, and possibly others. LLAW3091. Ethnicity, human rights and democracy (6 credits) The rise of ethnic consciousness and the prevalence of conflicts based on diverse ethnic claims raise fundamental problems for rights and democracy. The course examines the causes of the rise of ethnicity and the challenges it poses to rights and democracy. The dominant modes of rights and liberal democracy, based on notions of the individual (or citizen) and social homogeneity, seem to clash with the claims of groups rights and cultural relativism. Many recent developments in the regime of rights and international law respond to this clash: the rise of rights of indigenous peoples, consociatialist democracy, new modes of expression of self-determination, developments in the rights of minorities, various forms of autonomy, the expansion of the scope of humanitarian intervention, and the adaptation of bills of rights to accommodate multi-culturalism. LLAW3093 Administrative Law (6 credits) The topics which may be included in the course in any particular year include theories of administrative decision-making, judicial review of administrative action (ultra vires and procedural fairness, Wednesbury unreasonableness, proportionality, abuse of power), delegated legislation, administrative law remedies, control of law-making by delegates, the practical aspects of bringing an action for judicial review under Order 53 of the Rules of the High Court, non-curial means of control and scrutiny of administrative action (Ombudsman, Administrative appeals, public enquiries), the structure and operation of administrative tribunals in Hong Kong, the Bill of Rights and review of administrative decision-making in Hong Kong, and access to information. LLAW3101. Cybercrime (6 credits) `Cybercrime' refers to computer-mediated activities which are either criminal or regarded as illicit and which can be conducted through global electronic networks. It encompasses cybercrimes against the person (e.g. cyber-stalking, cyber-pornography), cybercrimes against property (e.g. hacking, viruses, causing damage to data, cyber-fraud), and cyber-terrorism. The computer-age has also provided organized crime with more sophisticated and potentially secure techniques for supporting and developing networks for a range of criminal activities, including drugs trafficking, money laundering, illegal arms trafficking, and smuggling. Cybercrime poses new challenges for criminal justice, criminal law, and law enforcement. This course will examine the nature of and problems created by cybercrime, along with some of the legal and policy challenges arising in relation to the development of national and international law enforcement and regulatory responses to cybercrime. 223 FACULTY OF SCIENCE Department of Biochemistry BIOC1001 Basic biochemistry (6 credits) This course is designed to present an overview of biochemistry and to provide an understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying life processes. It is an independent course which can be taken by students from various disciplines. The course also prepares students for further studies in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Prerequisite AS Biology or AS Chemistry BIOC1003 Introduction to molecular genetics (6 credits) The objectives of this course are to provide students with basic and up-to-date knowledge on the structures and functions of nucleic acids, to give students a general picture of the molecular process of gene expressions, and to introduce students to recombinant DNA technology. Prerequisite AS Biology or AS Chemistry BIOC2601 Metabolism (6 credits) This course aims to provide the basic concepts of metabolism: the events and their importance in relation to the survival of living organisms. Taken together with BIOC1001 and BIOC2602, this will lay the foundation for the more advanced courses offered in the Biochemistry discipline. Prerequisite BIOC1001 BIOC2602 Understanding metabolic diseases (6 credits) To widen and deepen knowledge and understanding of metabolism. By using a problem-based learning (PBL) approach, students are trained in critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Students will be able to grasp the major effects on metabolic integration and control and they can use these concepts with greater confidence and success in approaching new problems and new areas of study. Prerequisite BIOC1001 Co-requisite BIOC2601 BIOC2603 Principles of molecular genetics (6 credits) To provide basic knowledge on molecular genetics, illustrating modern concepts with current experimental approaches and computer-assisted programmes. Together with BIOC3613 and BIOC3609 taken in the second year, a comprehensive background is provided for advanced study and/or research in molecular biology. Prerequisite BIOC1001 or BIOC1003 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL1125 or BIOL1106 BIOC2604 Essential techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology (6 credits) To give students a general overview of different experimental approaches and model systems, and to provide students with hands-on experience in basic biochemical and molecular techniques. Prerequisite BIOC1001 or BIOC1003 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL1125 or BIOL1106 224 BIOC2616 Directed studies in biochemistry (6 credits) To enhance the student's knowledge of a particular topic and the student's self-directed learning and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite Major in Biochemistry and at least 18 credits of introductory-level courses in Biochemistry. Not to be taken concurrently with BIOC3614. BIOC3608 Introduction to bioinformatics (6 credits) This course will examine existing programs and services available on the World Wide Web for DNA and protein sequence analysis. Students will also learn how to use the sequence analysis EMBOSS package installed locally. The underlying principles of these analysis programs and services will be presented. Students will learn how to retrieve, analyze, and compare protein and DNA sequence similarities. A basic introduction to protein modeling will also be presented. Prerequisite BIOC2603 or BIOL2303 or BIOL3308 BIOC3609 Molecular medicine * (6 credits) To provide up-to-date knowledge of the molecular and genetic basis of human diseases including cancer, thereby preparing the students for a career in medical molecular biology, biotechnological, pharmaceutical and genome research. Prerequisite BIOC2603 or BIOL2303; basic knowledge of molecular genetics and molecular biology is assumed * This course is not available to students taking BIOL3308 Applied Molecular Biology and/or BIOL3213 Advanced Techniques and Instrumentation in Animal Biology. BIOC3610 Advanced biochemistry I (6 credits) This is part of the advanced series designed to bring students to the understanding of current concepts, physicochemical bases and techniques in modern Biochemistry. The aim is to help students to develop critical thinking and analytical skills thus equipping them for beginning research projects or professional training in biomedical sciences. Prerequisite 1) BIOC1001; and 2) BIOL2301; and 3) BIOC2601 or BIOL2115 BIOC3611 Advanced biochemistry II (6 credits) This is part of the advanced series designed to bring students to the understanding of current concepts, physicochemical bases and techniques in modern biochemistry. Hence to equip them for beginning research projects or professional training in biomedical sciences. Prerequisite BIOL3610 BIOC3613 Molecular biology of the gene (6 credits) To provide an up-to-date knowledge of molecular biology, especially with respect to the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression, molecular embryology. Prerequisite BIOC2603 or BIOL2303 or BIOL3308 225 BIOC3614 Biochemistry project (12 credits) To enable students to acquire the basic skills in scientific research: literature search, critical reasoning, communication, teamwork and time management. The course is particularly useful for those students who intend to pursue a career in life science. Prerequisite BIOC1001 and BIOC2604 and good overall performance in 2nd year courses Co-requisite BIOC3610, BIOC3611, BIOC3612 BIOC3615 Advanced techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology (6 credits) This is an advanced experimental-based course for students majoring in Biochemistry and related disciplines. The aim is to provide the necessary training for students to pursuit postgraduate research education and potential employment in a scientific laboratory/industry environment. Prerequisite 1) BIOC1001; and 2) BIOC0002 or BIOC1003; and 3) BIOC2604 School of Biological Sciences BIOL0002 Introduction to food and nutritional science (3 credits) The course enables students to gain an appreciation of the scope of Food Science as a discipline. This is an independent course which can be taken by students from various disciplines. It also prepares students for further studies in Food and Nutritional Science. Prerequisite Nil BIOL0118 Bioethics (6 credits) The aim is to explore the ethical implications of the latest major advances in biology and medicine. Prerequisite Nil BIOL0120 The gene * (3 credits) The objective of the course is to expose students to the impacts of gene to the modern society. With the completion of the human genome in the next three years not only promises a better quality of life, it also brings lots of technical and ethical issues that the general public need to deal with. The goal of the course is designed to open up students from all backgrounds to this basic unit of inheritance called gene and its impact on various other scientific and social disciplines. Outline includes but not limited to the chemical basis of gene, gene evolution, gene chips, animal cloning, gene and disease, human genome and computer science, gene and behavior, genetic implications to law and society. Prerequisite Nil (not offered to students with AL Biology) * Students with a pass in AL / AS Biology or who are in the Biology, Biochemistry, Animal and Plant Biotechnology, Biotechnology, Environmental Life Science, and Food and Nutritional Science programmes / major and who are taking or have taken YSCN0004 are not allowed to take this course. BIOL0126 Fundamentals of biology * (6 credits) This course is designed to provide students a general concept of the various disciplines of experimental biology and prepare them for further intermediate and advanced courses in biology. It takes a 226 systematic approach to look at the key principles that govern the survival of life forms. The course is opened to those who wish to take a minor in Biology or General Science but do not have A-level biology. Prerequisite HKCEE Biology * Students who have passed HKAL Biology should take BIOL1122 Fundamental Biology. This course is not available to students who have taken BIOL1122 or any level 2 and level 3 biology courses. BIOL0127 Contemporary nutrition: insights and controversies * (3 credits) What you eat greatly affects your well-being, and this is especially true in recent years when nutrition has become one of the hottest topics in town for men and women of all ages. What food is good for our health? How much do we need to eat? Which dietary plan is scientifically sound and effective? Everywhere we go, we are bombarded by different messages, from vitamins to functional food products, on how food components or treatments impact on body functions and health. How reliable is the information from the mass media? Are these facts or myths? This course aims to provide health conscious individuals with fundamental knowledge to decipher information related to nutrition and health. Such knowledge is vital to everyone not just in a trendy fashion or for a short term dietary plan, it is essential to the building of good eating habits that could promote health for a lifetime. Prerequisite Nil * Not for students in the Food and Nutritional Science programme, major or minor. Not for students who have taken BIOL1514. BIOL0128 Biological techniques, instrumentation and data processing (6 credits) This course is designed to provide students with a wide range of basic biological techniques, principles of instruments and data processing. Basic concepts in protein/DNA purification including precautions, detection and verification of purified products are included. The course is also opened to those who wish to take a major or a minor in Biology for General Science. Prerequisite HKCEE Biology or equivalent BIOL0129 Introductory microbiology (3 credits) The course will provide an introduction to the microbial diversity of life on earth including bacteria, fungi, microalgae, viruses, and other microorganisms. Emphasis will be placed on organisms that are of importance in our everyday lives. The course will provide an essential foundation for all biology students, as an understanding of the role and uses of microorganisms is a basic requirement of most biological subjects. The course leads to various 2nd and 3rd level courses in microbiology. Prerequisite Nil BIOL0130 Introduction to the biotechnology industry (3 credits) Through an introduction to the history and technology of some of the most successful biotechnology companies, students will be able to understand the recent advances in the biotechnology industry. Prerequisite HKCEE Biology BIOL0131 Human microbiology (3 credits) This course will provide an introduction to microbes associated with humans including bacteria, fungi, microalgae, viruses and other microorganisms. Emphasis will be placed on organisms that are of 227 importance in our everyday lives and illustrated with topical examples where possible. Prerequisite Nil BIOL0132 Practical microbiology * (3 credits) To train students in the basic skills of laboratory and field microbiology. Prerequisite Nil Co-requisite BIOL1119 or BIOL0129 * Offered from 2008-2009. BIOL0601 (ECOL0020) Ecology of Hong Kong (3 credits) This course covers the ecology and biodiversity of terrestrial, marine and freshwater environments in Hong Kong Prerequisite Nil BIOL0602 (ECOL0036) Origins of life and astrobiology (3 credits) To consider the origins of life on Earth, what makes a planet habitable and the influence of early life forms on Earth's biosphere. To review evidence for the existence of other habitable planets and the concept that life can be transported across inter-planetary distances. To examine the challenges that face mankind if he is to consider life in space or on other planets. Prerequisite Nil BIOL0603 (ECOL0040) Ecology and evolution (3 credits) This course provides an introduction to how the ecology and behaviour of animals has been shaped by evolution, and demonstrates how we can understand and explain the significance of what we see in nature. The course objectives are as follows: To explain how the environment affects organisms in terms of their present-day ecology (determining where they live and how many can survive there) and, through natural selection acting over past generations, influences their form and adaptations. To introduce the basic principles of ecology and evolution, showing how they are linked to the environment by the phenomenon of adaptation. To describe the patterns of interactions among individuals (e.g. mating systems and reproduction, social behaviour, competition, and predation), and explain some of the simple principles that under their occurrence and evolution. To introduce the concept of biodiversity, how it is generated by adaptive radiation, how it is estimated, and its importance to humans. Prerequisite Nil BIOL0604 (ECOL0041) Evolutionary diversity (6 credits) To provide students with an introduction to the diversity of plant and animal life. Recent research has resulted in fundamental changes in our understanding of evolutionary history (phylogeny). Current evolutionary trees will be used as the basis for a survey of different groups in phylogenetic sequence, and for understanding how structures, processes and behaviours have changed through time. Prerequisite Nil 228 BIOL 0605 (ECOL0042) Ecology field course (3 credits) This 5-day residential field course, including lectures and briefing sessions, provides students with an opportunity to visit a variety of habitats in Hong Kong, and to observe directly the main environmental factors that prevail in each of them. Emphasis will be placed on guiding students to become familiar with common local plants and animals and their habitats. Prerequisite Nil BIOL1106 Genetics (3 credits) The objective of the course is to provide an introduction to the various aspects of genetics. At the end of the course students are expected to know the fundamentals of classical, population and molecular genetics. Prerequisite AL Biology BIOL1107 Introduction to developmental biology & reproduction (3 credits) The course is designed to provide an introduction to developmental biology and reproduction animals through an integrated approach. Reproductive and developmental processes will be examined at the cellular and organismic levels. Prerequisite AL Biology BIOL1121 Animal form and functions (3 credits) This is a fundamental course which intends to show the students the major animal life forms on earth and how they can survive in a given environment. The relationships between body forms, body architectures, environmental interactions, functional adaptations and evolution will be illustrated. Prerequisite AL Biology BIOL1122 Functional biology * (6 credits) The course is designed to provide an introduction to modern developments in experimental biology through an integrated approach. Life processes will be examined at the molecular, cellular and organismic level. Prerequisite AL Biology * BIOL0126 and BIOL1122 are mutually exclusive. BIOL1123 Food chemistry (3 credits) The course is designed to give students a basic understanding of chemistry of the major and minor components in food systems. Prerequisite AL or AS Chemistry BIOL1125 Introduction to biochemistry * (6 credits) 229 This course is designed to provide undergraduate (non-biochemistry major) an overview of fundamental concepts in biochemistry as well as hands-on experience in biochemical techniques. Prerequisite AL or AS Biology * Students who passed BIOC1001 Basic Biochemistry are not allowed to take this course. BIOL1513 Food science laboratory (3 credits) The course is designed to introduce students to some basic practical training related to food science and nutrition. Prerequisite AL or AS Chemistry BIOL1514 Nutrition and metabolism * (6 credits) This is an independent course compulsory for students in the Food & Nutritional Science programme, but also opens to students in other life sciences disciplines. The fundamental concepts in nutrition will be introduced. An integrated approach will be used in discussing the interactions between diet and intermediary metabolism. Prerequisite AL or AS Biology * BIOL1514 and BIOL2510 are mutually exclusive. BIOL2004 Bioexploitation of filamentous fungi (3 credits) This course provides and overview of the uses of filamentous fungi in biotechnology, the potential uses of fungal products and the methods by which scientists search for and develop these new products. Prerequisite BIOL1119 or BIOL0129 BIOL2109 Economic botany * (6 credits) To provide an understanding of the scientific principles, processes, and practices involved in the utilization of crops and other economics plants. At the end of the course students are expected to be scientifically knowledgeable on the plants and plant products they encounter everyday. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 * Not offered in 2007-2008. BIOL2111 Molecular microbiology (6 credits) This course is intended for biology, biotechnology and biochemistry students who would like to understand the modern fundamentals of microbiology. At the end of the course the students are expected to know the physiological, biochemical and molecular aspects of microbiology. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 BIOL2112 Plant physiology (6 credits) To give an understanding of plant processes such as plant growth and development and their regulatory mechanisms. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 230 BIOL2114 Plant biochemistry and molecular biology (6 credits) To present current developments in selected areas of plant biochemistry and plant molecular biology. Prerequisite BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 BIOL2115 Cell biology & cell technology (6 credits) To provide a coherent understanding of the structure and function of cells, and the principles and applications of cell culture and instrumentation in biology and biotechnology. Prerequisite BIOL1101or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 or BIOC1001 or BIOL1125 BIOL2116 Genetics I (6 credits) This is the first of an integrated pair of courses, Genetics I and Genetics II, aiming to provide balanced coverage of many areas in genetics. The focus of Genetics I is on the basic principles of genetics. Genetics II will cover more advanced topics of modern genetics. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 BIOL2117 Genetics II (6 credits) This is the second of an integrated pair of courses, Genetics I and Genetics II, aiming to provide balanced coverage of many areas in genetics. The focus of Genetics I is on the basic principles of genetics. Genetics II covers more advanced topics of genetics. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 BIOL2201 Neuroscience * (6 credits) To provide a comprehensive picture of how the nervous system and neurones work in animals both as sensory input, integrator, motor output, and for learning, memory and behavourial patterns. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 * Not offered in 2007-2008. BIOL2203 Reproduction & Reproductive Biotechnology (6 credits) To provide comprehensive overview on modern concepts and recent advancements in reproductive biology & biotechnology. Prerequisite AL / AS Biology (preferably with BIOL0126 or BIOL1107) BIOL2205 Basic immunology * (6 credits) To provide a broad understanding of animal immune systems. Topics will also include the application of a variety of immunological methods to research and disease diagnosis. Prerequisite BIOC1001 or BIOL1125 or BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or 231 BIOL0126 * BIOL2205 Basic Immunology is not available to students taking BIOC2606 Applied Human Biochemistry. BIOL2207 Endocrinology (6 credits) To provide an advanced course on hormones and regulation of metabolism. Prerequisite BIOC1001 or BIOL1125 or BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 BIOL2208 Vertebrate comparative anatomy and palaeontology * (6 credits) This course provides the anatomical background to comprehend the evolutionary and functional adaptations in vertebrate animals through to the evolution of man. The course will examine both the fossil evidence and the comparison of anatomical structures in existing forms. The course is open to Biological Science students, Geology and Earth Science students and welcome others from non-science curricular. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 * Not offered in 2007-2008. BIOL2209 Developmental biology * (6 credits) The course provides important insights into mechanisms regulating the early stages of animal life and is particularly relevant to the understanding of the functional aspects of body systems. Prerequisite BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1107 * Not offered in 2007-2008. BIOL2210 Evolution (6 credits) Since Darwin's discovery of evolution by natural selection, the science of evolutionary biology and genetics have developed together during the 20th century, leading to the Modern Synthesis or neo-Darwinism. This course attempts to provide a basic understanding of the modern theory of evolution and the mechanisms that underlie evolutionary changes. Prerequisite BIOL1106 BIOL2215 Animal physiology (6 credits) To provide a fundamental understanding on the processes that dictate the functions and activities of living matters with particular references to animals and humans. An integrated approach is emphasized to provide students the perspective on how homeostasis is achieved through the coordination of systems and functions. Prerequisite BIOC1001 or BIOL1125 or BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 BIOL2217 General parasitology (3 credits) The course is aimed to provide students with a broad basic knowledge on major aspects of general 232 parasitology. Students will be exposed to the taxonomy of parasites: from protozoa to Platyhelminthes. The lectures will also focus on the growth cycles of parasites, their means of infection, reproductive strategies and the host-parasite interactions. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 BIOL2301 Protein structure and function * (6 credits) To provide students with a good understanding of protein structure, how structure subserves function, and the methods for study of both. This course provides a strong foundation for advanced courses in biochemistry and biotechnology. Prerequisite BIOC1001 or BIOL1125 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 * The Department of Biochemistry also contributes to the teaching of the course. BIOL2302 Fermentation technology (6 credits) To introduce the key concepts and principles involved in fermentation technology, and discuss how fermentation technology is used in the food and biotechnology industries. Prerequisite BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1105 or BIOL1123 or BIOL1119 or BIOL0129 BIOL2303 Introduction to molecular biology (6 credits) To provide students with basic knowledge in molecular biology and gene cloning techniques with emphasis on manufacturing of cell products. This course will give Biology students a complete picture of the recent developments and applications in gene technology and prepare biotechnology students for further advanced course in genetic engineering. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 BIOL2318 Biological sciences field course (6 credits) This course is offered as a capstone requirement, and provides an experiential learning experience. The component of the course requires intense study of a topic during a field course, inside or outside Hong Kong. Prerequisite Nil BIOL2319 Biological sciences internship (6 credits) This course is offered as a capstone requirement, and is an experiential learning experience. The component includes a period of internship with a member of staff normally over the summer vacation. The student will be given a project or various tasks to perform as instructed by the member of staff. Please contact the course coordinator for details. Prerequisite Nil BIOL2320 Directed studies in biological sciences (6 credits) Students will undertake a dissertation on an agreed topic in biological sciences. The student will develop scientific writing and presentation skills, and will make extensive use of IT and library 233 resources. Prerequisite Requires completion of relevant level 1 courses BIOL2501 Food processing and preservation (6 credits) An introduction to the basic principles and methodology of food processing and preservation technology with emphasis on major methods including high and low temperature processing, concentration and dehydration, and food packaging. Prerequisite BIOL0002 or BIOL1105 or BIOL1123 BIOL2502 Food technology * (6 credits) This course is intended for students planning to enter the food industry. This course offers an introduction to physical and engineering principles relevant to the food industry, and an in-depth analysis of selected methods and problems in food processing and preservation. Prerequisite BIOL0002 or BIOL1105 or BIOL1123 * Not offered in 2007-2008. BIOL2503 Grain production & utilization (6 credits) To provide a broad understanding of the utilization and significance of the major grains in the food industry and in human health and nutrition. Prerequisite BIOL0002 or BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL1105 or BIOL1123 BIOL2505 Food safety and quality management (6 credits) To provide exposure to some key management concepts used to produce safe high-quality food products that will succeed in the marketplace. To introduce students to the use of the business case-study method in individual, team and class-based learning. Prerequisite BIOL0002 or BIOL1105 or BIOL1123 BIOL2507 Meat and dairy science (6 credits) To provide a broad understanding on modern practice and technology of meat and dairy production, processing and marketing. Prerequisite BIOL1102 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1105 or BIOL1123 BIOL2515 Food microbiology (6 credits) This course provides the key concepts and principles of food microbiology with special emphasis on the interaction between microorganisms and food. Microbial food production, microbial food spoilage and foodborne diseases will be discussed in detail. Prerequisite BIOL0002 or BIOL1105 or BIOL1123 BIOL2517 Food analysis (3 credits) 234 To introduce the key concepts in professional food analysis in an industry context. To discuss the choice of analytical methods and the interpretation of results. Major instrumental techniques used in food analysis will be covered. Prerequisite BIOC1001 or BIOL1125 or BIOL1104 or BIOL0128 or BIOL1122 or BIOL0126 or BIOL1123 BIOL2518 Laboratory in nutritional science (3 credits) To provide students a comprehensive training on laboratory techniques, experimental approaches and the use of different model systems in nutritional sciences. This course aims to equip students with the basic skills in conducting nutritional studies. Prerequisite BIO1514 BIOL2519 Essential nutrients & functional foods * (6 credits) The course has two interrelated parts. First, the functional roles of essential micronutrients in physiologic and metabolic processes will be presented. Second, the concept of functional foods and their role in disease risk reduction will be discussed. The course would appeal to students who have interest in the science, marketing and regulatory aspects of health foods and dietary supplements. Prerequisite BIOL1514 * Not for students who have taken BIOL3511. BIOL2520 Food toxicology (3 credits) To provide an understanding of the basic concepts of toxicology and to discuss the major types of toxins and food contaminants found in food and food handling processes. Prerequisite BIOL1105 or BIOL1123 BIOL2521 Food engineering (6 credits) This course is intended for students planning to enter the food industry. This course offers an introduction to physical and engineering principles relevant to the food industry, and an in-depth analysis of selected methods and problems in food processing and preservation. Prerequisite BIOL0002 or BIOL1105 or BIOL1123 BIOL2606 (ECOL2004) Environmental microbiology (6 credits) To familiarize students with the role of microorganisms in natural processes which affect our environment such as the recycling of chemical elements, interactions with plants and animals, and the ways in which they carry out biodegradation of environmentally important pollutants. Key concepts are illustrated with local case studies and practical classes. Prerequisite BIOL1119 or BIOL0129 BIOL2607 (ECOL2005) Fish biology (6 credits) To acquaint students with the principles governing interrelationships among fishes as well as with the biotic and abiotic aspects of their environment thereby to provide an understanding of the factors determining species population dynamics and multispecies interactions. Special emphasis will be 235 placed on coral reef assemblages with an introduction to local reef fishes. Prerequisite BIOL1121 or BIOL0603 (ECOL0040) or BIOL0604 (ECOL0041) BIOL2608 (ECOL2006) Biometrics (6 credits) To introduce students to experimental design and statistical data analysis at an elementary to intermediate level, with an emphasis on practical applications of statistical methods to experimental and observational data in biology and ecology. A range of topics will be addressed, particularly those involving descriptions of populations and communities, biodiversity, ecophysiology and ecological impacts associated with pollution. To illustrate each statistical method, examples will be drawn from real cases, with consideration of the biological or ecological background of the problem and appropriate experimental design, statistical analysis and interpretation. Use will be made of statistical software such as SPSS, SAS and PRIMER for statistical computing. SPSS is powerful and easy to use, and available on HKU networked computers. Computer laboratories will be organised to familarise students with statistical computation using the software. Prerequisite BIOL0603 (ECOL0040) BIOL2609 (ECOL2007) Molecular ecology (6 credits) To familiarize students with the molecular aspects of evolution, populations and conservation. To review case studies where molecular data has solved ecological questions. To provide students with practical training in molecular techniques useful in ecology and environmental science. Prerequisite BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 or BIOL1106 or BIOL0604 (ECOL0041) BIOL2610 (ECOL2011) Biological oceanography (6 credits) This course provides an introduction to the physical, chemical, geological and biological processes that occur in oceans. The emphasis is on how marine organisms interact with each other and with their environment by considering various ecosystems. Specific examples from South East Asia, the South China Sea and Hong Kong will be included. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 or BIOL0603 (ECOL0040) or BIOL0604 (ECOL0041) or BIOL0605 (ECOL0042) or EASC0105 or EASC0116 are preferred BIOL2611 (ECOL2013) Systematics & phylogenetics (6 credits) To give students an understanding of the principles of systematics and phylogenetics and an appreciation of current trends and controversies. Systematics forms an invaluable grounding for many fields of biology (including anatomy, ecology, population biology and evolutionary biology), and enables the integration of a wide range of techniques (including anatomy, biochemistry, chemistry, molecular biology, cytology, palaeontology and ethology). Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL0604 (ECOL0041) BIOL2612 (ECOL2014) Conservation biology (6 credits) To introduce students to the theory and practice of biological conservation. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or BIOL1121 or ECOL0038 or BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 or BIOL0604 (ECOL0041) 236 BIOL2613 (ECOL2015) Fungal diversity (6 credits) To study the spectacular diversity of fungi and their roles in the environment. Fungi are extremely important in most of earth's processes and have developed interesting adaptations and forms. This course will examine the diversity and forms that fungi have taken and explore some of their unique roles in our environment. This course qualifies as a capstone experience. Prerequisite BIOL1119 or BIOL0129 BIOL2614 (ECOL2016) Environmental toxicology (6 credits) To introduce students to the basic principles of environmental and ecological toxicology. Specific cases from the current literature will be used and analyzed. Emphasis will be on aquatic ecosystems. Prerequisite BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 or BIOL2606 (ECOL2004) or CHEM1001 BIOL2615 (ECOL2023) Freshwater ecology (6 credits) Introduce, illustrate and explain the physical and biological processes that occur in drainage basins, their importance to human populations and biodiversity, and the impacts and management of freshwater resources subject to multiple uses. Examples from the Mekong River Basin and/or Hong Kong to human dependence on freshwater ecosystems and the important role that they play in sustaining livelihoods in Asia. Prerequisite BIOL0601 (ECOL0020), BIOL0603 (ECOL0040) and BIOL0604 (ECOL0041) are preferred BIOL2616 (ECOL2024) Plant structure and evolution (3 credits) To survey the form and function of the vascular plant body, with particular emphasis on the evolutionary significance of various structures. This forms a basis for understanding plant physiology, ecology, systematics and phylogeny. Prerequisite BIOL1101 or ECOL0038 or BIOL0604 (ECOL0041) BIOL2617 (ECOL2028) Coastal ecology (6 credits) To examine the communities of coastal systems: their distribution, composition and the factors which regulate them. This course will examine, using an experimental approach, patterns exhibited by a range of shores and the deterministic and stochastic processes that create and sustain them. Hong Kong shores will be used as examples but comparisons will be drawn from the coastlines of the world. Prerequisite ECOL2006 or BIOL0603 (ECOL0040) or BIOL0604 (ECOL0041) are preferred BIOL2618 (ECOL2029) How humans evolved (6 credits) This course describes the origins of modern humans through evolution by natural selection. Major topics include tracing our evolution by means of the fossil record; our relationship to monkeys, apes and other primates; and, the main ecological and cultural transformations of our species over time. In short, this course answers the question: where did we come from? Emphasis is placed on ultimate causes: why have we evolved to become what we are today? And, what has driven human evolution? Consequences of human dominance of the present-day Earth will be discussed also. Prerequisite BIOL0603 (ECOL0040) or BIOL0604 (ECOL0041) 237 BIOL2619 (ECOL2032) Terrestrial ecology (6 credits) To enable motivated students to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to solve real problems in terrestrial ecology. Prerequisite BIOL0601 (ECOL0020), BIOL0603 (ECOL0040) and BIOL0605 (ECOL0042) BIOL2620 (ECOL2044) Extremophiles * (3 credits) To consider advanced aspects of the following: a) The biodiversity and ecology of extant prokaryotes and eukaryotes in extreme habitats; b) Stress responses to extreme conditions at the cellular level; c) Prokaryotic extremophiles as analogues for early life; d) The application of extremophiles in astrobiology and biotechnology. Prerequisite BIOC1001 or BIOL1119 or BIOL0129 * Not offered in 2007-2008. BIOL3212 Applied immunology * (6 credits) A follow-up course of BIOL2205. The aim is to provide the latest knowledge on the practical applications of Immunology in biological research, serodiagnosis and industries. Prerequisite BIOL2205 * BIOL3212 Applied Immunology is not available to students taking BIOC2606 Applied Human Biochemistry. BIOL3213 Advanced techniques and instrumentation in animal biology * (6 credits) A follow-up course of BIOL1104/BIOL0128. The aim of this course is to introduce students with the latest techniques and instrumentation used in animal biological research. Prerequisite 1) BIOL1104 or BIOL0128; and 2) BIOL2303 * BIOL3213 Advanced Techniques and Instrumentation in Animal Biology is not available to students taking BIOC3609 Molecular Medicine. Not offered in 2007-2008. BIOL3214 General virology (6 credits) This Course provides the fundamental principles of virology so that students can understand the pathogenesis of major viral diseases that affect animal health. The course will prepare students for profession or graduate work in virology, medicine and biotechnology. Prerequisite BIOC2603 or BIOC1003 or BIOL2303 or BIOL2205 BIOL3307 The biotechnology industry (6 credits) This course provides an overview of the various fields of biotechnologies, the development of a biotechnology product, and the operation of biotechnology companies. Prerequisite BIO2603 or BIOL2303 238 BIOL3315 Animal biotechnology (6 credits) This course discusses the key concepts and principles involved in animal biotechnology, and their applications in animal industry and molecular medicine. Prerequisite BIOC2603 or BIOL2303 BIOL3316 Plant biotechnology (6 credits) This course covers the principles and applications of plant biotechnology. The significance of plant biotechnology in agriculture and its emerging role in molecular farming for production of biopharmaceuticals and other high-value proteins will be discussed. Prerequisite BIOC2603 or BIOL2303 BIOL3317 Microbial biotechnology (6 credits) This course is intended for students who would like to understand the application of modern microbiology in biotechnology. The microbial systems being used include different types of viruses, bacteria, fungi and algae. At the end of the course the students are expected to know the parameters and conditions that affect the yield of production and the systems available for the expression of vaious types of biotechnology products. Prerequisite BIOC2603 or BIOL2303 BIOL3321 Biological sciences project (12 credits) To provide experience of biological research by planning and carrying out a small project under the supervision of a member of staff. Prerequisite Good performance in level 2 courses BIOL3323 Molecular microbial ecology * (3 credits) This advanced course focuses upon the recent advances made in environmental phylogenetics and genomics, and demonstrates how molecular datasets have enhanced our understanding of microbial communities in the natural environment. Prerequisite BIOL2111 or BIOL2606 (ECOL2004) * Offered from 2008-2009. BIOL3516 Nutrition and brain function (3 credits) To highlight the impact of nutrient provision on brain function and to discuss various effects of nutrition and diet on mental function and behaviour. Prerequisite BIOL2215 or BIOL2519 BIOL3522 Nutrigenomics (3 credits) Recent advances in the understanding of human genes has resulted in the emergence of a new science called Nutrigenomics. This course aims to provide students a basic understanding on the relation between genetic variation and diet-related diseases. A genetically-based nutrition and dietary therapy intervention approach for maintenance of health will be explored. 239 Prerequisite BIOC1001 or BIOL1125 or BIOL1106 or BIOL2303 BIOL3523 Principles of Chinese medicated diet (3 credits) To provide basic knowledge on Chinese medicated diet. Illustrating historical and modern concepts of Chinese Medicated diet and encourage research and development with current experimental approaches. This is a valuable course for students in the Food and Nutritional Science programme, but also opens to students in other programmes. Prerequisite BIOL2519 BIOL3524 Diet and disease (3 credits) The course deals with diseases associated with diet and basic dietetics. Prerequisite BIOL1514 and BIOL2519 BIOL3525 Food product development (3 credits) To introduce the key concepts and techniques used in food product development. Students will work in small groups to design, develop and produce a new food product. Appropriate for students in Food and Nutritional Science Programme or Major. Prerequisite BIOL2501 or permission of the course coordinator BIOL3526 Advanced laboratory in nutritional science (3 credits) This course is a follow-up to BIOL2518. The emphasis will be on human nutrition related techniques. Taken together, the two courses will provide students the necessary knowledge to pursuit postgraduate research education as well as potential employment as a nutritionist in public and private sectors. Prerequisite BIOL1514 and BIOL2518 BIOL3621 (ECOL3018) Fisheries and mariculture (6 credits) Theoretical and practical aspects of marine fisheries and mariculture will be covered to provide an understanding of the condition of global and local fishery resources as well as the importance of biological and ecological studies to their management. The role of mariculture in global fish supply will be examined and local fishery and mariculture examples provided. Prerequisite BIOL2607 (ECOL2005) BIOL3622 (ECOL3027) Environmental impact assessment (6 credits) To familiarise students with the principles of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), and to examine current pollution problems and their management in Hong Kong. This course is designed to prepare students who are interested in future employment in the environmental sector. Management strategies for pollution monitoring and control will be discussed with special reference to Hong Kong case studies. This course will describe the EIA process in Hong Kong, which will be compared with approaches used in China, the United States and Europe. Prerequisite BIOL0601 (ECOL0020), BIOL0603 (ECOL0040) and BIOL0605 (ECOL0042) 240 BIOL3623 (ECOL3030) Environmental remediation * (3 credits) To introduce the standard parameters in environmental monitoring, the scientific meaning and the practical monitoring techniques used. The focus of the course will be both the field and laboratory analysis, and implement of the monitoring. Local example will be used to illustrate the power of environmental monitoring and identification of the source of pollution. Prerequisite BIOL1103 or ECOL1103 or ECOL0035 or BIOL2606 (ECOL2004) Not offered in 2007-2008. BIOL3624 (ECOL3034) Environmental monitoring and remediation techniques (6 credits) To introduce the standard parameters in environmental monitoring, and the scientific basis of practical monitoring techniques. The focus of the course will be on both the analysis and application of new environmental technology. Local examples will be used to illustrate the power of environmental monitoring and identification of pollution sources, as well as the success of implementation of treatment techniques. Prerequisite BIOL2606 (ECOL2004) or BIOL2614 (ECOL2016) Department of Chemistry CHEM0003 Chemistry and daily life * (3 credits) This general education course is designed as an elective for students in all disciplines and all years without strong chemistry background. It gives an overview of some important chemical aspects that we encounter in our daily life. Prerequisite Nil (not offered to Chemistry major students) * Students who are taking or have taken CHEM1101, CHEM1206, CHEM1502, CHEM1506 or YSCN0011 are not allowed to take CHEM0003. CHEM0004 Fundamental chemistry * (9 credits) This course aims at providing students, who are interested in Chemistry, or taking Chemistry as a minor, a foundation course in general chemistry. It covers the essential knowledge of Chemistry on various topics. Students who have taken the course will have a good background to study other courses offered in the Department of Chemistry. Prerequisite HKCEE Chemistry (students with AS Chemistry should first obtain approval from the department) * Not available to those who have taken HKAL Chemistry or equivalent, HKU-SPACE Community College Chemistry I or II. CHEM1002 Principles and concepts (6 credits) To provide basic knowledge of modern chemistry. This course is a pre-requisite for the advanced chemistry courses. Prerequisite AL or AS Chemistry CHEM1003 The molecular world (6 credits) 241 To provide students with the basic principles and knowledge of inorganic and organic chemistry and to introduce their relevance to biological processes and materials science. This course provides the foundation for further studies in both inorganic and organic chemistry. Prerequisite AL or AS Chemistry CHEM1004 Chemistry: an experimental science I (6 credits) To cover the principles and applications of basic chemical laboratory techniques. This course is required for Chemistry Majors and highly recommended for Chemistry Minors. Prerequisite AL or AS Chemistry CHEM1005 Introduction to materials science (6 credits) The course provides an introductory and coherent treatment of materials of current importance. It provides physical and chemistry basis for the diverse properties of materials. Materials of the course will be delivered by instructors from both the Physics and Chemistry Departments. Prerequisite AL or AS Physics Co-requisite CHEM1002 CHEM1006 Introduction to forensic science (3 credits) This course is designed as an elective course to provide a basic foundation in the field of forensic science for students with general science or equivalent background. Without having to be major in chemistry, the students are allowed to learn and experience the various methods used in investigating crimes. Prerequisite AL or AS Chemistry CHEM1007 Basic chemistry for biological sciences (6 credits) This course is designed for students who are not Major in Chemistry. It will provide basic knowledge for the understanding of the involvement of chemical principles in processes taking place on biological systems through a number of application studies. Prerequisite AL or AS Chemistry CHEM1406 Basic organic chemistry * (6 credits) To educate the student in the terminology, methodology and problem solving skills appropriate to the study of carbon based molecules in both their academic and practical applications. This course is a pre-requisite for CHEM2402, Intermediate Organic Chemistry. Prerequisite AL or AS Chemistry * CHEM1401 and CHEM1406 are mutually exclusive. Students who planning to take CHEM2402 should take CHEM1406. CHEM2102 Environmental chemistry (6 credits) This course introduces students to Environmental Chemistry and enables them to understand the chemical principles involved in various environmental phenomena and processes. Prerequisite CHEM1001 or CHEM1002 or CHEM1502 or CHEM1506 or CHEM1007 242 CHEM2103 Chemical process industries and analysis (6 credits) To familiarize with typical chemical industries important in local and global economy. To understand the technology of chemicals manufacturing and chemical processes in general industry. Prerequisite CHEM1002 or CHEM1502 or CHEM1506 CHEM2109 Introduction to materials chemistry (6 credits) This course provides an introduction to materials chemistry. Some basic material characterization techniques will also be introduced. This course is essential for students who wish to take advanced materials course. Prerequisite CHEM1301 or CHEM1406 CHEM2111 Directed studies in chemistry * (6 credits) This course is designed for second year students who would like to take an early experience on research. It offers students an opportunity to carry out small scale chemical projects by themselves. Prerequisite CHEM1002, CHEM1003, CHEM1004, CHEM1206, CHEM1301, CHEM1406, CHEM1506 and CHEM2507 or CHEM2510 * CHEM2202 Chemical Instrumentation is not available to students who are taking or have taken CHEM2002 Instrumental Chemical Analysis. CHEM2202 Chemical instrumentation * (6 credits) To cover the basic principles and applications of chemical instrumentation. This course aims to provide a good working knowledge, in addition to the principles, of instruments that are commonly used in a chemical laboratory. Prerequisite CHEM1001 or (CHEM2510 and CHEM1004) or CHEM1201 or CHEM1206 * CHEM2202 Chemical Instrumentation is not available to students who are taking or have taken CHEM2002 Instrumental Chemical Analysis. CHEM2207 Food and water analysis (6 credits) To cover areas in the application of Analytical Chemistry and new analytical technique development with focus on food and water analysis. Prerequisite CHEM1206, CHEM2002 or CHEM2202 or CHEM2507 or CHEM2510 Co-requisite CHEM2002 or CHEM2202 CHEM2302 Intermediate inorganic chemistry (9 credits) This course aims to provide a more detailed treatment of general inorganic chemistry suited to the needs of those intending to extend their studies in chemistry. Prerequisite CHEM1301 or CHEM1003 CHEM2402 Intermediate organic chemistry (9 credits) 243 This course is a continuation from Basic Organic Chemistry. Together they provide a solid foundation of organic chemistry. Prerequisite CHEM1406 or CHEM1003 Co-requisite CHEM2507 or CHEM2510 CHEM2503 Intermediate physical chemistry (9 credits) This course presents a more detailed treatment of general physical chemistry topics in order to provide a solid foundation for those students intending to extend their studies in chemistry further. This course would stand on its own. Prerequisite CHEM1502 or CHEM1506 or CHEM1002 CHEM2509 Principles of chemical biology (6 credits) To understand how to use chemical approaches to emulate biological system to study natural molecules and generate new functional molecules. Useful as an introduction to research in areas of chemical biology, medicinal chemistry and biotechnology. Prerequisite CHEM1401 or CHEM1406 or BIOC1001 CHEM3105 Chemistry project * (12 credits) To provide experience of research techniques by working on a short project under the direct supervision of a member of staff. This course would prepare students for graduate school work in chemistry. Prerequisite 1) CHEM2202; and 2) CHEM2302; and 3) CHEM2402; and 4) CHEM2503 * Second year students with exceptional academic achievement may also apply for this course. CHEM3106 Symmetry, group theory and applications (6 credits) To introduce the concepts of symmetry and group theory and to apply them in solving chemical problems. This course also provides an introductory treatment of bonding theories, inorganic electronic and vibrational spectroscopy. This course is essential for students who wish to take advanced courses in inorganic chemistry and all types of spectroscopy. Prerequisite CHEM2302 CHEM3107 Interfacial science and technology (6 credits) To understand the science and technology of interfacial phenomena and processes often appeared in high value added products and modern technologies. Prerequisite CHEM2503 CHEM3110 Advanced materials (6 credits) This course is a continuation from Introduction to Materials Chemistry. It provides a more comprehensive overview on materials chemistry and application of materials in advanced technology. The most recent development in materials chemistry will also be introduced. Prerequisite CHEM2109 244 CHEM3203 Analytical chemistry (9 credits) To cover the principles and methodologies of Analytical Chemistry and its use in the analysis of gas, liquid and solid samples. Prerequisite CHEM2202 or CHEM2002 CHEM3204 Modern chemical instrumentation and applications (6 credits) The aim of the course is to provide an understanding of modern instrumentation, covering both fundamental principles and practical aspects of instrument design. The course will be of particular benefit to those pursuing a higher research degree or a career in technical sales/service. Prerequisite CHEM2202 CHEM3303 Advanced inorganic chemistry (9 credits) To give further, more detailed, treatment to topics mentioned in Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry and to develop new areas of interest. The course also aims to prepare students for graduate work in inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite CHEM2302 Co-requisite CHEM3106 CHEM3304 Organometallic chemistry (6 credits) To give further, more detailed, treatment to organometallic chemistry mentioned in Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry. The course also aims to introduce and familiarize students with advanced laboratory techniques, and to prepare students for graduate work in inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prerequisite CHEM2302 CHEM3403 Integrated Organic synthesis (9 credits) This course covers aspects of modern synthetic methods, develops the concept of synthetic planning, with relevance and in the context of drug synthesis, medicinal chemistry, and bioorganic chemistry, so as to provide an integrated approach to this subject. Prerequisite CHEM2402 CHEM3404 Advanced organic chemistry (6 credits) To provide students with knowledge in organic chemistry reaction mechanisms and organic compound structure determination. Prerequisite CHEM2402 CHEM3405 Organic chemistry of life (6 credits) To understand molecules and reactions of life sciences. Useful as an introduction to research in areas of bioorganic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and biotechnology. 245 Prerequisite CHEM1401 or CHEM2402 CHEM3407 Medicinal chemistry (6 credits) This course covers the chemical principles of drug design and drug action. Useful as an introduction to research in areas of bioorganic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry, and biotechnology. Prerequisite CHEM1401 or CHEM2402 CHEM3504 Advanced physical chemistry (9 credits) This course covers advanced topics in physical chemistry. It is offered for students majoring in physical chemistry and for students who are interested in postgraduate studies. Prerequisite CHEM2503 CHEM3505 Molecular spectroscopy * (6 credits) This course provides a unifying treatment of the theories and applications of some important types of spectroscopy. Essential for graduate work in all branches of chemistry. Prerequisite CHEM2503 * This course will not be offered in 2007-2008. Department of Earth Sciences EASC0002 Peaceful use of nuclear technologies (3 credits) To provide students with the basic knowledge on application of nuclear technologies in daily life and to invoke an awareness of current applications of nuclear sciences by case studies. Prerequisite Nil EASC0105 Earth through time (6 credits) To introduce the concepts of geological time and uniformitarianism. To provide an understanding of the fossil record, and the integration of Earth Systems and plate tectonics. To gain an appreciation of our place in the Universe, an understanding of the evolution of Earth and life on Earth through time. Prerequisite Nil EASC0117 Geological heritage of Hong Kong (3 credits) To give an overview of the geology of Hong Kong, potential geological resources for tourism and the role of geology in the development of Hong Kong's infrastructure. Prerequisite Nil EASC0118 Blue planet (6 credits) The course provides an overview of how our diverse and living planet Earth works. To understand the 246 global changes and environmental concerns around us, the course weaves together an understanding of processes in the Earth's lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and atmosphere which constantly interact in interdependent ways with one another making our planet function as an ever-changing dynamic system. The course is intended for students who are taking a first course in Earth Sciences.. Prerequisite Nil EASC0119 Solid earth (6 credits) This course provides an overview of the Earth's internal structure, material and internal and external processes. Prerequisite Nil EASC0120 Earth, environment and society (6 credits) This course provides an introduction to global environment and issues and how the Earth's environment affects the well-being of a society. Prerequisite Nil EASC0121 Earth's climate past and future (3 credits) This course provides an introduction to the study of global climate change by investigating the histories of past climates preserved in the geological record. We look at modern research methods that are used in paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental reconstructions and discuss how this information can be used to model possible climatic trends, such as global warming and the CO2 budget. Prerequisite Nil EASC1122 Physical and chemical properties of the earth (6 credits) To provide an understanding of chemical and physical principles as they are applied to processes occurring on the Earth. Prerequisite 1 AL science subject EASC1123 Planetary geology * (6 credits) This course provides students with an introduction to the origin, evolution, structure, composition and distribution of matter in the solar system condensed in the form of planets, satellites, comets, asteroids and rings with particular emphasis on surface features, internal structures and history from a geological point of view. The course incorporates the findings from recent space investigations, planetary imagery, remote sensing and Earth analogues to extraterrestrial features into a fascinating portrayal of the geological activities and histories in our Solar System. Prerequisite 1 AL science subject * Offered from 2008-2009. EASC2108 Structural geology (6 credits) The course covers the mechanical properties of rocks and how they are deformed, geological maps and their use in interpreting structure. Prerequisite EASC0101 247 Co-requisite EASC0101 EASC2109 Igneous and metamorphic petrology (6 credits) To provide a comprehensive coverage of the principles and techniques used in the study of igneous and metamorphic rocks and rock-forming processes. Prerequisite EASC1106 EASC2110 Earth dynamics (6 credits) To review the concepts and processes that shape the configuration of the Earth, from core to crust. Prerequisite EASC1106 EASC2112 Earth systems (6 credits) To provide students who have a fundamental background of Earth Sciences with a more in depth appreciation of the Earth System and the interfaces between its component parts, in order that they might appreciate how informed decisions can be made on the future exploitation and preservation of the planet. To provide a forum for discussion of global issues facing earth scientists. Prerequisite Nil EASC2113 Sedimentology (6 credits) The course deals with sedimentary rocks and processes, and facies models pertaining to various depositional environments. Prerequisite 1) EASC1106; and 2) EASC0105 EASC2124 Geological maps and air photographs * (6 credits) This field and class-based course introduces basic field and mapping techniques and the use of geological equipment, and presents an overview of the geology of Hong Kong and vicinity. Prerequisite EASC0105 or EASC0118 or EASC0119 * Offered from 2008-2009. EASC2125 Global tectonics * (6 credits) This course is intended to provide students with an understanding of the driving forces of Earth processes and the global outcome of these processes through an examination of direct and indirect observations, the evolution of hypotheses, and critical thinking. Prerequisite EASC0105 or EASC0118 or EASC0119 * Offered from 2008-2009. EASC2126 Mineralogy and geochemistry * (6 credits) To provide a coverage of mineralogical principles: as a basis for understanding the petrography of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. 248 Prerequisite EASC0105 or EASC0118 or EASC0119 * Offered from 2008-2009. EASC2127 Global change: anthropogenic impact * (6 credits) This course will explore the role of humans in global change and the environmental responses to such changes. It will also take a look at human evolution and migration from a paleoenvironmental perspective. Prerequisite EASC0121, EASC0105 and EASC0118 or EASC0120 * Offered from 2008-2009. EASC2128 Earth-ocean-atmosphere interactions * (6 credits) To examine the complex interactions between geosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. Prerequisite EASC0121, EASC0105 and EASC0118 or EASC0120 * Offered from 2009-2010. EASC2129 Physical oceanography * (6 credits) To investigate oceans and their dynamics and the processes, which have shaped them. Ocean composition and movement, waves, tides, beaches, interactions with the atmosphere and human exploitation of the non-living resources. To demonstrate how various physical elements of the marine environment interrelate to help form the complex system we know as the world's oceans. Prerequisite EASC0121, EASC0105 and EASC0118 or EASC0120 * Offered from 2008-2009. EASC2130 Earth observation and remote sensing * (6 credits) This course will provide an introduction to the theory and techniques of remote sensing and GIS in Earth and Planetary Observation. This course introduces the theory and techniques of remote sensing and their application to environmental analysis. Remote sensing deals with the acquisition of information using techniques that do not require actual contact with the object or area being observed. Examples of remotely sensed data include aerial photography, infrared thermometry, and passive microwave sensing. Prerequisite EASC0121, EASC0105 and EASC0118 or EASC0120 * Offered from 2009-2010. EASC2131 A cool world: ice ages and climate change * (6 credits) This course set out to provide students with an understanding of how dynamics Earth is and how it has changed over the past 2.5 million years. Prerequisite EASC0121, EASC0105 and EASC0118 or EASC0120 * Offered from 2008-2009. EASC2201 Hydrogeology (6 credits) To study the role of ground water in subsurface geological process and its environmental and geotechnical importance. 249 Prerequisite EASC0116 or EASC1107 EASC2301 Field camps (6 credits) The aims of a geological field camp are to provide 1) essential training and experience in geological mapping techniques and 2) opportunities to study at first-hand areas of particular geological interest and importance, especially outside Hong Kong. Prerequisite Students must have completed at least 42 credits of Earth Sciences courses at the time of taking the second year camp. EASC2307 Directed studies in earth sciences (6 credits) To enhance the student's knowledge of a particular topic and the student's self-directed learning and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite Major in Earth Sciences and at least 18 credits of introductory-level courses in Earth Sciences, and consent of Major Coordinator. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or above. EASC3114 Earth resources and environments (6 credits) To study the range of earth materials that are commercial and exploitable, and the processes that lead to their formation. To consider economic, political and environmental aspects of mineral exploitation. Prerequisite EASC2109 Co-requisite EASC2109 EASC3115 Regional geology and tectonics (6 credits) To cover the tectonic evolution of mainland East Asia and SE Asia, with a specific focus on the geology of Hong Kong. Prerequisite EASC2110 EASC3132 Earth resources * (6 credits) To study the range of earth materials that are commercial and exploitable, and the processes that lead to their formation. To consider economic, political and environmental aspects of mineral exploitation. Prerequisite EASC0105 or EASC0118 or EASC0119 or EASC2109 Co-requisite EASC2109 * Offered from 2008-2009. EASC3133 Applied geochemistry * (6 credits) Prerequisite EASC0105 or EASC0118 or EASC0119 * Offered from 2009-2010. EASC3134 Regional geology * (6 credits) 250 To cover the tectonic evolution of mainland East Asia and SE Asia, with a specific focus on the geology of Hong Kong. Prerequisite EASC0105 or EASC0118 or EASC0119 or EASC2110 * Offered from 2008-2009. EASC3202 Soil and rock mechanics (6 credits) To provide a basic knowledge of soil and rock mechanics for those wishing to consider further studies on a career in engineering geology/geotechnics. Prerequisite EASC2201 EASC3203 Engineering geology (6 credits) Introduction to the applications of geological data, techniques and principles to the study of natural materials (rock, soil and subsurface fluids), and the features and processes affecting the planning of land-use, and the planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance of engineering structures. Prerequisite EASC2201 Co-requisite EASC3202 EASC3302 Advanced topics in geosciences * (6 credits) To provide students with insights into current issues in geosciences, and options to specialize in particular subject areas. Prerequisite Students must have completed at least 36 credits of advanced Earth Sciences courses. * Not offered in 2007-2008. EASC3304 Applied geosciences (6 credits) To provide students with insights in the applied fields of geosciences and allow students to acquire technical skills and training in particular field and instrumental techniques in geology, geophysics, and geochemistry. Prerequisite Students must have completed at least 36 credits of advanced Earth Sciences courses. EASC3308 Earth sciences project (12 credits) To enhance the student's knowledge, ability and interest in advanced studies in the Earth Sciences by providing the student with an opportunity to be engaged in an advanced research project. Prerequisite Major in Earth Sciences and at least 18 credits on advanced-level courses in Earth Sciences, and consent of Major Coordinator. Students must have a GPA of 3.0 or above. Department of Mathematics MATH0011 Numbers and patterns in nature and life (3 credits) To explore the underlying mathematical structure in various topics in life and environmental sciences. Students from all disciplines will gain appreciation of mathematics as a potent tool for investigating and understanding nature and life. 251 Prerequisite HKCEE Mathematics MATH0201 Basic calculus * (6 credits) To provide students with a basic background of calculus that can be applied in various disciplines, aiming at students not having done much mathematics beyond HKCEE mathematics. It can be followed by MATH1804 (University Mathematics A). Students with good grades in this course can also consider taking MATH1805 (University Mathematics B) or MATH1211 (Multivariable Calculus) as follow up. Prerequisite HKCEE Mathematics. Students with HKCEE Additional Mathematics or AS Mathematics and Statistics or equivalent or mathematics at a higher level are not allowed to take this course. * Students having passed MATH0801 are not allowed to take this course. MATH1001 Fundamental concepts of mathematics * (6 credits) To provide students with solid background on fundamental concepts of mathematics and methods of mathematical proofs. Such concepts and methods are important for subsequent studies in all higher level courses in mathematics. This course can be followed by (or taken concurrently with) MATH1111, MATH1211 and other more advanced courses. Prerequisite HKCEE Additional Mathematics or AS Mathematics and Statistics or equivalent. Students with good grades in HKCEE Mathematics and have strong interests in mathematics may also apply. * Students having passed MATH1101 and MATH1201 are not allowed to take this course. MATH1111 Linear algebra * (6 credits) Linear algebra has wide applications to diverse areas in natural science, engineering, management, and social science. This course provides students an introduction to the theory and techniques of linear algebra. It is a foundation course for all mathematics students, to be followed by other more advanced courses in mathematics such as MATH2301, MATH 2303. Prerequisite HKCEE Additional Mathematics and AS Mathematics and Statistics, or AL Pure Mathematics, or MATH1804, or equivalent. Students with a good grade in MATH0201 can also apply. * Students having passed MATH1101 and MATH1102 are not allowed to take this course. MATH1211 Multivariable calculus * (6 credits) Students of this course will learn the theory of multivariable calculus in a rather rigorous manner, and learn how to apply the theory to solve practical problems. This is a foundation course for all mathematics students, to be followed by other more advanced courses in mathematics. Prerequisite HKCEE Additional Mathematics and AS Mathematics and Statistics, or AL Pure Mathematics, or MATH1804, or equivalent. Students with a good grade in MATH0201 can also apply. * Students having passed MATH1202 are not allowed to take this course. MATH1804 University mathematics A * (6 credits) To provide students with a more solid background of calculus of one variable and an introduction to calculus of several variables and matrices that can be applied in various disciplines, aiming at students having taken an elementary calculus course. It can be followed by MATH1211 (Multivariable 252 Calculus). Prerequisite HKCEE Additional Mathematics or AS Mathematics and Statistics or MATH0201. Students with AL Pure Mathematics or equivalent, or taking or having passed MATH1805 or MATH1211, are not allowed to take this course. * Students having passed MATH0802 or MATH1811 or MATH1812 are not allowed to take this course. MATH1805 University mathematics B * (6 credits) To provide students with a solid background of calculus of several variables and matrix algebra and an introduction to ordinary differential equations that can be applied in various disciplines. This course can be followed by other more advanced courses in mathematics. Prerequisite HKCEE Additional Mathematics and AS Mathematics and Statistics, or AL Pure Mathematics, or equivalent. Students with a good grade in MATH0201 can also apply. Student taking or having passed MATH1211 or MATH1813 are not allowed to take this course. * Students having passed MATH1202 or MATH1803 or MATH1811 or MATH1812 are not allowed to take this course. MATH1813 Mathematics methods for actuarial science * (6 credits) To provide students with a background of calculus of several variables and matrix algebra and an introduction to ordinary differential equations that can be applied in actuarial science. Prerequisite AL Pure Mathematics or equivalent. Students taking or having passed in MATH1803 or MATH1211 or MATH1805 are not allowed to take this course. * Students having passed MATH1202 or MATH1803 are not allowed to take this course. MATH2000 Intermediate mathematics project (6 credits) This course is designed for student who would like to take an early experience on independent study. It provides the student with the opportunity to do a small mathematics project close to research in nature independently. Prerequisite MATH1101, MATH1102, MATH1201, MATH1202 Co-requisite MATH2301 and MATH2401 MATH2001 (1) (2) Development of mathematical ideas (6 credits) To acquaint the students with the origin and growth of basic mathematical concepts. To assist the students to gain a deeper insight and broader view of mathematics as a discipline and human endeavour. (3) To provide the students with an opportunity to write on and talk about mathematics, and to engage in independent study. Prerequisite MATH1101 and MATH1102 and MATH1201 and MATH1202 MATH2002 Mathematics seminar * (6 credits) This is a seminar style course intended for those who have very strong interests and good ability in mathematics. Students will be given book chapters and elementary research articles for private study and then make presentations in front of the whole class. Individual meetings with the instructors will be arranged prior to their presentations. Active participation in all the discussions is expected. The aim of the course is to let students learn how to initiate self/independent study in mathematics. 253 Prerequisite MATH1001, MATH1111 and MATH1211 (one of MATH1111 and MATH1211 can be co-requisite). Enrollment needs instructors' approval. * This course is for first year BSc students only. MATH2201 Introduction to mathematical analysis * (6 credits) Prerequisite MATH1101 and MATH1102 and MATH1201 and MATH1202 * Not offered in 2007-2008. MATH2301 Algebra I (6 credits) This course aims to present those fundamental topics and techniques of algebra that are finding wide applications in mathematics and the applied sciences. It is complete in itself, and may also be followed by Algebra II and Topics in Applied Discrete Mathematics. Prerequisite 1) (Two out of MATH1101, MATH1102, MATH1201, MATH1202, one of which should be MATH1102); or 2) (MATH1811/MATH1812 or MATH1803); or 3) (MATH1801/MATH1802 or MATH1807) MATH2303 Matrix theory and its applications (6 credits) Matrix theory has a close connection with other mathematical subjects such as linear algebra, functional analysis, and combinatorics. It also plays an important role in the development of many subjects in science, engineering, and social sciences. In this course, students will be taught the fundamentals of matrix analysis and its application to various kinds of practical problems. Mathematical software will be used in the course, so that students can learn how to use the computer to solve matrix problems. Prerequisite 1) (MATH1101 and MATH1102); or 2) (MATH1811/MATH1812 or MATH1803); or 3) (MATH1801/MATH1802 or MATH1807) MATH2304 Introduction to number theory (6 credits) This course introduces students to the basic knowledge and techniques in number theory. It is hoped that it will stimulate interested students to delve into the rich literature associated with this historically important subject of mathematics. Prerequisite MATH1101 and MATH1201 Co-requisite MATH2301 MATH2401 Analysis I (6 credits) This course extends to more general situations some of the results covered in the first year Mathematics courses, and introduces some further basic concepts which are essential for more advanced studies in mathematical analysis. Prerequisite 1) (MATH1201 and MATH1202); or 2) (MATH1811/MATH1812 or MATH1803); or 3) (MATH1801/MATH1802 or MATH1807) MATH2402 Analysis II (6 credits) This course gives a modern treatment of calculus in several variables which is essential for more advanced studies in analysis. 254 Prerequisite 1) (MATH1201 and MATH1202) and (MATH1101 or MATH1102); or 2) (MATH1811 /MATH1812 or MATH1803); or 3) (MATH1801/MATH1802 or MATH1807) MATH2403 Functions of a complex variable (6 credits) This course is indispensable for studies in higher mathematical analysis and the more theoretical aspects of physics. In this course, the students are introduced to the fundamental concepts and properties of analytic functions and are shown how to look at analyticity from different points of view. At the same time, the techniques of solving problems without losing sight of the geometric picture are emphasized. Prerequisite 1) (Two out of MATH1101, MATH1102, MATH1201, MATH1202, one of which should be MATH1201 or MATH1202); or 2) (MATH1811/MATH1812 or MATH1803); or 3) (MATH1801/MATH1802 or MATH1807) MATH2405 Differential equations (6 credits) The standard topics in the wide field of differential equations included in this course are of importance to students of mathematics and physical sciences as well. Our emphasis is on principles rather than routine calculations and our approach is a compromise between diversity and depth. Prerequisite 1) (Two out of MATH1101, MATH1102, MATH1201, MATH1202, one of which should be MATH1201 or MATH1202); or 2) (MATH1811/MATH1812 or MATH1803); or 3) (MATH1801/MATH1802 or MATH1807) MATH2600 Discrete mathematics * (6 credits) To introduce students to the basic ideas and techniques of discrete mathematics. Prerequisite Any two of MATH1xxx-level or higher mathematics courses. Students having passed in MATH1800 are not allowed to take this course. * Not offered in 2007-2008. MATH2601 Numerical analysis (6 credits) This course covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of Numerical Analysis. Emphasis will be on basic principles and practical methods of solution, using high speed computers. Prerequisite 1) (Two out of MATH1101, MATH1102, MATH1201, MATH1202, one of which should be MATH1201 or MATH1202) or (MATH1811/MATH1812 or MATH1803) or (MATH1801/MATH1802 or MATH1807); and 2) Knowledge of a programming language MATH2603 Probability theory (6 credits) The emphasis of this course will be on probability models and their applications. The primary aim is to elucidate the fundamental principles of probability theory through examples and to develop the ability of the students to apply what they have learned from this course to widely divergent concrete problems. Prerequisite 1) MATH1201 and MATH1202; or 2) MATH1811 and MATH1812; or 3) MATH1803; or 4) MATH0801 and MATH0802 MATH2901 Operations research I (6 credits) 255 The objective is to provide a fundamental account of the basic results and techniques of Linear Programming and its related topics in Operations Research. There is an equal emphasis on all three aspects of understanding, algorithms and applications. The course serves, together with a course on network models, as essential concept and background for more advanced studies in Operations Research. Prerequisite Two out of MATH1101, MATH1102, MATH1201, MATH1202, one of which should be MATH1101 or MATH1102 MATH2904 Introduction to optimization (6 credits) This course introduces students to the theory and techniques of optimization, aiming at preparing them for further studies in Operations Research, Mathematical Economics and related subject areas. Prerequisite (MATH1101 or MATH1102) and (MATH1201 or MATH1202) MATH2905 Queueing theory and simulation * (6 credits) This course introduces students to the models and theory of queueing system, as well as the technique of simulation as a practical tool of analysis. Prerequisite (STAT1301 or STAT1007) and (MATH1101 or MATH1102) and (MATH1201 or MATH1202) Co-requisite MATH2603 or its equivalent * Not offered in 2007-2008. MATH2906 Financial calculus (6 credits) This course gives an elementary treatment of the modeling of financial derivatives, asset pricing and market risks from an applied mathematician's viewpoint. Stochastic calculus and numerical methods will be introduced. Prerequisite (STAT1301 or STAT1007) and (MATH1101 or MATH1102) and (MATH1201 or MATH1202) Co-requisite MATH2603 or its equivalent MATH2907 Numerical methods for financial calculus * (6 credits) This course is aimed at providing effective numerical methods as well as their theoretical aspect for solving problems arisen from financial derivatives and asset pricing. Prerequisite (MATH1101 or MATH1102) and (MATH1201 or MATH1202) Co-requisite MATH2603 and MATH2906 or their equivalent * Not offered in 2007-2008. MATH2999 Directed studies in mathematics * (6 credits) To provide the student with an experience of independent study on a particular mathematics topic or working on a small scale mathematics project. Prerequisite Major in Mathematics and at least 18 credits on introductory-level courses in Mathematics, and consent of Major Coordinator. Additional prerequisite may be required, depending on the topic of the study. * Offered from 2008-2009. 256 MATH3000 Mathematics project (6 credits) The object is to provide a student with an opportunity to formulate and investigate, in depth, a problem of practical interest and/or have a foretaste of mathematical research. The work, to be done on an individual basis, is considered a highly desirable part of the training of a mathematician. Prerequisite MATH1101 and MATH1102 and MATH1201 and MATH1202 and MATH2301 and MATH2401 MATH3302 Algebra II (6 credits) This course is an extension of Algebra I and goes deeper into the various topics treated in that course. Together, the two courses are complete in themselves, and may be followed by Topics in Algebra and Topics in Applied Discrete Mathematics. Prerequisite MATH2301 MATH3310 Topics in algebra * (6 credits) To provide students specializing in mathematics with the opportunity to study some topics in algebra in greater depth. Prerequisite MATH1101 and MATH1102 and MATH1201 and MATH1202 and MATH2301 * Not offered from 2007-2008. MATH3404 Functional analysis (6 credits) This course introduces students to the basic knowledge of linear functional analysis, an important branch of modern analysis. Prerequisite MATH1101 and MATH1102 and MATH1201 and MATH1202 and MATH2401 MATH3406 Introduction to partial differential equations (6 credits) This course introduces students to the basic techniques for solving partial differential equations as well as the underlying theories. Prerequisite MATH1101 and MATH1102 and MATH1201 and MATH1202 and MATH2401 Co-requisite MATH2405 MATH3501 Geometry (6 credits) As geometric forms often appear in nature, the study of geometry helps us to understand better the universe in which we live. Moreover, geometry has much intrinsic beauty and the study of it is an excellent training in intuitive thinking. In this course we study the differential geometry of curves and surfaces in 3-space. In the study of regular surfaces in 3-space we exhibit geometric notions that are definable in terms of metrical properties of these surfaces alone, leading to the intrinsic geometry of surfaces. Prerequisite MATH1101 and MATH1102 and MATH1201 and MATH1202 and MATH2401 MATH3502 Geometric topology (6 credits) This course gives a geometric introduction to some of the methods of algebraic topology. The emphasis 257 throughout will be on the geometric motivations and applications of the theory. Prerequisite MATH1101 and MATH1102 and MATH1201 and MATH1202 and MATH2301 and MATH2401 MATH3602 Scientific computing (6 credits) This course introduces mathematical theories and computational techniques for solving various kinds of matrix computation problems that are often encountered in scientific or industrial applications. Prerequisite MATH1101 and MATH1102 and MATH1201 and MATH1202 Co-requisite MATH2601 MATH3610 Topics in applied discrete mathematics * (6 credits) To provide students with the opportunity to study some further topics in applied discrete mathematics. Prerequisite MATH1800 and MATH2301 * Not offered from 2007-2008. MATH3902 Operations research II (6 credits) The objective is to provide a fundamental account of the basic results and techniques of Integer Programming (IP), Dynamic Programming (DP) and Markov Decision Processes (MDP) in Operations Research. There is emphasis on aspects of algorithms as well as applications. The course serves, together with courses on linear programming and network models, to provide essential optimization concept and algorithms for more advanced studies in Operations Research. Prerequisite Two out of MATH1101, MATH1102, MATH1201, MATH1202, one of which should be MATH1101 or MATH1102 Co-requisite MATH2901 MATH3903 Network models in operations research (6 credits) The objective is to provide a fundamental account of the basic results and techniques of network models in Operations Research. There is an equal emphasis on all three aspects of understanding, algorithms and applications. The course serves, together with a course on linear programming, to provide essential concept and background for more advanced studies in Operations Research. Prerequisite Two out of MATH1101, MATH1102, MATH1201, MATH1202, one of which should be MATH1101 or MATH1102 Co-requisite MATH2901 MATH3910 Topics in mathematical programming & optimization (6 credits) A study in greater depth of some special topics in mathematical programming or optimization. It is mainly intended for students in Operations Research or related subject areas. Prerequisite MATH2901 and MATH2904 MATH3999 Mathematics project * (12 credits) To provide the student with an opportunity to formulate and investigate in depth a mathematical problem or topic, so as to give the student a foretaste of mathematical research. The work, to be done on 258 an individual basis, is considered a highly desirable part of the training of a mathematician. Prerequisite Major in Mathematics and at least 24 credits on advanced-level courses in Mathematics, and consent of Major Coordinator. Additional prerequisite may be required, depending on the topic of the project. * Offered from 2009-2010. Department of Pharmacology PHAR3001 Clinical pharmacology I (3 credits) This course presents the fundamental principles in pharmacology and relevant knowledge pertaining to drugs in common use. It will provide an understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics which is essential for administering and managing drug therapy. The therapeutic effects and mechanisms of action of the drugs most frequently prescribed will be covered. Prerequisite Preferably CHEM3405 and CHEM3407 Co-requisite Preferably CHEM3405 and CHEM3407 PHAR3002 Clinical pharmacology II (3 credits) This course presents the fundamental principles in pharmacology and relevant knowledge pertaining to drugs in common use. It will provide an understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics which is essential for administering and managing drug therapy. The therapeutic effects and mechanisms of action of the drugs most frequently prescribed will be covered. Prerequisite Preferably CHEM3405 and CHEM3407 Co-requisite Preferably CHEM3405 and CHEM3407 Department of Physics PHYS0001 Nature of the universe I: introduction to observational astronomy and the solar system * (3 credits) This general education course is designed as an elective for students in all disciplines and all years. No prior knowledge in astronomy, physics, and higher mathematics is required. Prerequisite Nil * Not available to those who have taken YSCN0009 unless approved by course coordinator. PHYS0002 Nature of the universe II: stars, galaxies and cosmology for beginners (3 credits) This general education course is designed as an elective for students in all disciplines and all years. It focuses on the theoretical aspect of astronomy. No prior knowledge in astronomy, physics, or higher mathematics is required. Prerequisite Nil PHYS0114 Fundamental physics I * (6 credits) This course, together with Fundamental Physics II, aims at providing students who are interested in physics, or taking a minor option in physics, a first course in general physics. It covers the essential knowledge of physics on various topics. Students who have taken the course can have a smooth link-up with other courses offered in the Physics Department. Prerequisite HKCEE Physics/Engineering Science (students with AL/AS Physics or AL 259 Engineering Science should first obtain approval from the course selection advisor) * Not available to those who have taken or are concurrently taking PHYS1111, PHYS1112, PHYS1113, or PHYS1314 unless approved by course selection advisor. Not available to students who have taken HKU-SPACE course College Physics I. PHYS0115 Fundamental physics II * (6 credits) This course, together with Fundamental Physics I, aims at providing students who are interested in physics, or taking a minor option in physics, a first course in general physics. It covers the essential knowledge of physics various topics. Students who have taken the course can have a smooth link-up with other courses offered in the Physics Department. Prerequisite HKCEE Physics/Engineering Science (students with AL/AS Physics or AL Engineering Science should obtain first approval from the course selection advisor) * Not available to those who have taken or are concurrently taking PHYS1111, PHYS1112, PHYS1113, or PHYS1314 unless approved by course selection advisor. Not available to students who have taken HKU-SPACE course College Physics II. PHYS0601 God, the big bang and Stephen Hawking I * (3 credits) This course, named after a recently published book by David Wilkinson, is for both science and non-science students to recognize the absence of any real conflict between science and religion. This course (part I) deals with religion and its interactions with cosmology. Prerequisite Nil * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS0602 Science or fiction? * (3 credits) The course is designed as an exploration of the various way in which science, particularly physics, has been used in the creation of the literary genre known as science fiction. One of its main purposes is to provide students with experience in expressing their ideas and opinions in written and spoken form and in developing their analytical and creative powers. Prerequisite Nil * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS0603 Art & physics * (3 credits) The course is aimed at artistically inclined students who would like to know more about the New Physics, scientifically inclined students who would like to have a framework to appreciate Art, and anyone who is fascinated by both. Prerequisite Nil * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS0605 Nuclear energy and the environment (3 credits) To introduce the use of nuclear power and its impact to our environment; and to arouse an awareness of the safety use of nuclear energy. Prerequisite Nil PHYS0607 Revealing the magic in everyday life * (3 credits) 260 The course is designed for students who are curious about science in daily life. Students taking this course should have basic training in physics in the certificate level. The course covers the working principles and mechanisms of the things and phenomena around us. Logical thinking and appreciation of science are emphasized with mathematics kept at a minimum. Students are trained to develop scientific intuition and to appreciate that many things in everyday life are not purely magical but can also be predictable. Prerequisite HKCEE Physics * Not available to students who have taken YSCN0018 or the HKU-SPACE course "The Science of Everyday Life". PHYS0608 Kitchen science: kitchen mysteries revealed (3 credits) The course aims to develop students' critical thinking skills and broaden their basic science knowledge by exploring the science behind the common daily life activity of cooking. Basic physical and chemical concepts necessary to understand food preparation, as illustrated by recipes from cuisines from different regions, will be introduced. Prerequisite Nil PHYS0610 Weather today (3 credits) To introduce the phenomena and mechanisms of the atmosphere, including typhoons, tornadoes, El Nino and La Nina. This course is designed to be an elementary introduction of weather and climate. It is suitable for any students with interest in the subject. Prerequisite Nil PHYS0611 Magic of flight (3 credits) The course aims to provide introduction of the basic principles of flight and encourage integration of knowledge from different disciplines by comparing the biological and technological achievements of flight. Prerequisite Nil PHYS0625 Physics by inquiry (6 credits) This course aims at providing students a solid background and knowledge in physics and its connection with our daily life phenomena and activities. Prerequisite HKCEE Physics (Students without HKCEE Physics should obtain approval from Course Coordinator before choosing this course) PHYS1303 Special relativity I (3 credits) This course is designed as an elective for students in all disciplines and all years with science background. Prerequisite 1 AL/AS in any science subject PHYS1315 Methods in physics I * (6 credits) This course provides students with experience in using mathematical tools and techniques to solve 261 problems in physics. It is complete in itself, or may also be followed by Methods in Physics II. Prerequisite AL Pure Mathematics or AS Mathematics & Statistics or HKCEE Additional Mathematics * Not available to students who have taken / are taking MATH1811 or MATH1812 unless approved by course coordinator. PHYS1316 Methods in physics II * (6 credits) This course provides students with experience in using mathematical tools and techniques to solve problems in physics. It is complete in itself, or may also be taken after Methods in Physics I. Prerequisite AL Pure Mathematics or AS Mathematics & Statistics or HKCEE Additional Mathematics * Not available to students who have taken / are taking MATH1811 or MATH1812 unless approved by course coordinator. PHYS1411 Introductory experimental physics * (6 credits) An experimental course designed to provide students with experience in laboratory techniques and instrumentations. Prerequisite AL/AS Physics or AL Engineering Science * Not available to those who have taken PHYS0411 unless approved by course coordinator. PHYS1412 Electronics (6 credits) This course is designed to provide students with a broad knowledge of the theoretical background and experimental application of modern electronic devices and circuitry. Prerequisite AL/AS Physics or AL Engineering Science PHYS1413 Physics in a nutshell * (6 credits) This course covers the essential topics in physics in one semester. It serves as a first course to students who are interested in physics or those who are planning to take physics as a minor. The conceptual ideas are emphasized and the mathematical treatment is moderate. Prerequisite AS/AL Physics or Engineering Science * Not available to those who have taken or concurrently taking PHYS1414, PHYS1415, PHYS0114, PHYS0115, PHYS1111, PHYS1112 or PHYS1113 unless approved by course selection advisor. Not available to students who have taken HKU-SPACE course College Physics I or II. PHYS1414 General physics I * (6 credits) This course is the first of a two-course series designed to offer a comprehensive training of physics covering all the major building blocks of the physical laws governing nature, including mechanics, oscillation and waves, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomics physics. Prerequisite 1) HKCEE Additional Mathematics or AS Mathematics & Statistics or AL Pure Mathematics; and 2) AL/AS Physics or Engineering Science * Not available to those who have taken or are concurrently taking PHYS1111, PHYS1112, PHYS1113 or PHYS1314 unless approved by course selection advisor. 262 PHYS1415 General physics II * (6 credits) This course is the second of a two-course series designed to offer a comprehensive training of physics covering all the major building blocks of the physical laws governing nature, including mechanics, oscillation and waves, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomics physics. Prerequisite 1) HKCEE Additional Mathematics or AS Mathematics & Statistics or AL Pure Mathematics; and 2) AL/AS Physics or Engineering Science * Not available to those who have taken or are concurrently taking PHYS1111, PHYS1112, PHYS1113 or PHYS1314 unless approved by course selection advisor. PHYS2021 The physical universe (6 credits) To appreciate the underlying physical principles of astronomy. This course is designed as an elective for second or third year students with some basic science knowledge. Prerequisite PHYS0001 or YSCN0009 PHYS2022 Observational astronomy (6 credits) To introduce the students to the techniques and methods of contemporary astronomy, with emphasis on the data reduction and analysis. Prerequisite Any 1st year science or engineering course PHYS2023 Stellar physics (6 credits) This course introduces the basic theory of stellar structure and evolution. It follows a mathematical treatment that stress on the underlying physical processes. This course is calculus-based. A good background in first year level classical mechanics and electromagnetism is recommended. Prerequisite PHYS1111 or PHYS1314 PHYS2024 Introduction to cosmology * (6 credits) The aim of the course is to offer an introduction to the key ideas in observational and theoretical cosmology, to familiarize students with the main observational results on which modern cosmology is based and to introduce, at an elementary level, the basic physical principles used to model the evolution and dynamics of the universe from the big bang to the present epoch. Prerequisite PHYS1111 or PHYS1314 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS2221 Introductory solid state physics (6 credits) To provides a broad introduction to modern theories of the behaviour and properties of the solid state of matter. It is designed as a self-contained course which at the same time will serve as a basis for more advanced courses and projects in solid state physics. Prerequisite PHYS1314 PHYS2222 Waves and optics (6 credits) To give a coherent introduction to the development of modern physical optics, with particular attention 263 to the wave properties and quantum theories of light. Prerequisite PHYS1112 and PHYS1113 PHYS2224 Computational modelling of physical systems * (6 credits) The aim of this course is to introduce the students to handling data (obtained either from physics experiements or physical models) and computational methods for modelling physical systems. Prerequisite 1) Any 1st year physics course; and 2) CSIS0911 or CSIS1117 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS2225 Solid state devices * (6 credits) The aim of this course is to give an introduction to the physics and operating principles of commonly used solid state devices. Prerequisite PHYS1314 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS2227 Laser & spectroscopy (6 credits) The aim of this course is to provide a broad introduction to modern laser spectroscopic techniques and selected applications. Prerequisite PHYS1314 and PHYS2222 and PHYS2323 PHYS2228 Introductory health physics (6 credits) This course aims at providing students with basic knowledge in the scientific and engineering aspects of health physics and to arouse students' interest in the area of peaceful application of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations. Prerequisite PHYS0605 or PHYS1314 PHYS2229 Thin film physics * (6 credits) This course is intended for the advanced students, covering the basic theories and techniques of physical deposition processes and topics related to a very rapidly growing area - thin film application in material science. Prerequisite PHYS1111 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS2234 Sensors and computer control for physical measurements * (6 credits) The aim of this course is to introduce students to basic principles of measurement and control, and sensors for measurement of different physical quantities (temperature, pressure etc.), as well as provide students with practical skills for designing and operating computer controlled measurement systems. Prerequisite Any 1st year science or engineering course * Not offered in 2007-2008. 264 PHYS2235 Physics of namomaterails * (6 credits) Physics of Nanomaterials is a course for advanced undergraduate and beginning postgraduate students at HKU. The course is designed to introduce important concepts such as quantum size effect and fundamental physics of nanomaterials. Prerequisite PHYS1314 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS2304 Special relativity II * (3 credits) This is a follow up course to PHYS1313, with the aim of providing an introduction to the advanced aspects of the theory of special relativity and of its applications. Prerequisite PHYS1303 or PHYS1314 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS2321 Introductory electromagnetism (6 credits) Introduces the physical concepts required for an understanding of electricity and magnetism. A foundation course for students majoring in physics. Prerequisite PHYS1111, PHYS1112 and PHYS1314 Co-requisite PHYS1113 PHYS2322 Statistical mechanics and thermodynamics (6 credits) An introduction to Statistical Mechanics and elementary Thermodynamics with reference to related phenomena in Physics. This course is taught as a basic and essential subject for students majoring in Physics. Prerequisite PHYS1111, PHYS1112 and PHYS1314 Co-requisite PHYS1113 PHYS2323 Introductory quantum mechanics (6 credits) This course aims at a rigorous introduction to the concepts and methods of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. It is a prerequisite for several advanced physics courses. Prerequisite PHYS1314 PHYS2324 Classical mechanics (6 credits) The aim of this course is to introduce general methods of studying the dynamics of particle systems, through which students can acquire experience in using mathematical techniques for solving practical problems. Prerequisite PHYS1111, PHYS1112 and PHYS1314 Co-requisite PHYS1113 PHYS2325 Theoretical physics (6 credits) The aim of this course is to provide students with the conceptual skills and analytical tools necessary for solving real problems in all major areas of physics. 265 Prerequisite 1) PHYS1111 or PHYS1112 or PHYS1113 or PHYS1314; and 2) and MATH1812) or (PHYS1315 and PHYS1316) (MATH1811 PHYS2426 Intermediate experimental physics * (6 credits) This laboratory based course aims to familiarize students with some basic methods in physics experimentation, and in particular to illustrate the methods by carrying experiments related to electromagnetism and modern physics. Prerequisite PHYS1411 and PHYS1314 * Not available to those who have taken PHYS2421 or PHYS2422 unless approved by course coordinator. PHYS2523 Directed studies in physics (6 credits) This course is designed for second year students who would like to take an early experience on research. It provides students with the opportunity to do small physics projects by themselves, either theoretical or experimental. These projects are close to research in nature and, usually, without lectures. Prerequisite Any 1st year Physics course PHYS2624 Introductory atmospheric physics * (6 credits) To discuss the physical principles and mechanisms of atmospheric motions, weather phenomena, and climate. This course is designed to be an intermediate level course on modern meteorology. It is suitable for students with some background in physics or science. Prerequisite Any 1st year science or engineering course * Course materials will be delivered by expert guest lecturers from the Hong Kong Observatory. PHYS2626 Introductory classical mechanics * (6 credits) This course aims at providing students a solid foundation in classical Newtonian mechanics with rigorous mathematical treatments. Students are expected to have good working knowledge of calculus and vectors. Prerequisite PHYS1413 or PHYS1414 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS2627 Introductory quantum physics * (6 credits) This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the concepts and ideas related to study of physics in the microscopic scale which revolutionize our understanding of the properties of light and matter in the universe. Prerequisite PHYS1413 or PHYS1414 or PHYS1415 * Not available to those who have taken PHYS1314 unless approved by course coordinator. PHYS3031 Astrophysics (6 credits) To introduce students to current theories in astrophysics. It may be taken as a self-contained course or as background to research work in astrophysics. Prerequisite PHYS2321 and PHYS2322 and PHYS2323 266 PHYS3033 General relativity (6 credits) To introduce students to the field of general relativity and to provide conceptual skills and analytical tools necessary for astrophysical and cosmological applications of the theory Prerequisite PHYS2321 and PHYS2322 and PHYS2323 Co-requisite PHYS1303 PHYS3034 Cosmology * (6 credits) The aim of the course is to offer an advanced introduction to cosmology, to familiarize students with mathematical formulation used to model the evolution and dynamics of the universe, and to provide an up to date discussion of the big bang theory and structure and galaxy formation. Prerequisite PHYS2321 and PHYS2322 and PHYS2323 and PHYS2024 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS3035 Stellar atmospheres * (6 credits) This course is designed to provide students with the basic understanding of the interaction between radiation and matter, and the physics required to interpret modern astronomical observations. Prerequisite PHYS2627 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS3036 Interstellar medium * (6 credits) This course is designed to provide students with the fundamentals of gas dynamics, molecular and solid-state physics with applications to the structure of the interstellar medium. Prerequisite PHYS2627 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS3037 Selected topics in astrophysics * (6 credits) To introduce students some current topics in astrophysics. It may be taken as a self-contained course or as background to research work in astrophysics. Prerequisite PHYS2627 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS3038 Planetary science * (6 credits) This course is designed to provide students with a modern understanding of the structure of the solar system and their effects on the evolution of the Earth. Prerequisite PHYS2627 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS3231 Computational physics (6 credits) 267 The aim of the course is to show how the power of computers enables a computational approach to solving physics problems to be adopted, which is distinct from, and complimentary to, traditional experimental and theoretical approaches. The material covered will be found useful in any project or problem solving work that contains a strong computational or data analysis element. Prerequisite PHYS2321 and PHYS2322 and PHYS2323 PHYS3232 Solid state physics *(6 credits) To provide students with an understanding of more advanced topics in selected areas of solid state physics. Prerequisite PHYS2221 and PHYS2321 and PHYS2322 and PHYS2323 * Not offered in 2007-2008. PHYS3321 Nuclear and particle physics * (6 credits) The aim of the course is to describe nuclear structure in an elementary way as a field of application of quantum mechanics and electromagnetism, and to study the fundamental interactions of submuclear particles. Prerequisite PHYS2323 and PHYS2321 and PHYS2322 * Not available to those who have taken PHYS2326 unless approved by course coordinator. PHYS3331 Electromagnetic field theory (6 credits) We study the electromagnetic properties of simple physical systems, and the relations between electromagnetism and special relativity. Prerequisite PHYS2321 and PHYS2322 and PHYS2323 and PHYS2325 PHYS3332 Quantum mechanics (6 credits) Introduces more advanced concepts of quantum mechanics. Together with PHYS2323, these will provide the basic knowledge of quantum mechanics to an undergraduate student. Prerequisite PHYS2321 and PHYS2322 and PHYS2323 and PHYS2325 PHYS3333 Advanced statistical mechanics (6 credits) This course intends to introduce some topics in the field of equilibrium statistical physics. Prerequisite PHYS2321 and PHYS2322 and PHYS2323 PHYS3334 Advanced electromagnetic field theory (6 credits) This is a standard course in electromagnetic field theory which provides essential background for postgraduate and advanced undergraduate students intend to do research in physics. Prerequisite PHYS2321 and PHYS3331 PHYS3335 Advanced quantum mechanics (6 credits) 268 This course introduces postgraduate and advanced undergraduate students to advanced techniques in quantum mechanics and their applications to selected topics in physics. Prerequisite PHYS2323 and PHYS3332 PHYS3431 Advanced experimental physics * (6 credits) This course aims to introduce the student to some of the more advanced techniques in modern physics, while at the same time illustrating some of the important experiments discussed in course text books. Prerequisite 1) PHYS2421 or PHYS2422 or PHYS2426; and 2) PHYS2321 and PHYS2322 and PHYS2323 * Not available to those who have taken PHYS2423 unless approved by course coordinator. PHYS3531 Physics project (12 credits) This course is designed for students who are considering doing research in the future. It provides students with the opportunity to study special physics projects by themselves, either theoretical or experimental. These projects are close to research in nature and are designed for prospective research students. Prerequisite 1) PHYS2321; and 2) PHYS2323 PHYS3532 Special topics in physics (12 credits) To provide the chance for students to learn special topics in modern physics by themselves by reviewing literature (theoretical project) or practicing special experimental skills in carrying out a small project (experimental project) under the supervision of a member of staff. Prerequisite 1) PHYS2321; and 2) PHYS2323 Department of Statistics & Actuarial Science STAT0301 Elementary statistical methods (6 credits) Research findings are often fully or partly supported by data. Data, which are often concerned with situations involving variability and uncertainty, are collected from an experiment or a survey. They are used to estimate the true value of a certain quantity or to test the acceptability of a certain new hypothesis. Valid methods of analysing the data are thus essential to any successful investigation. The course presents the fundamentals of statistical methods widely used by researchers. There is no demand of sophisticated technical mathematics. Prerequisite HKCEE Mathematics. Not available to students with a pass in A-level Pure Mathematics. (Students taking or having taken STAT1301 or STAT1306 or STAT0302 or STAT1000 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT1801 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 or ECON1003 are not allowed to take this course.) STAT0302 Business statistics * (6 credits) The discipline of statistics is concerned with situations involving uncertainty and variability. Variability greatly affects the interpretation of data. Thus statistics forms an important descriptive and analytical tool. This elementary course, which is taught without any technical mathematics, presents many standard situations of data interpretation with emphases on business examples. The statistical tests for these situations are presented. Microsoft Excel might be used to carry out some statistical analysis. 269 Prerequisite HKCEE Mathematics (Students taking or having taken STAT1301 or STAT1306 or STAT0301 or STAT1000 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT1801 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 or ECON1003 are not allowed to take this course.) * Available only to Business School students. STAT1301 Probability & statistics I (6 credits) The discipline of statistics is concerned with situations in which uncertainty and variability play an essential role and forms an important descriptive and analytical tool in many practical problems. Against a background of motivating problems this course develops relevant probability models for the description of such uncertainty and variability and provides an introduction to the concepts, principles and methodology of statistical analysis. Prerequisite 1) For students admitted in 2006 or before - A-level Pure Mathematics or AS-level Mathematics & Statistics or equivalent. (Students taking or having taken STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1306 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT1801 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 are not allowed to take this course.); and 2) For students admitted in 2007 or thereafter - A-level Pure Mathematics or AS-level Mathematics & Statistics or STAT0302 or (students taking or having taken STAT0301). (Students taking or having taken STAT1306 or STAT1801 are not allowed to take this course.) STAT1302 Probability & statistics II (6 credits) This course builds on STAT1301, introducing further the concepts and methods of statistics. Emphasis is on the two major areas of statistical analysis: estimation and hypothesis testing. Through the disciplines of statistical modelling, inference and decision making, students will be equipped with both quantitative skills and qualitative perceptions essential for making rigorous statistical analysis of real-life data. Prerequisite A-level Pure Mathematics or AS-level Mathematics & Statistics or equivalent AND taking or having taken STAT1301 or STAT1000 or STAT1007 or STAT0601 STAT1303 Data management (6 credits) This course is designed for students who want to learn a statistical software (SAS or SPSS) for data management and elementary data analysis. This course focuses on using SAS or SPSS to manage data set input and output, work with different data types, manipulate and transform data, perform random sampling and descriptive data analysis, and create summary reports. Prerequisite HKCEE Mathematics or AS-level Mathematics & Statistics or A-level Pure Mathematics or equivalent AND taking or having taken STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1301 or STAT1306 or ECON1003 or ECOL2006 or STAT1000 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT2001 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 or STAT1801 STAT1304 The analysis of sample surveys (6 credits) We often try to infer the characteristics of a population by taking a sample from that population. The validity and the efficiency of the findings depend on the quality of the sample. This course considers the basic theory and practical applications for the different sampling design and analysis. Examples on marketing surveys, social surveys and opinion polls will be considered. Prerequisite HKCEE Mathematics or AS-level Mathematics & Statistics or A-level Pure 270 Mathematics or equivalent AND taking or having taken STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1301 or STAT1306 or STAT1801 or ECON1003 or ECOL2006 or STAT1000 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT2001 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 STAT1305 Introduction to demography (6 credits) Demography studies the distribution of population by age, gender, marital status, education level, culture, ethnicity, and other social and physical characteristics. It also focuses on population changes---migration, fertility and mortality rates. Knowledge in demography is vital to economic studies, business and government policymaking and investment planning. The course introduces important statistical methods pertinent to the study of demography, with attention to problems of regional interest. Prerequisite HKCEE Mathematics or AS-level Mathematics & Statistics or A-level Pure Mathematics or equivalent AND taking or having taken STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1301 or STAT1306 or ECON1003 or ECOL2006 or STAT1000 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT2001 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 or STAT1801 STAT1306 Introductory statistics (6 credits) The discipline of statistics is concerned with situations involving uncertainty and variability. The interpretation of data needs special techniques when variability plays a role, as it usually does. Thus statistics forms an important descriptive and analytical tool of many scientific disciplines. Candidates with a mathematical background will find this course suitable, because the language of mathematics allows the subject of statistics to be presented with economy and clarity. Prerequisite A-level Pure Mathematics or AS-level Mathematics & Statistics or MATH0801 or MATH0802. Students without these qualifications, but with grade C or better in A-level Physics, are deemed to have sufficient mathematical training to enrol in this course. Students who intend to major in "Risk Management" or "Statistics" should take STAT1301 instead of this course. (Students taking or having taken STAT1301 or STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1801 or ECON1003 are not allowed to take this course.) STAT1801 Probability and statistics: foundations of actuarial science (6 credits) This course provides the basic foundations in probability and statistics for students in B.Sc.(ActuarSc), though the course is also suitable for mathematically-able students from other quantitative curricula. Probability theory underpins the study of statistics. The course aims firstly to develop skills in probabilistic analysis for problems involving randomness. Random variables and probability distributions are studied in depth, such as discrete and continuous distributions, conditional probability, conditional expectation, central limit theorem. The concepts of statistics are then introduced, guided by motivating examples. Prerequisite A-Level Pure Mathematics or AS-level Mathematics & Statistics or equivalent. (Students taking or having taken STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1301 or STAT1306 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 are not allowed to take this course.) STAT1802 Financial mathematics (6 credits) 271 This course introduces the mathematics of finance which plays an important role in the development of basic actuarial techniques. Introduction to risk management and practical applications of the actuarial functions are also covered. Prerequisite A-level Pure Mathematics or AS-level Mathematics & Statistics or equivalent AND taking or having taken STAT1801 or STAT1302 STAT2301 Linear statistical analysis (6 credits) The analysis of variability is mainly concerned with locating the sources of the variability. Many statistical techniques investigate these sources through the use of `linear' models. This course presents the theory and practice of these models. Prerequisite STAT1302 (Students taking or having taken STAT0801 or STAT2804 are not allowed to take this course.) STAT2302 Statistical inference (6 credits) This course covers the advanced theory of point estimation, interval estimation and hypothesis testing. Using a mathematically-oriented approach, the course provides a solid and rigorous treatment of inferential problems, statistical methodologies and the underlying concepts and theory. It is suitable in particular for students intending to further their studies or to develop a career in statistical research. Prerequisite STAT1302 or STAT2802 STAT2303 Probability modelling (6 credits) This is an introductory course in probability modelling. A range of important topics in stochastic processes will be discussed. Prerequisite STAT1301 or STAT1000 or STAT1007 or STAT0601 (Students taking or having taken STAT2803 or MATH2603 are not allowed to take this course.) STAT2304 Design and analysis of experiments (6 credits) In this course the basic theory of experimental design is introduced. Basic principles and guidelines for designing experiments will be introduced. Analysis for experiments with a single factor, Randomised block, Latin squares and related designs will be covered. The notions of crossed and nested factorial structure, balanced incomplete factorial experiments and fixed/random effects will be discussed. Prerequisite STAT1302 or STAT2802 or STAT2311 or STAT0401 or STAT0603 or STAT0100 or STAT0604 or STAT0605 STAT2305 Quality control and management (6 credits) The successful control of quality in production is a matter of primary importance to a company's prosperity and good-will. This course provides an overview of quality compromise which involves both the producer and the consumer. It presents a variety of statistical solutions including control chars, acceptance sampling plans, sequential sampling procedures, analysis of measurement errors, reliability, and life-testing. Contemporary quality management systems such as total quality control, quality control circle, zero defects, six-sigma, and ISO-9000 will be introduced The student is brought to the frontier of today's quality control and management ideas. Prerequisite ECOL2006 or ECON1003 or STAT0301 or STAT1001 or STAT0302 or STAT1301 or STAT1306 or STAT1801 or STAT0100 or STAT2802 or STAT0604 or STAT0605 272 STAT2306 Business logistics (6 credits) Originally, the word `logistics' described the strategic aspects involved in moving and supplying armies and navies. Usage grew to include games of strategy, such as chess. Modern business corporations are increasingly using logistics as a management tool, for example, in capital budgeting problems, production planning, scheduling, transportation or in deciding a location for a new factory. This course addresses the business applications of logistics. Prerequisite ECOL2006 or ECON1003 or STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1301 or STAT1306 or STAT1801 or STAT1000 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT2001 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 (Students taking or having taken MATH2901 are not allowed to take this course.) STAT2307 Statistics in clinical medicine and bio-medical research (6 credits) In clinical medicine doctors observe features (such as blood pressure, hormone level, presence/absence of a symptom, degree of infection, etc.) which are subject to natural variation between individual patients and between groups of patients with different disease types. This variability motivates the application of statistical methodology to the clinical observational and decision-making process. Part of the course deals with these applications. The other part deals with statistical problems which come from biological and medical research, for example the controlled clinical drug trial. No knowledge in biology or medicine is assumed; the course provides all of the necessary bio-medical background when the statistical problems are introduced. Prerequisite STAT1302 or STAT2802 or STAT0100 or STAT0604 or STAT0605 STAT2308 Statistical genetics (6 credits) This course covers background on genetics, Mendelian Genetics; Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; linkage equilibrium; exact test; likelihood ratio test; chi-square test; population structure; linkage analysis; non-parametric linkage analysis; association studies; forensic genetics; relatedness; kinship analysis; mixed samples. Prerequisite STAT1302 or STAT2802 or STAT0100 or STAT0604 or STAT0605 STAT2309 The statistics of investment risk * (6 credits) Most investments involve some risk. The decision to invest or not is usually made against a background of uncertainty. Whilst prediction of the future is difficult, there are statistical modelling techniques which provide a rational framework for investment decisions, particularly those relating to stock markets and the markets for interest rates, commodities and currencies. Building upon research, both in Hong Kong and abroad, this course presents the prevailing statistical theories for investment decisions in these vital markets. Particular issues include the concept of an efficient market, portfolio construction and analysis, asset pricing, portfolio performance and management, and behavioural finance. Prerequisite ECOL2006 or ECON1003 or STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1301 or STAT1306 or STAT1801 or STAT1000 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT2001 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 * Actuarial Science students are not allowed to take this course. STAT2310 Risk management and insurance * (6 credits) 273 The course introduces the statistical, financial and legal principles underlying the techniques for managing the insurable risks faced by organizations and individuals. It is aimed at students who have minimal background in quantitative methods and is not available to students majoring in Actuarial Science. The course emphasizes basic risk management and financial planning, and students will be able to apply these concepts immediately to their own lives. Prerequisite ECOL2006 or ECON1003 or STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1301 or STAT1306 or STAT1801 or STAT1000 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT2001 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 * Actuarial Science students are not allowed to take this course. STAT2311 Computer-aided data analysis (6 credits) A wide range of statistical analyses and methods are presented using data sets generated from social sciences research and scientific studies. These analyses deal with designed experiments in the laboratory or field-work setting together with data from less-rigorously planned observational studies. Measuring uncertainty, describing patterns of variability, and describing the inter-relationship between several variables are therefore essential aspects of social science and scientific investigations. These aspects require a good understanding of statistics. This computer-oriented but non-mathematical course develops the important concepts and methods of statistics. Although no knowledge of a programming language is required, the course makes extensive use of computers. This is made possible by high-quality, but user friendly statistical software like JMP or SPSS. Prerequisite ECOL2006 or ECON1003 or STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1306 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1008 or STAT2001 or STAT0602 or STAT3304 or (CogSc students having taken STAT1000 or STAT1301) (Students taking or having taken STAT0603 are not allowed to take this course) STAT2312 Data mining (6 credits) With an explosion in information technology in the past decade, vast amounts of data appear in a variety of fields such as finance, marketing research, customer relations management, medicine and healthcare. The challenge of understanding these data with the aim of creating new knowledge and finding new relationships among data attributes has led to the innovative usage of statistical methodologies and development of new ones. In this process, a new area called data mining is spawned. This course provides a comprehensive and practical coverage of essential data mining concepts and statistical models for data mining. Prerequisite ECOL2006 or ECON1003 or STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1301 or STAT1306 or STAT1801 or STAT1000 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT2001 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 STAT2313 Marketing engineering (6 credits) This course is designed to provide an overview and practical application of trends, technology and methodology used in the marketing survey process including problem formulation, survey design, data collection and analysis, and report writing. Special emphasis will be put on statistical techniques particularly for analysing marketing data including market segmentation, market response models, consumer preference analysis and conjoint analysis. Students will analyse a variety of marketing case studies. Prerequisite STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1301 or STAT1306 or STAT1801 or ECON1003 or ECOL2006 or STAT1000 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1007 or STAT1008 or STAT2001 or STAT0601 or STAT0602 274 STAT2314 Business forecasting (6 credits) In daily business operations, forecasts are routinely required on different aspects of the economy, the market and individual companies. Numerous statistical techniques have been developed in the past decades to provide forecasts for the business decision-maker. This course considers a wide range of such techniques that have proven useful to practitioners. The course will involve the use of computer software, EXCEL, in the teaching process. Prerequisite ECOL2006 or ECON1003 or STAT0301 or STAT0302 or STAT1306 or STAT1001 or STAT1003 or STAT1006 or STAT1008 or STAT2001 or STAT0602 STAT2315 Practical mathematics for investment (6 credits) The main focus of this course will be on financial mathematics of compound interest and financial derivatives. Introduction to risk management and practical applications of the actuarial functions are also considered. Prerequisite Any introductory-level or junior-level course (Students taking or having taken STAT1802 are not allowed to take this course.) STAT2318 Directed studies in statistics (6 credits) To enhance the student's knowledge of a particular topic and the student's self-directed learning and critical thinking skills. Prerequisite Major in Statistics or Risk Management and at least 18 credits of introductory-level courses in Statistics or Risk Management, and consent of Major Coordinator. STAT2801 Life contingencies (6 credits) The major objectives of this course are to integrate life contingencies into a full probabilistic framework and to demonstrate the wide variety of constructs which are then possible to build from basic models at the foundation of actuarial science. The time-until-death random variable will be the basic building block by which models for life insurances, designed to reduce the financial impact of the random event of untimely death, will be developed. Techniques for calculation benefit premiums and benefit reserves of various types of life annuity and insurance will be discussed. Prerequisite (STAT1302 and STAT2315) or (STAT1802 and taking or having taken STAT2802) or (STAT1302 and STAT1802) or (STAT0100 and STAT0113) STAT2804 Linear models and forecasting (6 credits) This course deals with applied statistical methods of linear models and investigates various forecasting procedures through time series analysis. Prerequisite STAT1302 or (Students taking or having taken STAT2802) or STAT0100 or STAT0605 (Students taking or having taken STAT2301 or STAT3301 or STAT0102 or STAT0604 or STAT3101 are not allowed to take this course) STAT2805 Credibility theory and loss distributions (6 credits) Credibility is an example of a statistical estimate. The idea of credibility is very useful in premium 275 calculation. Insurance loss varies according to the business nature, what distribution should be used to fit a particular loss is both of theoretical interest and practical importance. This course covers important actuarial and statistical methods. Prerequisite STAT1302 or STAT2802 or STAT3810 or STAT0100 or STAT0604 or STAT0605 or STAT0802 STAT2806 Financial economics (6 credits) This course covers the skills necessary to construct and apply discrete stochastic models to value financial derivatives. Prerequisite STAT1302 or STAT2802 or STAT0100 or STAT0604 or STAT0605 STAT2807 Corporate finance for actuarial science (6 credits) This course is designed for actuarial science students to receive VEE-Corporate Finance from Society of Actuaries. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the fundamental principles of corporate finance. The course will provide students with a systematic framework within which to evaluate investment and financing decisions for corporations. Prerequisite (BUSI1002 and STAT1802) or (STAT2310 and STAT2315) STAT3301 Time-series analysis (6 credits) A time series consists of a set of observations on a random variable taken over time. Time series arise naturally in climatology, economics, environment studies, finance and many other disciplines. The observations in a time series are usually correlated; the course establishes a framework to discuss this. This course distinguishes different type of time series, investigates various representations for the processes and studies the relative merits of different forecasting procedures. Students will analyse real time-series data on the computer. Prerequisite STAT2301 or STAT0102 or STAT0604. (Students taking or having taken STAT0801 or STAT2804 are not allowed to take this course.) STAT3302 Multivariate data analysis (6 credits) In many designed experiments or observational studies the researchers are dealing with multivariate data, where each observation is a set of measurements taken on the same individual. These measurements are often correlated. The correlation prevents the use of univariate statistics to draw inferences. This course develops the statistical methods for analysing multivariate data through examples in various fields of application and hands-on experience with the statistical software SAS. Prerequisite STAT0102 or STAT0604 or STAT0801 or STAT2301 or STAT2804 STAT3304 Computer-aided statistical modelling (6 credits) This is a computer-aided course of statistical modelling designed for the students who have taken STAT2301 Linear Statistical Analysis and like to see theory illustrated by practical computation. Numerous real data sets will be presented for modelling and analysis using statistical software, such as SAS, for gaining hands-on experience. The course also aims to develop skills of model selection and hypotheses formulation for testing, so that questions of interest can be properly formulated and answered. An important element deals with model review and improvement, when one's first attempt does not adequately fit the data. Modern computer software such as SAS makes this interactive approach easier. 276 Prerequisite STAT2301 or STAT2804 or STAT0102 or STAT0801 (Students taking or having taken STAT3601 or STAT2311 are not allowed to take this course) STAT3305 Financial data analysis (6 credits) This course focuses on understanding financial data and methods by which they are analyzed and interpreted. It aims at enhancing the students' analytical skills of developing statistical models for analysing financial data. Techniques are motivated by examples and developed in the context of applications. Students will learn how to process financial data for purposes of financial analysis, estimation and testing of financial models and to understand better crucial aspects of financial market movements. Prerequisite ECON1001 or STAT2309 or (Students taking or having taken STAT2806) STAT3306 Selected topics in statistics (6 credits) This course introduces basic statistical concepts and methods which potential graduate students will find useful in preparing for work on a research degree in statistics. Focus is on applications of state-of-the-art statistical techniques and their underlying theory. Prerequisite STAT0102 or STAT0801 or STAT0604 or STAT2301 or STAT2804 STAT3307 Project in statistics (6 credits) Each year a few projects suitable for Statistics or Actuarial Science major students will be offered. These projects, under the supervision of individual staff members involve the application of statistics and/or probability in interesting situations. They provide students with practical experience in approaching a real problem, in report writing and in oral presentation. Prerequisite STAT2301 or (STAT2802 and STAT2804) or STAT0102 or STAT0604 or (STAT2802 and STAT0801). Approval is subject to past academic performance. Availability of this course to Actuarial Science students is also subject to a quota. STAT3308 Financial engineering (6 credits) This course aims at demonstrating the practical use of financial derivative products to analyse various problems arisen in financial engineering. Emphases are on the various option pricing formulae, hedging techniques and interest rate models. Prerequisite 1) STAT2309 or (Students taking or having taken STAT2806) or STAT0109 or STAT0806 (for students admitted in 2004-05 or before); or 2) STAT2315 (for students admitted in 2005-06 or thereafter) STAT3316 Advanced probability (6 credits) This course provides an introduction to measure theory and probability. The course will focus on some basic concepts in probability which are essential for students to read research papers in actuarial science, probability and statistics. Prerequisite STAT2303 or STAT2803 or similar level courses in probability theory. STAT3317 Computational statistics (6 credits) 277 This course aims to give undergraduate and postgraduate students in statistics a background in modern computationally-intensive methods in statistics. It emphasizes the role of computation as a fundamental tool of discovery in data analysis, of statistical inference, and for development of statistical theory and methods. Prerequisite STAT2301 STAT3319 Statistics project * (6 credits) Each year a few projects suitable for Statistics or Actuarial Science major students will be offered. These projects, under the supervision of individual staff members involve the application of statistics and/or probability in interesting situations. They provide students with practical experience in approaching a real problem, in report writing and in oral presentation. Prerequisite STAT2301 or (STAT2802 and STAT2804) or STAT0102 or STAT0604 or (STAT2802 and STAT0801). Approval is subject to past academic performance. Availability of this course to Actuarial Science students is also subject to a quota. * Offered from 2009-2010. For students admitted in 2007-08 or thereafter only. STAT3810 Risk theory (6 credits) Risk theory is one of the main topics in actuarial science. Risk theory is the applications of statistical models and stochastic processes to insurance problems such as the premium calculation, policy modifications, ruin probability, etc. Prerequisite (Taking or having taken STAT2803) or STAT2303 or MATH2603 or STAT0103 STAT3811 Survival analysis (6 credits) This course is concerned with how models which predict the survival pattern of humans or other entities are established. This exercise is sometimes referred to as survival-model construction. Prerequisite (Taking or having taken STAT2802) or STAT2301 or STAT2801 or STAT0102 or STAT0604 or STAT0801 STAT3812 Stochastic calculus with financial applications (6 credits) Stochastic calculus has become an essential tool in economics, insurance, finance and econometrics. This mathematical theory is the basis for pricing financial derivatives such as options and futures. This course is designed for students to develop professional skills in stochastic calculus and its applications to actuarial science and finance. Pure mathematical components of the course will be kept at a reasonably low level. The course begins with an overview of the basic concepts from probability theory. Stochastic processes, especially Brownian motion and martingales will be discussed. Prerequisite MATH2603 or STAT2303 or STAT2803 or STAT0103 Faculty-level courses SCNC0004 Scientific thinking and interesting discoveries * (3 credits) The objective of this course is to explore scientific thinking and also its relationship with the process of discovery. To provide an introduction of the logic of scientific thinking that leads eventually to interesting scientific discoveries. The course also emphasizes the appreciation of these discoveries and their implications. 278 Prerequisite Nil * Not offered in 2007-2008. Language courses offered to BSc students School of Chinese CSCI0001 (1) Practical Chinese language course for science students * (3 credits) Practical Chinese Writing Skills (a) Classical and modern Chinese (b) The Chinese language: characteristics and usage (c) Basic grammar of modern Chinese (2) Chinese Characters (a) Traditional characters (b) Simplified characters (c) Variant forms (3) Letter-writing (a) Business letter writing techniques (b) Official letter writing techniques (4) Office Documents (a) Notices and announcements (b) Proposals (c) Minutes and reports of meetings (5) Chinese for Special Purposes (a) Reader-based scientific/technical writings (b) Styles and rhetoric of scientific/technical writings (6) Presentation and Communication Techniques (a) Communication and presentation techniques (b) Discussion and the art of persuasion Prerequisite Nil * This course is compulsory for all BSc students. CSCI0002 Putonghua course for science students * (no credit) 1. To learn the basic characteristics of Putonghua. 2. To learn the terms and phrases commonly used in everyday situations. 3. To learn the glossary in the specific field. 4. To have a better understanding of Chinese culture and people. Prerequisite Nil * This course is available for BSc I students only. Average class size is around 25. CSCI2002 (1) (2) Advanced language studies in Chinese (3 credits) (3) To hone students' communicative skills in Chinese. This course aims to improve their reading, listening, writing and speaking abilities in Chinese. To expose students to different aspects of the language. This course covers a wide range of both linguistic and extra-linguistic subject matters, the knowledge of which would enable the students to use the language in an efficacious way. To give pre-service language training to students. This course equips the students with language 279 proficiency to get and secure a job. To promote deeper understanding of Chinese culture. This course identifies areas of Chinese culture that are essential for the students to understand their society better. Prerequisite CSCI0001 (4) English ECEN1801 Academic English for science students * (3 credits) To build confidence in the use of English for writing and speaking about science. The focus is on: (1) Writing an essay which meets the requirements of good academic writing, in particular making appropriate use of published sources and avoiding plagiarism. (2) Speaking in an organized and coherent manner. Prerequisite Nil * This course is compulsory for all B.Sc. students. ECEN2802 Advanced English for science students * (3 credits) To develop a sense of audience awareness in writing, to develop spontaneous speaking skills and to individualise language learning. The focus is on: (1) Writing a short article for one of a range of web journals each with a different audience and topic focus (individual choice). (2) Spontaneous (i.e. unrehearsed) discussion through participation in speaking workshops and one-to-one discussions. (3) Developing independent language learning skills to help students address their individual language problems and focus on their future language needs. Prerequisite ECEN1801 * This course is compulsory for all B.Sc. students. 280 FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES Language Studies Courses offered to BSocSc students CSSC1001. Practical Chinese language course for social sciences students (3 credits) This course aims at enhancing students' knowledge and skills in practical Chinese writing in the social sciences. Students will be introduced to simplified Chinese characters, and will be trained to write letters, proposals, reports, press releases and announcements. They will also acquire the skills in making public speeches and presentations. The course involves extensive use of Chinese IT applications. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. CUND0002. Practical Chinese language and Hong Kong society (3 credits) (for Mainland Students only) This course is designed for Mainland students with the dual aim of providing them with an opportunity to acquaint themselves with the essential features of practical Chinese and paving the way for them to arrive at a deeper, broader understanding of the Hong Kong culture. The key topics include the Chinese language and the history of Hong Kong, the spoken Chinese language and the Hong Kong culture, traditional and simplified characters as well as the basic skills and principles in language communication. CUND0003. Cantonese for mainland students (3 credits) (for Mainland Students only) This course is intended for non-Cantonese speaking Mainland students who may not have prior knowledge of the dialect. It aims to describe the basic characteristics of the Cantonese dialect; to explore the phonetic structures of Cantonese; to sharpen students' basic communication skills in daily life; and to enable students to gain a proper understanding of the culture and people of Hong Kong. Topics to be covered include the Cantonese sound system, the Yale System of Romanization, the phonetic, lexical and syntactic differences and correspondences between Cantonese and Putonghua as well as Hong Kong customs and conventions. ECEN1901. Academic English for Social Sciences (3 credits) This course introduces students to features of speaking and writing in English in an academic context. Through small group work related to language and disciplinary issues the course develops abilities to produce clear and coherent spoken and written discourse for university study in the social sciences. Assessment: 100% coursework. ECEN2902. English for Professional Communication for Social Sciences (3 credits) The course prepares students to communicate effectively and accurately and prepare themselves for workplace situations which entail the use of English. It requires students to investigate an issue relevant to their studies, improve their interview and presentation skills, and write various professional documents. Assessment: 100% coursework 281 Junior Level Courses Faculty-level Courses (FOSS) FOSS1002. Appreciating social research (6 credits) Social science researchers investigate social phenomena from different perspectives using different research methodologies. This course will provide a chance for students to take a close look at social science research, and attain a general understanding of the different research orientations taken by social sciences researchers. After taking the course, students will be more knowledgeable and equipped to understand general research findings in social sciences. Emphasis will be on nurturing critical thinking skills and aptitudes for appreciating research evidences encountered in future studies and daily experiences. Assessment: 100% coursework. FOSS1003. Masters in social thought (6 credits) Over time, outstanding master thinkers in different social scientific disciplines have produced landmark studies and ingenious conceptual frameworks to illuminate the world we live in. This course introduces students to the works and ideas of selected `masters' in social sciences, in particular how they continue to enlighten us, by applying their insights to examine the pressing social issues that surround us in the intricately globalized world of today. The basis for our enquiries will be from the works of writers as diverse as Sigmund Freud, Erich Fromm, J.S. Mill, Emile Durkheim, and Karl Marx amongst others. After taking the course, students will learn the ways of thinking and major insights of selected masters of social sciences. Students will also be able to make use of their insights to reflect on some of the major issues they face in life. Assessment: 100% coursework. Department of Geography First Year The Department offers a Geography undergraduate curriculum which is designed to assist the students in learning and understanding geographical and environmental-related knowledge and issues within a modern context and perspective. Details on updated course descriptions are available from our website: http://geog.hku.hk/undergraduate. The first-year junior level (Level 100) geography courses are taught in the form of lectures, discussion classes, fieldwork and practical classes. Each course will be examined by one two-hour written paper at the end of the semester in which the course is taught. The basic aim of the courses is to provide students who intend to major or otherwise in Geography in their second and third years with a general environmental-geography background and an introduction to geographical methods of inquiry, with a focus on China and the Asia-Pacific region. First-year students intending to major or minor in Geography in their second- and third-years must successfully complete one junior level 6-credit `core' geography courses. In order to have a wider basic knowledge for their second- and third-year studies as Geography majors, first-year students are strongly advised to successfully complete two junior level geography courses. 282 Junior Level (Level 100) Courses GEOG1002. Hong Kong: land, people and resources (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of the physical and human environment of Hong Kong with its larger geographical and regional setting. After an introduction to the major physical features, a range of contemporary issues such as demographic structure and changes, economic development, industrialization, urbanization, housing and planning will be examined. It will conclude with a discussion on Hong Kong's future development problems and their possible solutions. This is an independent course which can be taken by students from various disciplines. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG1005. Map use, reading and interpretation (6 credits) (This course is eligible for non-Social Sciences students to seek exemption from IT Broadening.) Maps have been used for centuries to describe spatial patterns and portray association and correlation. Recent developments in digital spatial data handling have changed the environment where maps are used. Maps are no longer confined to the printed format. The objective of this course is to provide an integrated discussion of standard planimetric maps, their uses, and the basic skills necessary to take full advantage of these maps. The lectures will cover fundamental concepts underlying different mapping/analytical techniques, their strengths, limitations, and application settings. The practicals will be devoted to imparting essential computer operating skills to visualize spatial data. Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination. GEOG1012. Economic and social development in an urbanizing world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to the processes and spatial patterns of economic development and social changes in an increasingly urbanizing world. Important subjects to be discussed include the geographical dynamics of economic development, the trend of economic globalization versus local development, the location issue in various economic sectors, geopolitics and the new world order, as well as social and environmental concerns in the urbanization process. Emphasis will be placed on the geographical explanation of economic development and emerging urban issues in this fast changing world. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG1014. Spatial distribution of hazards and disasters (3 credits) (also available as inter-faculty elective course to Year 1, 2 & 3 students outside the Faculty of Social Sciences) Earth processes, the effects of which can be harmful to human life, are considered natural hazards whose impact on human populations often result in disasters. This course offers a broad overview of why various natural hazards, and hence various disasters, which occur on Earth do so in particular geographical regions by investigating the spatial dimensions of their underlying causes and impacts. In turn this provides a better understanding of the geographical distribution of risk across the planet. Assessment: 100% examination. 283 GEOG1016. Nature conservation for sustainable societies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The consumption of the Earth's resources has reached an alarming level in terms of the intensity and severity of deleterious impacts. This course surveys the major issues related to the tenure of human-nature interactions, their current status as well as the prognosis for the future. A synoptic view on the cultural roots of the exploitative utilization of our planet sets the backdrop for a systematic assessment of the different but interrelated components of the resource system. Various abiotic, biotic and abiotic-cum-biotic segments are discussed in the light of their diversified uses and misuses in different human societies, and the possibility for a more enlightened approach towards a more sustainable future. Adopting a non-technical approach, this course appeals to students with a background in different arts, social sciences or science disciplines. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG1017. Human geography in a globalizing world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is an introductory course about the processes and spatial patterns of human population, settlements, and culture in a globalizing world. Important subjects to be discussed will include the main themes of human geography as a spatial science, geography of population and migration, technological innovation and cultural diffusion, the changing cultural landscape, human impacts on the natural environment, and changing geography in major world regions. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction between human society and the natural environment. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG1018. Hong Kong's environment: issues and policies (6 credits) (This course is also offered to non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims at providing students a comprehensive overview of the major environmental issues being debated by society-at-large in Hong Kong. Leading environmental issues such as air and water pollution, solid waste management, conservation, and noise pollution will be discussed, from a geographical perspective, with regard to their causes (both internal and external) and consequences for Hong Kong. The successes and limitations of policy responses to each of these problems will be examined. Larger society-environment linkages such as public environmental perceptions, corporate environmental governance, environmental non-governmental organizations will be analyzed in relation to the question of how the universal concept of Sustainable Development is being contextualized in this city. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG1019. Geography field camp (3 credits) This field camp is introduced to offer Year One students a unique opportunity to develop practical problem-solving capability through field work, group projects, and social survey. A set of well-organized geographic problems is identified from the field of the chosen study area. Students are divided into groups each of which is led by one to two teaching staff and demonstrators. Practical tasks are given with necessary guidance and explanation, but students are expected to solve the problems independently through group discussion, field survey, and close communication with teachers, demonstrators and teaching assistants as well as fellow students. The purpose is to facilitate students' understanding and appreciation of geographical studies in a real world situation. It is also intended to serve as a platform for Year One students, intending to major in Geography, to develop basic field work skill for their following years of study. 284 Assessment: 100% coursework. Department of Politics and Public Administration Students who wish to major/double major/minor in Politics and Public Administration must successfully complete POLI1003 in semester I or II. Unless otherwise specified, the final grading for each course will be determined by performance in the examination and assessment of coursework in a ratio to be announced by individual course instructors at the beginning of each semester. The weighting of examination ranges from 40-60% of total course assessment. POLI1002. Fundamentals of public administration (6 credits) This is an introductory course to the study of Public Administration. It seeks to introduce students to fundamental concepts and theories in the discipline. Main themes that will be examined include the traditions, core functions and processes, as well as the politics and accountability of public administration. POLI1003. Making sense of politics (6 credits) It is an introductory course offered to students with no previous background in political science. It covers the basic concepts, institutions and processes that one would encounter in the study of politics. Emphasis will be placed on the application of concepts to current issues, including (but not restricted to) that of Hong Kong. Department of Psychology For candidates admitted in or after the academic year 2006-2007 Student who intends to major in Psychology must have taken either PSYC1001 and PSYC1004; or PSYC1002, PSYC1003 and PSYC1004. Students who have taken PSYC1001 are not allowed to take PSYC1002 or PSYC1003 and vice versa. The final grading for each course will be determined by performance in the examination and an assessment of coursework in a ratio of 40% coursework, 60% examination, unless otherwise specified. For candidates admitted in or before the academic year 2005-2006 Student who intends to major in Psychology must have taken PSYC1001, or PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. Students who have taken PSYC1001 are not allowed to take PSYC1002 or PSYC1003 and vice versa. The final grading for each course will be determined by performance in the examination and an assessment of coursework in a ratio of 40% coursework, 60% examination, unless otherwise specified. PSYC1001. Introduction to psychology (6 credits) Discussion of basic concepts in psychology and a preliminary survey of representative work carried out in various areas of psychological investigation, together with an investigation at some length of one such area. Eligibility: Students taking or having taken PSYC1002 or PSYC1003 are not allowed to take this course. PSYC1002. How the mind works: explorations in basic thinking processes (6 credits) We are all fascinated by the achievements of the human mind or brain. But we may also often ask 285 ourselves how we can do things better, for example, remember more efficiently. This course will help us to understand more about the ways in which we solve problems, how we develop our abilities to communicate through language, and how we think creatively. It will help us to answer questions about why we forget things, how we manage to see things in the world around us, why we sleep and what our dreams mean. We will look at the ways in which the human brain operates, and how it manages to do such amazing things, through reference to research findings, theories and our own practical work. Lectures will include class demonstrations and activities, as well as videos, presented in a way to enhance your interest in, and memory of, what is already a fascinating area. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. Eligibility: Students taking or having taken PSYC1001 are not allowed to take this course. PSYC1003. Psychology and life: personality and social influence (6 credits) Through lectures and a series of stimulating class activities, students in this course will learn the latest research discoveries in motivation and emotion, human development, intelligence, personality, psychological testing, stress and health, abnormal psychological functioning, psychotherapy, social attraction, social influence and social competence. The course is intended to enhance the development of self-understanding and social competence. Eligibility: Students taking or having taken PSYC1001 are not allowed to take this course. PSYC1004. Introduction to quantitative methods in psychology (6 credits) This course adopts a practical approach to teaching the analytical aspects of research techniques in psychology. It is designed to provide students with the basic background in research design and data analysis. The logic of statistical inference and scientific explanation, the merits and limitations of quantitative approaches to the study of psychological phenomena, and research ethics will all be discussed. Permission of Department Head is required for enrollment. Priority will be given to students planning to major in psychology. Assessment: 100% coursework. Department of Social Work and Social Administration Students who intend to major or minor in Social Work and Social Administration must successfully complete either SOWK1001 or SOWK1003. The final grading will be determined by performance in the examination and an assessment of coursework in the ratio of 60:40. Teachers concerned will announce at the beginning of each semester the assessment ratio for courses not assessed in the 60:40 examination/coursework ratio. SOWK1001. Introduction to social administration (6 credits) This is a basic course in the understanding of social policy in the areas of human resources planning and education, land use and housing, ageing and social security, family and support services, etc. SOWK1002. Introduction to social work (6 credits) The course introduces the basic principles and concepts of social work. Students will obtain an understanding of the philosophy, knowledge and values which form the base for social work practice, social work as a profession, and the role of the social worker in modern society. SOWK1003. Introduction to social welfare (6 credits) 286 This course introduces the basic concepts and function of social welfare. Analysis will be undertaken of the range and variety of social services in Hong Kong including family services, youth centres, outreaching services, school social work, community development, rehabilitation, elderly services, probation and correctional services. Department of Sociology The final grading for each course will be determined by performance in the examination and an assessment of coursework in a ratio of 40% coursework, 60% examination, unless otherwise specified. Students may select at most two courses from the following: SOCI1001. Introduction to sociology (6 credits) This course introduces students to the nature of sociological enquiry and the basic concepts used in sociological analysis. After some reference to the influence of inheritance and environment on human social behaviour, the course will focus on key concepts used in the analysis of cultures, social structures, social processes and social change. The relationship between research, concepts and contemporary theory will be explored at an introductory level. SOCI1002. Discovering society (6 credits) This course introduces students to the sociological way of thinking through reference mainly to Chinese societies such as Hong Kong, Mainland China, and overseas Chinese communities. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. SOCI1003. Introduction to anthropology (6 credits) This course will explore, through cross-cultural comparison, key social and cultural issues, such as marriage and the family, caste and class, ethnicity and identity, language and culture, state formation, economic values, gender and religion. The course will draw on studies of the peoples and cultures of Asia. Cognitive Science Programme COGN1001. Introduction to cognitive science (6 credits) This course allows students to gain an understanding of the workings of the mind in the context of the technological advances that are increasingly shaping our lives and our society. The course introduces students to the domain, goals and methods of Cognitive Science, showing how different disciplines converge in their enquiry into how the brain works. With integration as the overall objective, there will be a series of lectures given by specialists within each of the major disciplines (Computer Science, Linguistics, Philosophy, Physiology and Psychology) that contribute to Cognitive Science. Each series of lectures will present case studies highlighting research findings which show how similar questions about the functioning of the human mind are answered from the perspective of each contributing discipline. Assessment: 100% coursework. 287 Senior Level Courses Faculty-level Courses (FOSS) FOSS0001. Media, culture and communication in contemporary China (6 credits) China has been undergoing dramatic and rapid social change as it becomes embedded in the global economy, and as such, has been the focus of a great deal of media attention. This course investigates the multi-faceted ways in which China's social, economic, political, and legal cultures are portrayed in different forms of contemporary media. Assessment: 100% coursework. FOSS0003. Human Security in the global context (6 credits) What is Human Security? How does the security and well-being of the individual relate to the security of the state? When we look around the world today, are our national security apparatuses providing us with the security that we need? Human Security refers to an emerging paradigm for understanding global politics whose proponents believe that the world requires a more comprehensive notion of security, one that marries the traditionally separate fields of development and defense studies and links the traditionally opposing principles of human rights and state sovereignty. Human Security proponents argue that today's security threats go beyond our traditional understanding of defense threats, (e.g. attack from another state) to include poverty, economic inequality, diseases, human rights abuses, environmental pollution, and natural disasters. This course will review the emergence of and major themes behind the Human Security paradigm and will ask if and how Human Security can be meaningfully applied in a policy context. The use of real-world case studies and simulation exercises throughout the course uses will help students understand and apply the material covered. Students are encouraged to make their own critical judgments about the value of the Human Security agenda towards the end of the course. Assessment: 40% examination and 60% coursework. FOSS0004. Gender and the global economy (6 credits) This course uses the lens of gender to critically examine a world order of global capitalism that characterizes the beginning of the twenty-first century. It examines some of the macro processes that affect especially the developing world today: the internationalization of production, trade liberalization, and the ever strengthening force of international financial institutions (IFIs); international migration; intensifying environmental degradation; and escalating violence and conflict on a world scale. These processes, when combined with local culture and social-political structure, often have differential impact on different strata of men and women. The course ends with an exploration of solutions or creative initiatives emanating from governmental and nongovernmental organizations, from women's and men's movements, and from civil society at large. Eligibility: Students taking or having taken POLI0016 are not allowed to take this course. FOSS0005. Globalization and crime (6 credits) This course introduces students to the study of the relationship between globalization and crime. It is divided into three main sections. The first part of the course introduces students to the major perspectives of globalization and how crime fits into these discussions. The second part of the course examines recent efforts to understand the dialectical process of crime and globalization using examples like the global drug economy, corruption and human trafficking. The third section will contend with the obstacles and strategies for addressing crime in the global context. 288 This course provides students with a better understanding of the ways in which crime and globalization interact. It is also designed to facilitate students' critical thinking about how crime operates in the local and transnational context and the difficulties in dealing with crime at these two levels. Assessment: 50% examination and 50% coursework (30% an individual portfolio and 20% a group project). FOSS0006. Drug control in comparative perspective (6 credits) This course introduces students to the historical and contemporary trends in illicit drug use around the world and public policy efforts to control it. The course is divided into three main sections. The first part of the course introduces students to the rise of opiate use in China and elsewhere, the Opium Wars, and the resulting international efforts to control opiate consumption and production. The second part of the course examines contemporary international and local efforts to deal with current drug use including heroin, cocaine and amphetamine type stimulants. The third section will be devoted to examining efforts to shift from a crime oriented perspective of illicit drug use to that of a public health approach focusing on ways to educate and reduce the harms associated with illicit drug use. Examples are drawn from a number of countries including Hong Kong, China, Thailand, the U.S., the United Kingdom, Australia and the Netherlands. This course provides students with a better understanding of the construction of social control policies in relation to the consumption of "pleasurable substances." It is designed to facilitate students' critical thinking about such questions as: Who is making these policies? Why are these policies being made? Who are these policies directed at? What impact have these policies had? Assessment: 50% examination and 50% coursework (30% an individual portfolio and 20% a group project). FOSS0007. Policy/practice research project (9 credits) This course is under the Social Exposure Programme of the Faculty which aims at assisting students to develop social awareness, critical thinking, analytic ability, improve their interpersonal and communication skills, and enhance their integration of classroom knowledge into real life practice. Students will be assigned to work for a policy/practice research project from a list provided themes, for not less than 160 hours during term time or summer time. The tasks involved can be literature review, data collection, data analysis, report writing, or a combination of the above. Assessment: 100% coursework. Remarks: No re-assessed arrangement will be allowed to those students who fail in this course and the result of the first attempt will be counted towards Weighted Grade Point Average. FOSS0008. Social science internship (9 credits) This course is under the Social Exposure Programme of the Faculty which aims at developing students good understanding of social issues through first-hand practical experience and applying knowledge and skills learned to real life situations. Students are expected to become more socially aware, develop critical thinking and analytic ability, and improve their effective interpersonal and communication skills. Students will be placed in a local, regional or international NGO, a public or private international or local organisation or a research centre affiliated to the Faculty for a period of not less than 160 hours during term time or summer time. Students will work for the organization under the supervision of its relevant staff. Assessment: 100% coursework. Remarks: No re-assessed arrangement will be allowed to those students who fail in this course and the result of the first attempt will be counted towards Weighted Grade Point Average. 289 FOSS0010. East Asian politics and societies (6 credits) This course provides a multidisciplinary survey of contemporary political, economic, socio-cultural issues in three countries (areas) in East Asia in the era of globalization: Taiwan, South Korea and Japan. Three broad themes of topics will be examined: political system, political economy and social-cultural issues. We will ask following major questions: What are the basic features of political systems in these countries? What are the salient political issues in these countries? Why and to what extent do these countries succeeded in achieving industrialization? How are these countries coping with the increasing challenges of globalization? What are the impact of globalization on the societies and cultures of these countries? It attempts to posit these issues and questions within the broader contexts of theoretical perspectives of political science and sociology. Assessment: 50% examination and 50% coursework. Eligibility: Students taking or having taken POLI0012 are not allowed to take this course. FOSS0011. Researching media and culture (6 credits) This course provides students with both analytical and practical tools to conduct research on culture and media. It examines the logic and procedures involved in qualitative and quantitative research, focusing on the formulation of the research problem to research design, data collection, data analysis, and finally presenting research results. Through workshops and tutorials, students will acquire practical skills in doing research in media and culture, particularly content analysis, textual analysis, industry studies and reception studies. Assessment: 100% coursework. FOSS0013. Understanding global issues (6 credits) This is an introductory course on world politics. The purpose of this course is to help students to understand major global issues and familiarize them with basic concepts, approaches, and controversies in international relations studies. As we are living in a 'shrinking' world characterized by unprecedented levels of global interdependence, the course will also focus on the processes and impacts of globalization on international relations. Some of the issues studied in the course will include humanitarian intervention, global economic governance, poverty and inequality, international security threats, and transnational environmental problems. The course also covers issues such as the role of U.S. in world politics, or post-war international system shaped by the U.S. Assessment: 40% examination and 60% coursework Eligibility: Students taking or having taken POLI0021 are not allowed to take this course. FOSS0014. Cultural studies and modern societies (6 credits) Cultural studies has been one of the frontier subjects in social sciences and the humanities in the past two decades. This course introduces students to the major theories and methods involved. It does this by examining a range of substantive cultural phenomena accompanying the rise and transformation of modern societies. These include the rise of mass entertainment industries and their influence on social outlook and behaviour; the role of consumption in maintaining social identities and status hierarchy; street culture and youth behaviour; the search for fantasies in the shopping mall; new regimes of body management and their impact on gender relations; the survival of the most traditional ritual practices in a high-tech society; the impact of the globalization of production and consumption on notions of pleasure, space and time; and the triumph of image over substance in the media-saturated post-modern world. The learning approach adopted, befitting the complex nature of the issues, will be multi-disciplinary and multi-layered, consisting of theoretical engagements as well as practical project work. Students interested in modern media, journalism, popular culture and globalization will find the knowledge offered in this course indispensable. Assessment: 100% coursework. 290 FOSS0015. Sexing culture and identity (6 credits) What is gender? What is sex? How does our culture portray a "normal" female and male? How do popular culture, the law, medicine and science shape our sense of being women and men? How are we to perform these gendered expectations? Do we have two sexes only? What are transgender and transexuality? Ideas and ideals about women's and men's roles in contemporary society are a contentious and multifaceted topic. This course, co-taught by lecturers of different academic trainings, is designed to introduce students to a number of concepts and theoretical approaches to the study of gender and sexuality. It aims to help students to have better understanding of cultural constructions of gender and sexuality and the many debates and controversies surrounding these areas. To unravel cultural assumptions about gender and sexuality, it will use a variety of texts including films, documentaries, fictions, popular psychology, and scholarly journal articles to interrogate how different societies create certain ideals of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality to make us who we are. Assessment: 100% coursework FOSS3003. Research project in global studies (6 credits) This is a year-long independent studies project for final year candidates who major in the Global Studies programme. Over the course of this year-long project, students will design, conduct, and write-up their own research paper. They will also be obligated to find an additional research advisor who will have agreed to provide significant guidance and expert advice to the student throughout the course of this project. The choice of research project is subject to the final approval of the Programme Coordinator. Assessment: 100% coursework Prerequisite: FOSS1002 Appreciating social research or a similar research methodology course, subject to the discretion of Programme Coordinator Eligibility: Students taking or having taken FOSS3005 "Internship in global studies" are not allowed to take this course. FOSS3005. Internship in global studies (6 credits) This is a year-long internship for final year candidates who major in the Global Studies programme. Students will be placed in an organization, which has a regional or global agenda, for not less than 160 hours. Students are expected to integrate their classroom learning with their placement experience in order to develop a better understanding of the impact of global integration. To do this, they will have to (1) successfully fulfill the internship requirements of the community partner; (2) fully participate in the internship orientation and evaluation program; (3) thoughtfully write 2 reflective journals (500 words each); and (4) develop and complete a 2000-word final report on a topic that links the student's internship experience with his or her global studies coursework. The choice of internship is subject to the final approval of the Programme Coordinator. Assessment: 100% coursework Prerequisite: FOSS1002 Appreciating social research or a similar research methodology course which is subject to the discretion of Programme Coordinator Eligibility: Students taking or having taken FOSS3003 "Research project in global studies" are not allowed to take this course. FOSS3004. Research project in media and cultural studies (6 credits) This is a year-long independent research project for final year candidates who major in the Media and 291 Cultural Studies programme. There will be regular research meetings which are designed to allow students to formulate and carry out a project on a topic of their own choosing related to the Media and Cultural Studies programme, under the guidance from a supervisor and an adviser. At the end of the course, students have to submit a final research paper and give a multi-media presentation. For those who intend to take this course, FOSS0011 is highly recommended. The choice of research project is subject to the final approval of the Programme Coordinator. Assessment: 100% coursework Prerequisite: FOSS1002 Appreciating social research or a similar research methodology course, subject to the discretion of Programme Coordinator Eligibility: Students taking or having taken FOSS3006 "Internship in media and cultural studies" are not allowed to take this course. FOSS3006. Internship in media and cultural studies (6 credits) This is a year-long internship for final year candidates who major in the Media and Cultural Studies programme. Students will be placed in a cultural or media agency for not less than 160 hours. They are expected to integrate their classroom learning into their placement experience and develop better understanding of media and cultural issues in a real life situation. The choice of internship is subject to the final approval of the Programme Coordinator. Assessment: 100% coursework Prerequisite: FOSS1002 Appreciating social research or a similar research methodology course, subject to the discretion of Programme Coordinator. Eligibility: Students taking or having taken FOSS3004 "Research project in media and cultural studies" are not allowed to take this course. Department of Geography Second and Third Years Senior Level (Level 200 & 300) Courses GEOG2004. Atmospheric environment and global climate * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is divided into three major sections. In the first, the basic characteristics and features of the atmospheric environment are examined from the viewpoint of the basic physical and dynamical processes which occur in the atmosphere and between the atmosphere and the underlying surface. In the second both the spatial and temporal dimensions of the resulting climate are explored at a range of scales to provide an understanding of the link between the processes occurring in the climate system and the diversity of climatic conditions which occur on Earth. A special section is devoted to the climates of China. In the last section, various means of reconstructing and modelling the climate system are explored with a view to understanding the nature of past climates and the variety of potential future climates that might be possible. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2096. Human impacts on ecosystems* (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course introduces students to the basic concepts of biogeography by studying the structure and functioning of natural ecosystems and their extensive modifications by human activities. It provides a 292 comprehensive foundation on basic ecological concepts, including structure and organization of ecosystems, energy flow and nutrient cycling, evolution of the biosphere and ecosystem succession and changes. Some special issues of ecosystem management of relevance to nature conservation and protection are then expounded, including species interactions, biotic dispersal and migration, fire as a natural-cum-anthropic factor, continental drift and Pleistocene Glaciation, domestication and agricultural origin, the pervasive ecological impacts of modern agriculture and urbanization, and the application of island biogeography theory to habitat and species conservation. This is a course of general appeal to students with different backgrounds and dispositions. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2097. Global landforms * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a core element in physical environmental study. The course provides a systematic description and analysis of earth surface landscapes and the processes that create them. Since earth Given that the Earth's land surface is located at the interface of the Earth's lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere, this study is closely related to a wide range of disciplines of natural environments. Topics discuss the landforms and their processes in different environments, including slope, fluvial, coastal, glacial and arid locations. The landforms created by tectonic movement and the techniques in geomorphology are also studied. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2098. Methods and techniques in spatial analysis (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course aims to introduce students to the research methodology and techniques commonly used in the discipline. This is a foundation course for research in geography. Following a discussion of the uses, implementation and limitations of surveys, various descriptive and inferential statistics of spatial concentration, associations and autocorrelation are introduced. Underlying concepts and theories are illustrated with practical applications in physical and human geography. Classroom teaching is supplemented by computer laboratory sessions, individual assignments and a group project. Abilities to evaluate survey reports critically and to apply spatial and non-spatial statistics appropriately are emphasized. Assessment: 100% coursework. GEOG2013. Sustainable development (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course evaluates the links between environmental protection and economic development. The world must manage its natural and environmental resources to meet the human needs of the present while at the same time preserving these resources for future generations. The course introduces students to different views on how human society can achieve the goal of economic growth without depleting the Earth's capital and jeopardizing the planet's life support system. It aims to enhance students' understanding of the issues relating to sustainable development. Although the course cannot provide complete answers to the issues, it helps develop students' ability of critical thinking and suggest promising directions in which answers may be sought. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. 293 GEOG2014. Countryside recreation and management (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Expansion in leisure time has led to an associated increase in recreation. The countryside can provide a range of activities and attractions. The course examines the countryside as a resource and looks at management issues. The provision of leisure will also be examined, as will how to `value' the countryside. Special case studies of National Parks in the USA and UK, along with Country Parks in Hong Kong will be undertaken. The environmental impact of recreation will also be studied. Competing claims for rural land and tensions resulting from countryside recreation will also be examined. Factors influencing participation in countryside recreation are examined. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2015. Environmental monitoring and assessment # (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course is divided into two parts. The first part deals with basic environmental monitoring methodology and techniques, which are how to obtain and analyse information on the existence and concentration of substances in the environment, either naturally occurring or from anthropogenic sources. It also examines natural hazards monitoring. The second part provides a basic concept and nature of environmental assessment (EA or EIA), an exploration of best practice in EA and a description of EA procedures. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2018. Transport geography (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course provides an understanding of the spatial structures and development of transport systems from a people-oriented geographical approach. This approach emphasizes the role of people in determining the evolution and use of transport systems and the role of the transportation systems in serving and changing our daily life through improving accessibility and mobility. The course will cover the fundamentals of geographical analysis on transport, the analysis on transport demand, supply and regulations, and the relationship between transport and development. Case studies of airports, ports, and urban transport networks provide explanations about the mechanisms and dynamics of transport systems in different geographical situations, and how they interact with local and global development. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2019. Environmental GIS * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to the methods of overlaying and merging of spatial data layers in environmental monitoring and decision-making. The principles of such an approach will be discussed focusing on the nature of environmental data (particularly the raster data structure and remote sensing images), data transformation and geocoding, modeling techniques, and accuracy evaluation of spatial databases. Students must complete a simple project embodying the application of the GIS concept in an environmental situation. Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination. 294 GEOG2020. Geography of wine # (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) There is an intimate relationship between geography and wine - where a wine comes from determines its quality, style and taste. This is principally because of the importance of the site and size of the vineyard, its soil, slope, rainfall, and sunshine; as well as the nature of the cultivation practices, choice of grape and methods of winemaking. This course first examines the history and evolution of winemaking and the fundamentals of the art and science of oenology to provide the student with a firm foundation for understanding the differences among the wide variety of wines produced worldwide. The remainder is dedicated to exploring the different wine regions of the world and the unique characteristics of each which give their products their distinctive features. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2021. Physical environment of China (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course firstly provides an explanation of basic natural environmental elements of China. Based on understanding and distribution of these elements, Chinese physical environment is then regionalized and the individual environmental regions are discussed in detail. The course also covers the utilization and transformation of natural environment since civilization and the major environmental problems in different regions. This course involves a compulsory field trip to China. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2030. Global development (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course explains the processes of globalization and discusses its important implications for national and regional development. A geographical perspective is adopted to explain and analyze the processes of globalization. Special emphasis is placed on the interactions of modern transnational corporations (TNCs) and the nation states. Case studies are drawn from different sectors of the economy and different regions of the world. Major issues, such as international trade and resource transfer, circuit of capital, product life cycle, technological innovations, the new international division of labour and transnational integration are addressed. Assessment: 50% coursework; 50% examination. GEOG2038. Climate change and the environment # (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course has as its primary concern climatic conditions on Earth and their interactions with life and human activities. It will focus on climate change, since to deal sensibly with questions raised concerning future climatic conditions and evaluation of their impact on environment and society, it is essential to understand the nature of the climate system and what causes it to change. In particular, the impact of human activities on the climate system will be set in perspective alongside the background of natural changes in the climate of our planet. Issues associated with societal decisions taken today and their potential impact on climate over the 295 next century will also be discussed. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2042. Urban hydrology and water quality # (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to provide students with appropriate knowledge about water in the city. It starts with an introduction to the two water cycles in the city: the natural and man-made systems. The modification of the hydrologic cycle in the urban system is discussed along with the water supply and drainage systems. Access to water, as a scarce resource, and its geographic contrasts are studied. Hydrologic problems in the city such as flooding and subsidence are also examined. Water quality of both natural and man-made water cycle systems are also investigated. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2045. Retail location * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces the basic principles and components of the retail system with the emphasis on the spatial pattern of demand and the value of location to various actors - the economic basis of location decision. The spatial structure of commercial activities are described and explained at both the settlement and the metropolitan scale with an eye on the location decisions of retail chains and developers. Students will be introduced to the most widely used procedures in store location studies and are urged to evaluate these techniques in terms of the retail chain's strategies and requirements in a local setting. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2048. Environmental hazards * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course examines a range of environmental hazards of geological, geomorphological, atmospheric, biological and human origin focussing on their origins, characteristics and impacts on human society. It will also deal with the responses available to different societies to deal with these hazards including disaster relief, loss sharing and event modification adjustments as well as comprehensive hazard planning and management principles. Where practicable local and regional examples will be used as illustrations. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2050. Modern environmentalism: society-environment relations * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course presents an introduction to environmentalism, which encompasses a set of beliefs and activities which inform and flow from a concern with the environment. Environmentalism has begun to assert itself globally (since the 1960s/1970s) and locally (from the late 1980s) as a significant force in response to, and sometimes influencing, patterns of development. This course will trace the emergence of environmentalism at both the global and local levels. It will examine the evolving linkages between environmentalism and some central societal issues such as social justice, poverty, and gender. The 296 responses of the business sector to increasing public concern for the environment, as well as mounting opposition to environmentalism, will be considered. The course will conclude with a discussion on various manifestations of environmentalism in Hong Kong to illustrate the complex relations between society and environment in a compact and high-density metropolitan milieu. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2051. Port and airport development # (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Port and airport are regarded in transport geography as two nodal development forms in multi-modal transport systems. Through a series of seminar-like discussions, this course provides a basic understanding of port and airport operations, and how these two forms of nodal transport infrastructure interact with other transport components and with urban and regional development. Examples drawn from different parts of the world will be discussed in detail and students are required to examine the local cases through field trips. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2054. Urban planning in practice in Hong Kong (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) On the understanding that students have already acquired some knowledge on urban planning (especially its basic theory and principles) and have keen interest in the work of the profession, this course will concentrate its discussions on selected aspects on urban planning in practice in Hong Kong. It will outline the actual functions and work of urban planning in real life and analyze the more important factors affecting urban planning in Hong Kong. A number of specific significant urban planning issues will be considered. The planning system, the planning legislation and other matters in the implementation mechanism will also be explained. The course will end with glimpses into the future development of Hong Kong and its planning-development relationship with neighbouring development areas. Assessment: 40% coursework; 60 examination. GEOG2055. Water resources and management * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course begins with an introduction to water as a resource, and the drainage basin hydrological cycle. The second part of the course focuses upon changing demand for water and explores possible solutions to the water problem. It also examines the issue of access to water. The human impact upon runoff and groundwater by means of land-use change is studied. Finally, water quality including pollution and its impact upon water supply is examined. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2056. Tourism and the shrinking world (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the global tourism system in the social cultural and economic contexts. With a balanced coverage of the whole range of components within the tourism 297 industry, it explores all aspects of both the private and public businesses related to tourism, such as theories, planning, environmental concerns, operations, and the interrelationships among the many tourism businesses. The material covered is intended to offer students knowledge of the tourism system, enable them to apply basic tourism concepts to various projects and problems, and help them to develop a career in the tourism industry. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2057. Leisure and recreation in modern society (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is an overview of the broad field of recreation and leisure, emphasizing the understanding of various leisure phenomena. As such, it aims to provide the students with an introductory understanding of the nature and scope of leisure, leisure behaviour and affiliated recreation activity. It also reviews relationships between leisure and space, place, time, play, work, family, education, ethnicity, gender, and environment. Assessment: 100% coursework. GEOG2060. An introduction to archaeology (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) How do you know where you are going until you know where you have been? This course will introduce students to the role archaeology has played in the construction of humanity's history and prehistory. It is intended to be a broad survey of the discipline, its discoveries, scientific and analytical tools and applications. The course will assist students in recognising new cultural dimension within the landscape around them and provide a sound basis for further study here or abroad. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2061. Cultural heritage management and tourism (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Understanding the relationship between cultural heritage management and tourism is important for planning and managing tangible cultural heritage in a sustainable manner. The course examines the underlying principles, goals and concepts that drive current cultural heritage management and tourism activity around the world. It will provide students with a framework for analysing the complementary and competing demands made by conservation and tourism of tangible cultural heritage. How such demands arise during the planning and development of a heritage attraction will be discussed throughout the course using examples from five continents. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2065. Urban planning: principles and practices (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to the subject of urban planning. It will first discuss the significance and objectives of urban planning, relating the rise of this profession to the changing configurations of our increasingly urbanizing world. Then, drawing upon primarily the experiences of the United States, some of the major concepts and issues relating to contemporary urban planning practice will be 298 deliberated. These include competing planning theories on the planning process, the legal basis of planning as well as the interrelationships between planning, politics and social issues. The questions of land use planning, urban design, urban renewal, and environmental planning will be highlighted and experiences from the United States and Hong Kong will be discussed and contrasted to illustrate the complexity of urban planning issues in different geographical, political and social settings. Students are strongly encouraged to take one of the basic foundation courses on urban geography before enrolling in this course. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2072. Environmental management: impact assessment (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The purpose of this course is to discuss the role of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) studies in the environmental decision-making process and as a means for better environmental management. The major components, processes, and attributes to EIA systems will be discussed throughout the lectures. The course will also introduce different methodologies in planning and managing of an EIA study. Applications of EIA system in the local context will be discussed in detail and illustrated by real-life examples mainly from Hong Kong. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2073. Principles of environmental management * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course will help students to understand major aspects of environmental management as a means for protecting natural and man-made environment. A range of concepts and methods in environmental management will be introduced. The major components, processes, and attributes to the environmental management process will be discussed. The market and government regulations associated with environmental management will also be presented. Considering the complex and dynamic nature of the environmental management process, applications of environmental, social, and economic methods in environmental management are discussed in detail and illustrated by real-life examples mainly from Hong Kong. Integrated approaches for identifying desirable policy options in environmental decision-making are also introduced. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2078. Urban geography I: growth, function and pattern of cities (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Human beings and their activities are increasingly concentrated in cities. A holistic examination of the city involves understanding its role, internal physical and social structure, and systems of activities. This is one of the two basic courses on urban geography. It covers basic topics of the forces and patterns of urbanization, central place theories, functions of cities, rank size rule, primacy and urban systems, and new urbanization features such as the world city and Extended Metropolitan Regions. It is basic to the understanding of the city and related urban issues and problems. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2079. Urban geography II: city structure and urban land use models (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening 299 purposes.) Human beings and their activities are increasingly concentrated in cities. A holistic examination of the city involves understanding its role, internal physical and social structure, and systems of activities. This is one of the two basic courses on urban geography. It deals with conventional urban land use models and the cultural and modern forces that shape the urban internal structures of different regions of today. It covers the conventional urban land use models, social areas, CBD, urban industrial location, urban renewal and the rural-urban fringe, urban structures of colonial cities, African cities, Islamic cities, Latin American cities, Chinese and Soviet cities, as well as the new city in the Information Age. The course will be useful for urban administration, planning and marketing. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2080. Regional geography of Europe (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Whereas physically Europe could arguably be regarded as just a part of Asia, it distinguishes itself culturally. So, the course first tries to define Europe and describe its characteristics. It does this by looking at cultures, landscapes and especially the cities. The fascinating thing about Europe is that as diverse historically, culturally and economically as it is, it chose to overcome differences and to actively engage in an unprecedented integration process. In its second part the course looks at this process and its political, economic and spatial implications. It links the European experience to globalisation and to integration processes in Asia. The last part of the course then explores the recent development of selected regions within Europe. Apart from introducing a unique continent to the participants the course provides an understanding of interrelated political and regional developments. Assessment: 100% coursework. GEOG2081. Sustainable urban transport (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces a new approach to apply the concept of sustainability to urban transport. It provides basic knowledge about the operation of urban transportation systems, urban transport planning and policy. Trends in population and urbanization will be associated closely with the patterns of travel behavior and demand, transport technology, and energy use. Personal mobility and accessibility in the urbanized developed and developing worlds will be explained with case studies from around the world. An introduction of trends in intercity travel and freight mobility bring this course further with a regional context, and examples are drawn from the Pearl River Delta as well as other mega-city regions. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2082. Economic development in rural China (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) China is still largely an agricultural country with an overwhelmingly rural population. This course examines China's rural and agricultural development issues from both developmental and geographical perspectives. It focuses on three parts of knowledge: basic theories in rural and agricultural development, existing condition and situation of Chinese agricultural production and the rural economy, and hot topics of debates on contemporary reform and development in Chinese countryside. Agricultural and rural problems, government policies and the associated impacts will be analyzed along with natural environment and condition. The course emphasizes the training of critical thinking and comprehensive analytical skills, as well as practical problem-solving ability. The course is primarily 300 organized into three parts: lectures, seminars and a fieldtrip. Part I are lectures, Part II are seminars presented by students, by topics and in groups, and Part III is a field excursion to China. Assessment: 40% coursework; 60% examination. GEOG2083. Sustainable cities: theory and praxis # (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) There has been a rapidly increasing literature, since the latter half of the 1990s, on how cities and urban development in general could be made compatible with sustainable development goals. This course will examine key issues, both theoretical and practical, pertaining to this topic--such as the relationship between cities and environmental justice, health, transport, industry, agriculture, planning, designing with nature and waste management. Discussion will also extend to the problem of how best to assess, measure, and monitor progress towards the achievement of sustainable development goals at the city and national levels. Comparing and contrasting various policy and planning approaches exemplified by a range of urban projects introduced and implemented in both developed and developing countries, an overall emphasis will be placed on how `sustainable cities' need to be considered within a regional and global context. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2085. North America * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Regions are collections of places defined and connected by physical and human characteristics through the process of human observation and analysis. They thus exhibit both unity and diversity in their constituent elements which is dynamic both in time and place. This course provides a basic understanding of the geographical mosaic that is the continent of North America using a regional construct. The basic approach taken is to provide pertinent information on the nature of and our understanding of the topic being examined North America's geographic profile, people, culture, economy, urban system, and its relationship with the rest of the world. The key points covered in this course will permit students to grasp enough of the fundamentals to enable further, more detailed, exploration of the issues through self-guided use of materials provided on the course web page. These materials include Supplementary Information, a Glossary of Important Terms, Questions to Ponder, Recommended Reading and hyperlinks to Web sites where additional information can be found. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2086. China's tourism resources and management (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course provides a comprehensive introduction to China's tourism resources and management. Through the study of the works by a multidisciplinary group of scholars, it explores China's burgeoning tourism industry. Students are encouraged to trace the historical evolution of China's tourism industry, particularly regarding the resources and management, so as to appreciate the achievements made, remaining problems, and prospects of future development. Assessment: 100% coursework. 301 GEOG2088. China: environment and sustainable development (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Due to its geographic characteristics and its large population, China is prone to natural resources degradation. Environmental problems have been accelerated by the rapid economic growth of recent years, high intensity of energy use, particularly in the industrial sector, and economic and pricing policies that have not taken into account the intrinsic value of the resources. These factors combine to cause over-exploitation of natural resources. This course comprises three main sections. Following the introduction, Section I provides an overview of the state of the country's natural environment. Section II focuses on the institution, legislative and administrative framework for environment protection and nature conservation. Finally, Section III discusses the government's strategy for the environment and sustainable development as stipulated in recent Five-Year plans and China's Agenda 21. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2089. The Pearl River Delta: development and interaction with Hong Kong (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) With the cross-boundary relocation of Hong Kong manufacturing activities, the Pearl River Delta (PRD) has experienced rapid economic growth, industrialization and urbanization since China's Opening and Reform initiated in the late 1970s. The PRD and Hong Kong have become inextricably linked together through the increasing cross-boundary movements of capital, people, goods, information and other activities especially since the 1990s. The objective of this course is to shed light on the significant changes in the PRD and economic restructuring in Hong Kong over the past two decades, as well as the socio-economic interaction between them. It examines the evolution and changing patterns of the regional integration under the unique framework of the "One Country Two Systems" (OCTS) and the institution-based endeavor marked by the "Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement" (CEPA) between the Mainland and Hong Kong. Emphasis is placed on the social, economic and political factors that account for the promising development and intensive interplay in the region. Assessment: 100% coursework. GEOG2090. Introduction to geographic information systems (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to the computer-assisted techniques of geographic data analysis, collectively known as GIS, which involve the overlaying and merging of spatial data layers. The principles of such an approach will be discussed focusing on the nature of the spatial data, raster and vector data structures, data transformation and geocoding, modeling techniques, and accuracy evaluation of spatial databases. Students must complete a simple project embodying the application of the GIS concept in a real-life situation. Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination. GEOG2091. Principles and practice of ecotourism (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Ecotourism is the result of increasing interest amongst consumers in exploring the natural world as an alternative to more conventional holidays, along with a desire to reduce the environmental and cultural 302 impact of their activities. This course introduces to students the basic principles and practices of ecotourism, including its prospects and problems from the points of view of host populations, tourist guests, environmentalists and tourism organisations. It leads students to examine the delicate interactions between tourism and the ecosystem by studying global ecotourism cases. It also encourages students to explore the prospects of ecotourism development in China through examining ecotourism practice in the country. Assessment: 100% coursework. GEOG2092. Freight transport management (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The geographic environment serves as home not only to systems involved in passenger transport and tourism, but also to a complex intermixture of systems devoted to the movement of freight. This course introduces the contribution and impact of such systems by reviewing the dimensions of the industry, the measurement of its impact, the modal variety of carriers, the managerial issues of pricing/costing/operations which carriers pursue, the technological and strategy issues of network design, information management, and shipper/carrier interaction; and the development of dynamic public policies which often involve regulation/ ownership/ international issues. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2093. Visitor management in parks, heritage sites, and recreation areas (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) Parks, heritage sites, and recreation areas increasingly serve as international tourist attractions and play an important role in the international tourism industry. Visitor use of these areas may contribute significantly to sustainable local communities. However, overuse of parks and protected areas by visitors may result in problems. Visitor management and the related issues of perception of service quality and customer satisfaction, therefore assumes an important role in parks, heritage sites, and recreation areas management. The course examines various concepts and strategies for visitor management of parks, heritage sites, and recreation areas. It also addresses the issue of assessing service quality and customer satisfaction for the management of diverse visitors. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2094. Locational changes of global economic activities # (6 credits) This course gives an introduction to competing theoretical interpretations of why economic activities are located where they are. Emphasis is placed on the processes of globalization, their geographical implications, and various theoretical attempts to understand the dynamics of the new economic landscape. Both topical and regional issues of economic geography are discussed and economic development at the global, national, and local scales are examined. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2095. Globalizing China II: economy, society, and regional development * (6 credits) China's space economy has undergone profound transformation over the past half a century. This course offers a selective evaluation of a number of issues that are critical to understanding China's ongoing economic and spatial transformation. Emphasis is placed on development strategies, agriculture, industry, transport, trade, and urban and regional development since 1949. The driving forces operating 303 behind the scenes of economic transformation and the (un)intended consequences are critically evaluated. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2096. Human impacts on ecosystems* (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BA students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course introduces students to the basic concepts of biogeography by studying the structure and functioning of natural ecosystems and their extensive modifications by human activities. It provides a comprehensive foundation on basic ecological concepts, including structure and organization of ecosystems, energy flow and nutrient cycling, evolution of the biosphere and ecosystem succession and changes. Some special issues of ecosystem management of relevance to nature conservation and protection are then expounded, including species interactions, biotic dispersal and migration, fire as a natural-cum-anthropic factor, continental drift and Pleistocene Glaciation, domestication and agricultural origin, the pervasive ecological impacts of modern agriculture and urbanization, and the application of island biogeography theory to habitat and species conservation. This is a course of general appeal to students with different backgrounds and dispositions. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2097. Global landforms # (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course is a core element in physical environmental study. The course provides a systematic description and analysis of earth surface landscapes and the processes that create them. Since earth Given that the Earth's land surface is located at the interface of the Earth's lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere, this study is closely related to a wide range of disciplines of natural environments. Topics discuss the landforms and their processes in different environments, including slope, fluvial, coastal, glacial and arid locations. The landforms created by tectonic movement and the techniques in geomorphology are also studied. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2098. Methods and techniques in spatial analysis (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course aims to introduce students to the research methodology and techniques commonly used in the discipline. This is a foundation course for research in geography. Following a discussion of the uses, implementation and limitations of surveys, various descriptive and inferential statistics of spatial concentration, associations and autocorrelation are introduced. Underlying concepts and theories are illustrated with practical applications in physical and human geography. Classroom teaching is supplemented by computer laboratory sessions, individual assignments and a group project. Abilities to evaluate survey reports critically and to apply spatial and non-spatial statistics appropriately are emphasized. Assessment: 100% coursework. GEOG2099. Sustainable use and management of soils * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening 304 purposes.) This course introduces students to soils as an integral component of the environment and a pertinent natural resource. It provides a broad foundation to basic concepts of soil as a natural body by assessing systematically the mineral and organic composition as well as their related properties. The physical organization of soils in the form of structure and its manipulation by humankind in the form of tillage are elucidated. Topics on the ability of soils to supply nutrients for plant growth, the use of different forms of chemical and organic fertilizers, and contamination of soils by pollutants, are covered. The importance of soil moisture and their maintenance at an optimal state are explained in the context of drainage and irrigation. The general degradation of soils due to human-accelerated erosion and other unsustainable activities are evaluated together with the prospects for proper ecological rehabilitation and conservation. The course contents and presentation are designed for students with arts, social sciences or science backgrounds. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2100. People, society and the internet # (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to the spatial implications of convergent information technology, broadly defined as computers and telecommunications. In particular, it examines the characteristics of digital communities in different parts of the world. This course begins by exploring the historical roots and geographical diffusion of the Internet. It then proceeds to examine the characteristics of digital communities in different parts of the world. Special emphasis is put on the typology of Internet information, the importance of Internet information production centers, and the strategies of promoting Internet development. Examples mainly come from the Asia-Pacific region. Assessment: 40% coursework; 60% examination. GEOG2101. Globalizing China I: resources, politics, and population (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This is an introductory course about the evolving physical, cultural and political landscape of China. Emphasis is placed on (a) the natural environment and physical setting for development; (b) historical geography and evolution of the landscape; (c) the political system and post-1949 development; and (d) the growth and spatial distribution of the Chinese population. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2102. Trees for green and liveable cities # (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course introduces students to trees as the most dominant element of the natural-green compartment of an urban ecosystem. As prominent landscape features and ecological contributors to biodiversities in human settlements, trees are surveyed with respect to composition and structure, environmental conditions for their existence, multiple benefits and functions that they can bring to city inhabitants, and general pattern of greenspaces in cities. Various stress factors dampening tree vigour in the trying urban environment in the above- and below-ground realms, and the resulting arboricultural problems, are considered. The practical management of trees in the urban landscape is elaborated with reference to species composition and selection to match different site conditions, tree planting techniques and subsequent care, tree preservation and transplanting, and the assessment and valuation of urban trees. By adopting a non-technical approach, students with arts, social sciences or science background with an 305 interest in the natural aspects of cities are targeted. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2103. Climate change and social responses * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The course provides a systematic description and analysis of past climate changes during human history, particularly in the last two thousand years. The impacts of these changes on human society would be studied based on the analysis of historical records, which include population changes, armed conflicts, harvest levels, diseases and political transitions. The course will discuss the current issues on global warming and its possible impacts on the future society and the human adaptive choices to the change. This course includes a compulsory field trip to archeological sites in China or southeast Asia. Assessment: 100% coursework. GEOG2104. Introduction to GIS in health studies # (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) The idea of applying GIS techniques in health-related studies is not new. Indeed, GIS has been used for more than a decade in the western countries and a flooding of applications in the health care sector reflects its significance. This course discusses how a GIS is used to address and analyze pressing health problems from the geographical perspective. It covers such topics as theoretical and practical issues, simple disease mapping, disease pattern analysis, and spatial modeling techniques. The course will be conducted in a series of lectures and hands-on practices in a problem-based learning environment. Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination. GEOG2105. Strategies of transport and infrastructural development * (6 credits) (This course is also offered to second and third year non-BSS students for inter-Faculty broadening purposes.) This course aims to encourage students to think about the role of transport in the economy critically. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the theoretical approaches and empirical evidences on the relationship between transport and the economy. Specific case studies are drawn extensively from different parts of the world. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the role of government in shaping the transport-development relationship and in promoting transport sustainability. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2106. Globalizing greater China: politics, economy, and society (6 credits) The emergence of China as a quasi-superpower in addition to the mainland's dynamic relationship with Taiwan, Hong Kong and overseas-Chinese communities will be one of the most important stories of the 21st century. Students will be introduced to the ways in which the forces of globalization are shaping the culture, mentality, as well as business practices of 1.3 billion Chinese. This course will also focus on the global significance of the "peaceful rise of China" in areas including the country's economic prowess and fast-growing Chinese influence in regions ranging from Africa to Latin America. Special attention will be paid to the interactions between the mainland on the one hand, and Taiwan and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region on the other. Students are encouraged to make their own assessment of the global significance of the possible formation of a Greater China civilization in the 306 coming decades. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2107. Geographical analysis of crime (6 credits) This course introduces students to the study of crime from a geographic perspective, with a focus on the use of spatial analysis techniques to identify, quantify, visualize, explain and predict the occurrence of crime in the global, regional and local settings. The course is organised in two parts. In the first part students will learn the fundamental theories of crime in the context of social ecology, behavioural geography, criminal opportunity and crime pattern theories. In the second part students will study crime mapping and crime analysis techniques including spatial statistics, spatial data mining, geo-visualisation, journey to crime, hot spot analysis, and geographic profiling of serial offenders. Students will learn to use geographic information systems (GIS) and crime analysis software packages to perform crime analysis for applications in law enforcement and community development. The emphasis of the course is on the dynamic interaction between the social and physical environments underlying the occurrence of crime and the residence and movement of criminals. This course aims to provide a sound conceptual and technical foundation for students who plan to pursue further academic study in the spatio-temporal characteristics of crime, as well as those who wish to prepare themselves for a career as a professional crime analyst in criminal justice, law enforcement and private investigation agencies. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2108. Land economy, administration and resource management (6 credits) This course is designed using a multidisciplinary approach with geography and geographic/land information as the common threads. In essence, the course is made up of three components: (1) Land economic theories, which will discuss key land economic theories with a focus on the spatial distribution, pattern and development of land and land-related resources; (2) Land administration: which will explain the evolution of land administration institutions that govern and regulate the development of land and land-related resources; (3) Land and resource management: which will examine the application of land economic theories and the role of land administration institutions in public policy making pertaining to land use planning, resource management, regional economic development, environmental conservation and land reform. The course will draw on examples of land administration institutions and resource management practices in North America, Australia and Western Europe, and examine the transferability of these institutions and practices to Hong Kong, China and selected developing countries. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2109 Changing Population Structure in Modern Society (6 credits) This course aims to provide students with a fundamental understanding of human population issues and problems in our contemporary world from a geographical perspective. Major concepts, theories and definitions in Population Geography will first be introduced, and the patterns and trends in fertility, mortality and migration of human populations in different parts of the world will be illustrated. A variety of empirical cases will be used to demonstrate how population issues are both shaped by and engender economic, political, social, cultural and environmental changes. Major topics investigated in the course include: high level of fertility in poor countries, ageing population in advanced economies, internal and international migration, the HIV-AIDS pandemic and other major health problems. Policies adopted to address these population-related issues will also be discusses and analysed. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. 307 GEOG2110 Tourism Policy and Planning (6 credits) This course aims at demonstrating the critical importance of tourism policy to the competitiveness and sustainability of a destination and relates tourism planning to policy. The course outlines the structure, content and formation of tourism policy and relates planning within ecologically sensitive landscape and areas to policy. The planning and management strategies are to be articulated in the context of social, economic and environmental impacts of tourism. Special emphasis is given to national parks and protected areas worldwide. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. GEOG2111 Transnationalism, Global Citizenship and Social Cohesion (6 credits) This course aims to introduce the students to the key aspects of international migration from a geographical perspective. The course will begin by introducing major migration theories and tracing the historical development of international migration in different parts of the world. Migration flows will be analysed in relationship to processes that stretch different geographical regions and scales, including colonialism, globalisation of the economy, political and environmental changes. The increasingly transnational characteristic of contemporary migration flows will be highlighted and scrutinised. The course will then proceed to investigate concepts of citizenship, drawing upon theories in Political Geography and Social Geography regarding state, nation, territory, boundaries, transnationalism, identity, home and sense of belonging. By examining migration experiences in different parts of the world, the course will also discuss and analyse the potential, challenges and strategies in enhancing social cohesion in increasingly multi-cultural societies. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG2112 Cultural and Social Geography (6 credits) Students will be familiarised with the foundation of Cultural and Social Geography, and learn to make sense of the mutually constitutive relationship between people and their environments. In this course, students will explore how cultures are geographically expressed and how geography is a basic element in the making of culture. The course will begin with a survey of the main theoretical shifts in the discipline throughout the 20th century. With such conceptual understanding as background, students will examine an array of empirical cases to appreciate the role of space, place and culture in relation to social issues, cultural politics, identity and community and other aspects of daily life. Major topics investigated include: cultural landscape, language, religion, ethnicity, culture and heritage as tourism resource, cultural politics in colonial and post-colonial eras, and culture in the age of globalisation. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. GEOG3009. Honours dissertation (12 credits) The basis of the honours dissertation should normally be the analysis of a problem through fieldwork or through library documentary study under the supervision of an assigned teacher. The object of the dissertation is for students to demonstrate a mastery of geographical field and practical techniques within the scope of the chosen study. Studies undertaken should be based on courses taken in the second-year. Staff may specify subjects considered suitable for study. The dissertation course begins in the January of the second-year of study and must be completed by January of the third-year. The completed dissertation should be typed with double-line spacing on A4 sheets, and not exceeding 10,000 words in length (excluding figures and tables). Assessment: 100% dissertation. 308 GEOG3027. Directed project (6 credits) The basis of the directed project should normally be the analysis of a problem through fieldwork. The object of the directed project is for students to demonstrate a mastery of geographical field and practical techniques for a well-bound topic. Projects undertaken should be based on courses taken in the second year. Staff may specify topics considered suitable for small-scale investigation. Internship are subject to availability and interview by prospective employers arranged by the Department. Students are required to turn in a written report, typed with double-line spacing on A4 sheets and not exceeding 3,500 words in length (excluding figures and tables). An oral presentation of their completed work will be scheduled in the first week of the following semester. Assessment: 80% Written report (and employer assessment in the case of internship), 20% oral presentation. No teaching is required for this course. Students must submit completed report by the first week of December and give an oral presentation in the first week of the following semester. GEOG3028. Overseas field trip (6 credits) This `required' course is open ONLY to geography major students and requires them to complete one `two weeks' overseas residential field camp in the summer after the second-year of study, and to produce a field work report on the field trip which will be assessed by the teachers leading the field trip groups. IMPORTANT NOTICE: Geography majors, who have participated in the overseas field trip and enrolled in this course and who subsequently change their course enrolment in such a way that they would no longer be Geography majors will be deemed to have FAILED to meet the requirements of this course, since they will no longer be Geography majors. In such a situation, the enrolment of those students in GEOG3028 will become INVALID and they will be required to replace it with another 6-credit course in order to fulfill their degree requirement. Assessment: 100% field report. GEOG3035. Advanced urban survey (6 credits) Prerequisite: Either GEOG2078. Urban geography I: growth, function and pattern of cities Or GEOG2079 Urban geography II: city structure and urban land use models The course examines the divergent forces shaping urbanization and growth of different parts of the world and the responses of various national governments to such dynamics and their consequences. This is done through lectures and small group discussions on conventional urbanization theories, globalization and national urbanization. Examples will be taken from developed countries such as United Kingdom and USA, socialist countries such as China, and Third World countries such as India and South Korea. Each student will need to choose one country for a case study. He/she will be directed by the lecturer to do the basic reading and to collect the necessary data. Through the case study, he/she has to apply the general theories, concepts and methodologies learned in the lectures in a participatory manner. He/she has to present the case study as a project report in the form of a long essay of about 5,000 words, which is the basis of coursework assessment. The course will be useful for advanced and professional studies in human geography, planning and social sciences in general. Assessment: 100% coursework. (Each student has to present a case study as a project report in the form of a long essay of about 5,000 words.) Department of Politics and Public Administration 309 Unless otherwise specified, the final grading for each course will be determined by performance in the examination and assessment of coursework in a ratio to be announced by individual course instructors at the beginning of each semester. The weighting of examination ranges from 40-60% of total course assessment. POLI0001. A special topic in political science (6 credits) This course is offered from time to time. Students should consult the Department on the content of the unit on offer. POLI0002. A special topic in political theory (6 credits) Each year (if possible) a political theory course will be offered under this heading. The topic chosen will depend upon the interests of staff and students. Students should consult the Department on the content of the course on offer. POLI0003. Approaches to foreign policy analysis (6 credits) The process by which states arrive at foreign policy positions is the central focus of this course. Examples will be drawn largely from the U.S.A., China and the United Kingdom. Major crises and events will be studied in some detail to underline the action - reaction nature of foreign policy. The course is intended for those who have studied International Politics in a previous semester. POLI0004. Bureaucracy and the public (6 credits) This course examines the political, legal and social dimensions of interaction between bureaucracies and the public. Consideration will be given to the effectiveness of complaint-handling institutions, such as the ombudsman, Freedom of Information Acts, secrecy provisions and the roles played by street-level bureaucrats. POLI0005. Capitalism and social justice (6 credits) This course discusses the morality of capitalism with reference to such issues as exploitation, social justice and equality. Topics include the philosophical defence of free-market capitalism, egalitarian theories of social justice, Marxist critique of capitalism, the concept of exploitation, and welfare rights. POLI0006. China and Hong Kong: the politics of transition (6 credits) The development of relations between China and Hong Kong since 1982 is critical to our understanding of Hong Kong's current political problems. This course focuses on the Basic Law, autonomy, democratization, and Hong Kong's political, economic and legal interaction with China. POLI0009. Comparative politics (6 credits) This course introduces students to the methods and issues of comparative politics. It will examine the logic and method of comparative politics and some key issues in the comparative study of political behaviour, institutions and processes, such as political culture, political participation, political parties, intergovernmental relations, state-society relations and political development. 310 POLI0010. Democracy and its critics (6 credits) This course discusses basic and practical issues concerning the nature, justification, and limits of democracy. Topics include the concept and foundations of democracy, participatory democracy, the elitist challenge to democracy, Marxist critique of capitalist democracy, rational choice approaches to democracy, and others. POLI0012. East Asian political economy (6 credits) This course aims to examine the political processes that underlie the rapid economic transformation of East Asian countries. We will mainly cover Japan and the newly industrializing economies, namely Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea, but comparisons with China and other emerging economies such as Malaysia and Thailand will also be made. We will first introduce the salient features of the East Asian model of development and we will then analyze the pattern of political development, the relations between the state and other political actors, the development of administrative system, as well as the impact of international relations and strategic factors on the domestic political and economic processes of these cases. Eligibility: Students taking or having taken FOSS0010 are not allowed to take this course. POLI0013. Elections and representative democracy (6 credits) This course examines the relationship between various aspects of elections and representative democracy. Electoral systems, various aspects of the electoral process, the role of representatives, among other topics, will be studied in relation to democratic principles and theories of representation. Examples will be drawn from both Hong Kong and other political systems. POLI0015. Ethics and public affairs (6 credits) This course examines major public issues in contemporary societies from the perspectives of ethics and political theory. It aims to enhance students' abilities to critically analyze controversial ethical issues in public affairs. Topics include the nature and methods of moral arguments, major approaches in ethics and political theory, and selected studies of current public issues in the fields of global ethics, market ethics, and political and administrative ethics. POLI0016. Gender and development (6 credits) This course introduces the gender dimension to the study of development, especially in an era of globalization. It begins with an overview of the articulation of gender concerns in western development theory and practice in the last three decades, and explores in greater depth the gendered impact of certain key processes at work today. They include war and nation building, the debt crisis, global economic restructuring and labour migration, global governance and the international women's movement. Eligibility: Students taking or having taken FOSS0004 are not allowed to take this course. POLI0017. Government and business (6 credits) This course explores the interplay between government and business within major East Asian countries 311 and how regional economic dynamism is shaping regional international relations in East Asia. The theoretical focus is on how government policy affects the market and how economic forces shape government political decisions. At the international level, it seeks to examine the political basis of regional economic integration and the economic foundation of international political cooperation in East Asia. Issue areas for this course include: the economic dynamism in East Asia, sub-regional economic growth circles, patterns of trade and investment, APEC, and security challenges and economic regionalism. POLI0018. The Japanese way of politics (6 credits) The main questions to be addressed in this course include: What are the main characteristics of the Japanese democracy? How does it differ from other liberal democracies? Why had the LDP maintained its long-lasting rule between 1955 and 1993? What is the role of the bureaucracy in Japanese politics? How does the business community exert its political influence? What are the main characteristics of the Japanese political culture? How do ordinary Japanese and social groups exercise their political power? What are the main sources of political change in the 1990s? What contributed to the end of the LDP's dominance in national politics? What are the main changes in the electoral system? How do the Japanese political culture and domestic politics affect Japanese foreign relations? POLI0019. Hong Kong and the world (6 credits) Hong Kong's international character has been vital to its prosperity and vitality. While Hong Kong's `foreign affairs portfolio' is controlled by China, Hong Kong retains considerable autonomy in shaping its international destiny. What global course should Hong Kong leaders chart? This class will examine the Special Administrative Region's unique international status, its complex identity as a Chinese world city, and its track record in facing the challenges and opportunities associated with today's highly interdependent global system. POLI0020. Hong Kong politics (6 credits) This course focuses on the legal, political and institutional structure of the Hong Kong government. The political culture and attitudes of the Hong Kong people are discussed. Other topics include the Chief Executive, legislative politics, constitutional politics, public opinion, pressure groups, political parties, mass media, and Beijing's policy toward Hong Kong. POLI0021. Understanding global issues (6 credits) This is an introductory course on world politics. The purpose of this course is to help students to understand major global issues and familiarize them with basic concepts, approaches, and controversies in international relations studies. As we are living in a 'shrinking' world characterized by unprecedented levels of global interdependence, the course will also focus on the processes and impacts of globalization on international relations. Some of the issues studied in the course will include humanitarian intervention, global economic governance, poverty and inequality, international security threats, and transnational environmental problems. The course also covers issues such as the role of the U.S in world politics, or post-war international system shaped by the US. Eligibility: Students taking or having taken FOSS0013 are not allowed to take this course. POLI0022. Governing China (6 credits) This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese politics. The main objective is to understand 312 the ideology, institutions and processes of the contemporary Chinese political system and explore the socio-economic consequences, achievements, and problems of Chinese socialism. POLI0023. Issues in contemporary Chinese politics (6 credits) An overview of some recent policy changes in China which are studied in the light of two main themes: the different ways in which political power is manifested, and the changing perceptions of ways in which governance of the state can best be effected: and to what ends. POLI0024. Issues in public administration (6 credits) This course offers an opportunity for students to examine current issues in public administration, particularly those facing the Hong Kong government. POLI0025. Managerial skills in public organizations (6 credits) This course focuses on the activities and functions of managers in public organizations. Emphasis is put on the environment and context within which public managers operate, and the various managerial skills and tools that are essential to effective public managers. Students are expected to acquire skills to manage conflicts, lead, manage resources, communicate, and make decisions in the context of public organizations. Reference is made to the experiences in various public or non-profit organizations in Hong Kong. POLI0027. Public policy-making: theories and application (6 credits) This course is designed to introduce students to major theoretical frameworks that have been devised to understand and explain public policy-making. The main questions asked are: why are certain policies made instead of others? What are the major factors that affect public policy-making? Empirical studies from both Hong Kong and elsewhere are included to illustrate the application of the theories. [Students wishing to take this course will normally have taken first year introductory courses in our department. Students are free to take the course from their third semester onward, but as the course involves some level of difficulty, it may be advisable to take the course after the 4th semester.] POLI0031. Politics of economic reform in China (6 credits) This course examines the politics of economic reform in contemporary China. Issues covered include the connections between politics and economics, the political debates over economic reforms, the rationale and themes of the economic reform programme and the social and political consequences resulting from the implementation of these reforms. Reform policies to be studied include rural reform, enterprise reform, central-local relations as well as foreign economic policy. POLI0033. Problems of the Third World (6 credits) This course explores the concept and dynamics of "development" through considering a range of concrete problems that have assumed primacy in the Third World today. Issues discussed will include ethnic conflict and displacement; poverty and inequality; foreign aid and neoliberal globalization; urbanization and environmental destruction; and civil society and democratization. 313 POLI0034. Public administration in China (6 credits) This course aims to provide a critical introduction to public administration in contemporary China. Key topics that will be covered include the organization of the political system, policy-making and implementation, management and reform of the civil service, local government, public finance, and the relationship between government and business. The political and administrative implications of China's integration into the world economy will also be examined. POLI0035. Public administration in Hong Kong (6 credits) Public administration in Hong Kong has been going through a series of reform over the last decade or so. This course introduces students to the major issues confronting the bureaucracy, in particular its relationships to other actors in the political system and questions of accountability. POLI0037. Managing people in public organizations (6 credits) The course examines the environment, institutions, processes and issues involved in the management of people in public organizations, particularly the Hong Kong government. Comparisons are made to the experience of managing people in public organizations overseas. POLI0038. Public policy and democracy (6 credits) This course examines arguments for a more fundamental rethinking about the proper roles of government, community organizations, and citizens in public policy-making and new forms of service delivery. Potential consequences of public sector reforms for program effectiveness as well as for political and social citizenship will be considered. POLI0039. Public policy analysis (6 credits) This is an introductory course in the production of advice for public decisions and actions. This course emphasizes both the art and craft of policy analysis. The "art" dimension focuses on the skills in defining problems for analysis. The "craft" dimension, on the other hand, is concerned with theories, skills, and techniques that can be used to analyze, design, and assess policy options. Illustration is made with reference to policy problems in Hong Kong. POLI0040. Public sector management (6 credits) This course examines the structural design and operation of the public sector as well as public organizations. Issues such as the use of various forms of organization in public service delivery, the adoption of corporatization and privatization, and public sector reform will be addressed. Reference is made to the experience in Hong Kong. POLI0041. Research methods for politics and public administration (6 credits) Relevant, valid and reliable information is essential in making sound political and administrative decisions. This course examines issues on research design, measurement and scaling, sampling, and data collection and analysis, with emphasis on methods commonly used by politicians and public 314 administrators such as mailed questionnaires, telephone interviews and focus groups. The course also examines the use of opinion polls, interpretation of poll results, and their effects on elections. POLI0044. American democracy (6 credits) The political system of the United States is often touted as the quintessential democracy in the world. While the democratic ideals embodied in the system have inspired many, the system also contains some important flaws. This course is to put the political system to the test. What are the philosophical foundations of the political system? What role does American political culture play? How are the powers divided among different branches of federal and state governments? How do individuals and interest groups exercise political power? How does the system work? To answer these questions and others, we will examine the philosophical foundations, working mechanisms, and major controversies associated with the American political system. POLI0045. The political economy of the European Union (6 credits) This course examines the political and economic dimension of the European Union. It will include a consideration of its political history, structure, policies and the effects of the market on national politics and economics. POLI0046. Thesis in politics or public administration (12 credits) The thesis will consist of an investigation into a relevant aspect of politics or public administration which must be chosen in consultation with the supervisor before July 1 in the year preceding the final examination. The thesis must be submitted before April 1 of the following year. Assessment: 100% coursework. POLI0047. United States foreign policy (6 credits) How does one make sense of the seeming "arrogance" of U.S. foreign policy? By enhancing student understanding of the causes and consequences of American international political choices, this course seeks to groom well-informed and objective critics of U.S. foreign policy.The course will examine the intellectual foundations associated with and the domestic political actors involved in U.S. international policy formulation and implementation. Students will then have the opportunity to apply this knowledge in a critical evaluation of some of the major international policy decisions made by the U.S. since WWII. The course will conclude with a discussion of the future of U.S. foreign policy, paying particular attention to the impact of the 9-11 attacks on the American world view. POLI0050. Women and politics (6 credits) This course asks why gender matters in politics and how women's integration into political life is important to the fulfillment of democratic citizenship. It will examine shortfalls in reality and seek to understand the processes whereby most women "vanish" from public decision making. Drawing from progressive experiences in different parts of the world, the course explores ways in which politics could be made more women-friendly, and how women's participation could help transform the nature and content of politics. POLI0051. Issues in Chinese political philosophy (6 credits) 315 A comparative study of Chinese and Western political philosophy, with special emphasis on Confucianism and liberalism. Topics include the nature of classical Confucian political thought, the developments of the Confucian traditions in response to local political changes and to the challenges presented by western liberalism, the contemporary discourse on Confucianism and human rights, freedom, and democracy, and other related issues. Reference will be made to Chinese materials. POLI0052. International relations of East Asia (6 credits) This course helps students to have a better understanding of major trends and issues in international relations of East Asia. Instead of providing a comprehensive survey of the history, culture, and national policies of countries in the region, it mainly addresses four issues in the course: What are major trends in regional IR? What is the source of conflict in the region? What are the common interests that unite peoples and states of East Asia? How does the region organize itself? It explains dynamics and patterns of regional international relations in a broad geopolitical and geoeconomic context. Topics in discussion include major powers' role in the region, the Korean Peninsula, the Taiwan Strait, ASEAN, Southeastern Asia and regional institution-building. POLI0058. Managing the global economy (6 credits) This course examines the interaction of politics and economics in international relations with reference to the world economy's most dynamic region the Asia-Pacific. It identifies the political considerations in global economic relations and analyzes the impact of economic factors on international relations. The course addresses four major areas. First, different theoretical perspectives on the free market global economy such as free trade versus environmental protection and competing priorities in different countries. Second, the key institutions in the global economic system the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade Organization (WTO). Third, critical issues in East Asia such as the role of the state in economic management, security and political factors in international economic relations and the prospects of regional economic co-operation. Finally, the major political challenges arising from economic conflicts in individual countries in the Asia-Pacific region. POLI0059. China and the world (6 credits) China's place in the world has changed dramatically since the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949. How do we account for the transformation of the country's position from being a Soviet ally challenging the West, to an independent radical revolutionary state, and then reform-minded country eager to join the international community? As communism collapsed elsewhere after the end of the Cold War China is becoming an emerging global power practising "socialism with Chinese characteristics". How do we understand and analyze China's relations with the rest of the world? This course examines China's interaction with the rest of the world since 1949, with reference on competing perspectives including power-political, economic inter-dependence and historical-cultural analysis. The course concludes with a critical assessment of China's position in a globalizing world. POLI0060. Public financial management (6 credits) The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of financial management in the public sector from a theoretical and practical perspective. The focus is primarily on the conceptual, methodological and institutional aspects of public expenditure and revenue management. The subject is approached largely from an economic standpoint, but there is also some exposure to accounting principles. However, no previous knowledge of either economics or accounting is assumed. 316 POLI0061. Hong Kong and South China: the political economy of regional development and cooperation (6 credits) The growing integration between Hong Kong and south China has profound implications not only for this region, but also for China and Asia as a whole. This course aims to analyze such an important development and its many implications. It is divided into three parts. Part I offers an overview of the development of the south China region. Theoretical approaches in the study of regionalism, intergovernmental relations and globalization and their relevance for understanding south China will also be examined . Part II analyses the social, economic and political links between Hong Kong and Greater China and the development experience of south China since the late 1970s. Part III will focus on several key issues in regional development and cooperation in the south China region, including intergovernmental cooperation mechanisms, economic and technological development, demographic flows, boundary control, transportation and infra-structural development, as well as environmental management. POLI0062. Political analysis (6 credits) This senior division course is designed for politics and public administration majors for whom it is compulsory. Based on classical texts in political science and public administration that illustrate the methods of our discipline, the course teaches the skills of political analysis. Students will examine topics such as political culture, bureaucracy, revolution, democracy, social capital, political system, public choice, war and peace, and so forth. Assessment:40% examination, 60% coursework. POLI0063. Performance and accountability in the public sector (6 credits) This course examines the ideas and practices of `contractualism' in the Public Sector, between and within bureaus, with external providers of public services and with the general public as users of those services. Its focus is on the role of `performance' (standards, measurement and evaluation) as a key management tool in the contract environment. The course explores the potential value of these developments for public sector accountability. POLI0064. Governance and law (6 credits) This course seeks to understand why the state regulates certain activities and behaviour in society, what different forms of regulation exist, when and what kind of legal regulation is deemed necessary, how legal regulation is enforced, and checks and balances against abuse in enforcement. This course is jointly taught by staff from the Department of Politics and Public Administration and the Department of Law. The main objective of the course is to explore the interface between the study of Politics and Law in understanding governance. Relevant case studies will be included for illustration and discussion. To take this course, students must have successfully completed POLI1002 Fundamentals of public administration and LLAW2002/LLAW3093 Administrative Law. BSocSc(Government and Laws) students are allowed to take either POLI0064 or LLAW3080 to fulfill the respective programme requirements for the Department of Politics and Public Administration or the Department of Law. POLI0065. Public organization and management (6 credits) This course will examine the fundamental theories of (i) organizational behaviours; (ii) organizational structures; (iii) decision making processes; and (iv) organizational management with particular 317 emphasis on public organizations. To substantiate the validity of the theories, emphasis is placed on the application of theory to various organizational settings including public and nonprofit organizations, and the local, state and federal levels of bureaucracies. At the end of the course, students will have obtained the ability to develop critical perspectives on the modus operandi of organizations and to formulate problem-solving mechanisms under complex decision-making situations. POLI0066. Public administration and the public (6 credits) "Government is an instrument of the public for acting collectively." What distincts public administration from business administration is the notion of "the public". In the age of New Public Management, however, the distinctiveness and the identity of "the public" seem to have been largely lost. This course seeks to (1) rediscover the "public" in public administration by analyzing various plausible conceptions of the public in relation to public administration, for example, as constituents, clients, customers, and citizens; and (2) evaluate the respective forms and potential for public participation in the processes of administration in these conceptions. POLI0067. Liberalism and its limits (6 credits) This course explores a set of fundamental issues in liberalism. Liberalism, which is arguably the most influential tradition of political theory today, is about the proper scope of individual freedom and state power. Some of the issues to be discussed in this course are: What is freedom and what is its ground? Under what conditions should the state interfere with individual freedom? Should the state ban or discourage unethical or worthless ways of life? Should the state coerce people for their own good? Should we have the freedom to exclude people whom we don't like? What is so valuable about personal autonomy? The course aims to assess the strengths and limits of liberalism by examining the arguments for and against the liberal views on these issues. POLI0069 Public policy, politics and social change (6 credits) It is a common belief that public policies aim to control socially harmful behavior and to advance desirable, collective societal ends. Contrary to this belief, some policies have only served as tools to strengthen political and economic power of certain groups (or countries) at the expense of others. This course examines this dark side of public policies by addressing critical questions that include: whose interests are reflected in the policies? what are the institutional sources of policies/decisions? how does the powerful manipulate public opinion? who benefits and who pays for the costs of these policies in what ways? etc. By exploring answers to these questions, students are expected to identify sources of widespread injustice in contemporary societies. To conceptualize the core ideas, the course engages in the analysis of propaganda techniques, U.S. foreign policy, and the distribution of hazardous wastes, etc. The course will consist of a combination of lectures and group discussions. Active class participation is required. POLI0070. Language and advice in politics and public administration (6 credits) How does language relate to political life and the practice of public administration? The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study and use of languagein politics and public administration. This course will introduce students to the use of political language as an important part of political practice and political philosophy. Students will be introduced to the idea of political language as an historically and culturally contingent form of communication that shapes and is shaped by the institutions of the state. Students will come to understand theimportance of deploying political 318 language clearly for the task of advising political leaders on policy choices while facing civil servants and ordinary citizens. Students will apply the knowledge they gain in this course to their political environment by composing letters and/or memos offering advice to political and civil service leaders on important policy matters currently facing Hong Kong. POLI0071. International political theory (6 credits) The course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the main moral issues in international affairs, such as the just war theory, coercion and authority in international politics, global economic justice, terrorism, universal human rights, global citizenship, and so forth. Department of Psychology In addition to class sessions, each course may include a practical element on which candidates may expect to spend about two hours per week. The final grading for each course will be determined by performance in the examination and by assessment of coursework in a ratio of 40% coursework, 60% examination, unless otherwise specified. PSYC0001. Research methods in psychology (6 credits) (For candidates admitted in or before the academic year 2005-2006) This course adopts a practical approach to teaching the analytical aspects of research techniques in psychology. It is designed to provide students with the basic background in research design and data analysis. The logic of statistical inference and scientific explanation, the merits and limitations of quantitative approaches to the study of psychological phenomena, and research ethics will all be discussed. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or PSYC1002 or PSYC1003. PSYC0002. Psychological testing and measurement (6 credits) This course surveys the major concepts and techniques in the field of psychometrics, and provides students with some hands-on experience with commonly used tests. Topics covered include: the context of testing and measurement; the testing process; test standardization; reliability and validity; intelligence and its appraisal; personality assessment; special domain testing; occupational applications; large-scale measurements; ethics and prospects. Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. PSYC0005. Introduction to counselling and therapeutic psychology (6 credits) Provides a theoretical foundation for students who wish to learn the fundamentals of counselling or to explore their potential for professional training in mental health. Some experiential learning will be used. Major approaches; skills and practice; ethics and limitations of counselling. Working with various clinical and non-clinical populations. Cultural values and socio-political contexts. Outcome and process research. Students with personality and abnormal psychology knowledge preferred. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. 319 PSYC0007. Cognitive psychology (6 credits) This course covers how humans learn to deal with information from the environment. Topics include various aspects of perception, memory, concept structure and learning, and thinking. Students will be involved in conducting experiments on cognitive functioning as part of the coursework. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or PSYC1002; and PSYC1004. (BCogSc students exempt from PSYC1004) PSYC0008. Advanced cognitive psychology (6 credits) This course covers some recent approaches in the field of cognitive psychology. Topics may include the cognitive unconscious in perception and memory, conditioning versus cognitive learning in humans, neural networks and information processing, as well as other topics reflecting the interests of the teacher. Students will each do an independent empirical research project. Priority will be given to UG students major in psychology. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisites: PSYC1004 and PSYC0007. (BCogSc students exempt from PSYC1004) PSYC0009. Life-span developmental psychology (6 credits) This course provides an introduction to developmental psychology from a life-span perspective. The topics include: basic concepts and theories of human development; research methodology and issues in the study of developmental change; biological, environmental and social influences on development; processes of physical development over the life-span; attachment and emotional development; development of perception, language, cognition and morality; development of personality and social relationships. Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination. Prerequisites: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003 PSYC0010. History and issues in psychology (6 credits) An examination of some of the major issues and controversies in the history of psychology which are important for the current debate and its continuation. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. PSYC0016. The psychology of stress and health (6 credits) This course adopts a biopsychosocial approach in exploring current issues and research on stress and health. Special emphasis is placed on the Hong Kong situation. Topics covered include: concepts of stress; the roles of cognition, personality and physiology in the stress response; social stressors; coping, stress management and health promotion; concepts of health and wellness; cultural implications. Students in this course shall undertake independent research projects. Assessment: 100% coursework. PSYC0017. Motivation and achievement (6 credits) This course is an introduction to theories and research on achievement motivation. The course will cover a variety of topics including: motivation as a personal trait; situational causes of motivation; cognition and motivation; sociocultural influences on motivation and achievement; the role of meaning in motivation; sex differences in achievement and work investment; age and achievement motivation; enhancing motivation in learning. 320 Prerequisites: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003; and either PSYC0019 or PSYC0020 or PSYC0035. PSYC0019. Psychology of personality (6 credits) This course will critically examine and attempt a synthesis of a number of theories of personality as exemplified in the lives of some of the significant figures in the field. The relationship of specific theories to practical applications, personality assessment and psychotherapeutic techniques may be included. The major aims of the course are to provide a survey of the breath and complexity of this field and to provide a perspective from which to examine assumptions about human nature and the evaluation of behaviour. Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination. Prerequisites: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. PSYC0020. Fundamentals of social psychology (6 credits) The course gives an overview of the field which studies the behaviour of individuals in social contexts. It covers social perception, social cognition, social motivation, attitudes and attitude change, relationship between attitude and behaviour, aggression, helping, interpersonal attraction, social influence on individual behaviour and group dynamics. The impact of Chinese culture on various social behaviours will form part of the discussion. Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or PSYC1002 or PSYC1003. PSYC0022. Biological psychology (6 credits) This course provides an introduction to biological aspects of behaviour. The topics include: biological bases of behaviour, development, learning, memory, and abnormal psychology; the nervous system; processes of brain maturation; psychophysiology. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or PSYC1002. PSYC0023. Psychology of human communication (6 credits) This course is a laboratory course in applied social psychology. It examines the cognitive and interpersonal bases of human communication. Topics include: the cognitive and interpersonal processes involved in message formulation and comprehension; the communicative functions of nonverbal behaviour such as filled pauses and hand gestures; the cognitive and social consequences of language use; and social cognitive models of persuasive communication. Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. PSYC0029. Cognitive development (6 credits) This course will explore the development of our cognitive abilities and capacities through early childhood, when the most complex and interesting changes occur. Cognition, in the form of problem-solving, memory, attention, categorization, language and so on, is at the core of what makes us human. Changes in these abilities are closely related to developments in our physical, motor, and perceptual capacities, as well as to social and emotional growth. Our understanding of the development of a person's ability to think, reason and conceptualize has advanced significantly in the past few decades. We will examine both the findings and experimental methods of recent research on these topics. 321 Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. PSYC0032. Engineering psychology (6 credits) This course examines how knowledge in experimental/cognitive psychology is applied to the design of man-machine interface, tools, games, consumer products, etc. Students will appreciate how better designs lead to positive outcomes such as higher user satisfaction, lower accident rate, and lower job stress. Topics include human skills, motor theory, human-computer interaction, safety and health, work design, attention, and performance. Most recent psychological studies on advanced technologies such as virtual reality and three-dimensional displays will be introduced. Students will also learn from site visits how such designs are implemented in real settings. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisites: PSYC1001and either PSYC1004 or PSYC0001. PSYC0035. Introduction to educational psychology (6 credits) This course focuses on how psychological theories are applied to learning, teaching, and facilitation of human growth. The topics include major developmental theories and their application to learning and instruction, learning theories from both behavioral and cognitive traditions, effective teaching methods and practices, learners' individual and group differences, achievement motivation, and assessment. Students will be involved in learning activities that require self-reflection and integration of daily life experience. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. PSYC0036. Special topics in psychology (6 credits) This course provides an opportunity to study in some depth an area of psychology of interest to students and a staff member alike. Individual topics may have special requirements for eligibility. Students taking this course may select one topic from the list of topics to be announced in the semester immediately prior to that in which they are taken. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or PSYC1002 or PSYC1003. PSYC0038. Psychology of language and bilingualism (6 credits) A study of the processes involved in language comprehension and production, including the acquisition of a native as well as second language. The cognitive bases of language learning and use, the psychology of reading and reading disabilities, the comparison of psychological aspects of the Chinese language and other languages. Cognitive functions of the bilingual, the bilingual brain, psychological factors in second language learning. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. PSYC0040. Cross-cultural psychology (6 credits) The rationale, scope, and history of cross-cultural psychology. Conceptual issues and research methods. Cultural relativism and the search for universals. The emic-etic distinction. Comparability of test scores across cultures. Non-Western approaches and contributions. Cross-cultural studies in personality, cognition, social behaviour, and psychopathology. Current status, applications, and ethical issues. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. 322 PSYC0041. Consumer psychology (6 credits) This course examines the psychological processes underlying consumer buying behaviour and the cultural and social factors mediating these processes. Consumer behaviour will be studied from four psychological perspectives: motivational, information processing, attitude and attitude change, and decision-making. Students will learn to apply these perspectives to Hong Kong cases through exercises and mini project(s). The course offers both theoretical and practical orientations to marketing and market analysis. Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. PSYC0050. Knowing and acting in everyday life (6 credits) This course investigates knowing and acting as an integral process by which we construct our experiences and interact with the world to maintain our well-being. Pragmatic approaches to knowledge ranging from Western empiricism to postmodern constructionism. Taoism and Buddhism are introduced. Students are encouraged to practice what they have learned by becoming more aware of their own acts of knowing and their consequences in everyday life. Projects and tutorial discussions are designed to aid this practice. PSYC0051. Perception (6 credits) An introduction to sensation and perception, with an emphasis on the psychology of seeing. Specific topics include the following: examination of the functional properties of sensory systems (e.g., auditory system, color vision, vestibular system, touch and kinaesthesia); phenomenology of sensation and perception; psychophysical limits of perceptual systems; goals of sensory coding; structure and evolution of sensory systems; theories of perception. Perceptual experiments will be conducted by students in laboratory classes. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: PSYC1001 or PSYC1002 PSYC0052. Advanced social psychology (6 credits) This advanced laboratory course is designed for students interested in learning how to conduct studies in social psychology. Students will develop skills in critically evaluating current theoretical controversies and methodological paradigms. Special attention is given to theoretical, methodological, and measurement issues such as critical thinking in social psychology, social research design, proposal writing, and research ethics. This course is seminar format with the expectation that students will participate actively and on occasion help to lead discussion. Some combination of readings, written assignments, and oral presentation is required. Students will each do an independent empirical research project. Priority will be given to UG students major in psychology. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisites: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003; and PSYC1004; and either PSYC0019 or PSYC0020. PSYC0053. Advanced research in industrial/organizational psychology (6 credits) This research-based course focuses on specific topics in industrial/organizational psychology that are pertinent to the latest economic development in Hong Kong and in the Greater China Region. Psychometric assessment of various job attitudes, aptitudes, and work-related personality will be one such topic. Students will develop their knowledge and hands-on skills in selected areas covered in the 323 introductory course on Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Students will each do an independent empirical research project. Priority will be given to UG students major in psychology. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: PSYC1004 and PSYC0063. PSYC0054. Human neuropsychology (6 credits) This course introduces to you the basic principles of Neuropsychology. The objectives of the course are: (1) to introduce basic concepts of neurophysiology and functional neuroanatomy, (2) to review models describing different cognitive functions discussed in this course, and (3) to introduce the concept of brain-behavior connection via reviewing the neuro-anatomical and neuropsychological mechanisms underlying some common brain disorders. Students will each do an independent empirical research project. Priority will be given to UG students major in psychology. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisites: PSYC1004 and PSYC0022. PSYC0055. Research internship in psychology I (3 credits) Students will have an opportunity to learn to do research as an intern in ongoing empirical research projects under a teacher's supervision in the Department of Psychology. The internship includes participating in lab meetings or meeting individually with the supervisor, reading relevant theoretical and empirical articles, assisting in ongoing empirical research projects, and writing an internship report. Information about research projects offering internship placements and application procedure will be available in the Psychology Department webpage. Internship I and II can be done with the same supervisor or two different supervisors. Assessment: 100% coursework. PSYC0056 Research internship in psychology II (3 credits) Please refer to Research internship in psychology I for the course description. Internship I and II can be done with the same supervisor or two different supervisors. Assessment: 100% coursework. PSYC0057. Internship in applied child development (6 credits) The internship will provide first-hand experience working with young children as teachers' aides and opportunities for observing children. In addition, you are to enroll concurrently in a seminar programme focusing on your ongoing field experiences, Educational/Social/Legal Policy, and Advocacy. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: PSYC0009 and EDUC8001 and EDUC8002 PSYC0058. Cultural psychology (6 credits) The course will survey research topics concerning how psychological processes influence culture and vice versa. Classes will be conducted in a seminar format in which students will actively participate in discussions of the topic of the week. One day before each class, each student will turn in no more than three discussion questions pertaining to the assigned readings and the class will be organized around the questions and issues raised by the students. Questions will be graded for thoughtfulness and insightfulness. To encourage independent thinking, students will write a review paper, which will then form the basis for a research proposal. For students to fully benefit from the course, some prior knowledge is needed. Assessment: 100% coursework. 324 Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003; and PSYC0020 PSYC0059. Current issues in applied developmental psychology (6 credits) This course will explore application of developmental psychology to issues pertaining to improving the well-being of children and their families. Topics include: The quality of child care, patterns and ranges of normal child behaviors, child-rearing practices, developmentally challenged children, legal, and public-policy issues. Assessment: 100% coursework Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. (For candidates admitted in or after the academic year 2006-2007) PSYC0060. Research and quantitative methods in psychology (6 credits) This course is designed to extend students' quantitative and research skills so that they are prepared to conduct their own independent empirical research. It will build on what students already learned in PSYC1004 to cover more advanced quantitative methods commonly used in Psychology (e.g., multivariate analysis). This course will also cover major topics in research design (e.g. experiments and quasi-experiments) and research writing skills. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003; and PSYC1004. PSYC0061. Advanced issues in perception (6 credits) An advanced course that explores findings from both recent and classical research on human perceptual systems. Specific attention will be given to - though not limited to - computational models, psychophysical findings, neurobiological findings. Students will each do an independent empirical research project. Priority will be given to UG students major in psychology. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisites: PSYC1004 and PSYC0051; or with permission of the instructor. (BCogSc students exempt from PSYC1004). PSYC0062. Introduction to Psychopathology (6 credits) (formerly PSYC0034) This course will provide a broad exposure to both theory and practice in clinical psychology. It is a foundation course in mental health, counselling and other psychological services. Also it will provide the information and understanding required to make informed decisions about how to cope with the many social problems connected with mental disorders. A wide array of types of mental disorders will be examined. Important themes will be emphasized such as the continuum in behaviour from mental health to mental illness, the diathesis-stress and nature-nurture models and epidemiology. Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 or PSYC1002 or PSYC1003. PSYC0063. Industrial/organizational psychology (6 credits) This course surveys the complex relationships that exist between people, their social environment, and their work. Topics include job analysis, personnel selection, personnel training, vocational guidance, work evaluation, work motivation, job satisfaction, leadership, group relations, conflicts, organization design, occupational stress, and errors. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. 325 PSYC0064. Advanced Developmental Psychology (6 credits) This course will introduce you to recent and classical research findings and methods in developmental psychology. It will provide hands-on experience with the research process by having you design and implement your own independent empirical research project. It will focus on key issues facing researchers, such as problems of observing and interpreting, generating testable questions, validity, research design and measurement. Students will each do an independent empirical research project. Priority will be given to UG students major in psychology. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisites: PSYC1004 and PSYC0009. PSYC0065. Health Psychology (6 credits) This course acquaints students with the realm of health psychology. Students will gain (a) an understanding of the ways psychosocial factors influence health concerns and healthcare utilization, and (b) familiarity with basic concepts that guide the work of health professionals. Topics covered in this course include health behaviors, coping with health-related stress, social support and health, psychoimmunology, management of chronic illnesses, and patient-practitioner interaction. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003. PSYC3001. Thesis in psychology (6 credits) (For psychology major) An independent empirical investigation of a psychological problem. Thesis research will be supervised individually by teaching members of the Department. Eligible students will be invited by the Department to apply for admissions into this course. Approval by Departmental Head is required for admissions into this course. (For candidates admitted in or before the academic year 2004-2005) Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003; and PSYC0001. (For candidates admitted in the academic year 2005-2006) Prerequisite: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003; and PSYC0001; and Co-requisite: PSYC0008 or PSYC0052 or PSYC0053 or PSYC0054 or PSYC0061 or PSYC0064. (For candidates admitted in or after the academic year 2006-2007) Prerequisite: either (PSYC1001 and PSYC1004) or (PSYC1002 and PSYC1003 and PSYC1004); and PSYC0060; and Co-requisite: PSYC0008 or PSYC0052 or PSYC0053 or PSYC0054 or PSYC0061 or PSYC0064. PSYC3002. Advanced research methods in psychology (6 credits) (For candidates admitted in or before the academic year 2005-2006) Students will each do an independent empirical research project; weekly tutorial attendance for research supervision is required. Approval by Departmental Head is required for admissions into this course. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisites: either PSYC1001 or both PSYC1002 and PSYC1003; and PSYC0001. (For candidates admitted in or after the academic year 2006-2007) PSYC3006. Independent study in psychology (6 credits) Students will each do an independent empirical research project; weekly tutorial attendance for research 326 supervision is required. Approval by Departmental Head is required for admissions into this course. Assessment: 100% coursework. Prerequisite: either (PSYC1001 and PSYC1004) or (PSYC1002 and PSYC1003 and PSYC1004); and PSYC0060. Department of Social Work and Social Administration Unless otherwise specified, the examination for each 6-credit course consists of a two-hour written examination paper. The final grading will be determined by performance in the examination and an assessment of coursework in the ratio of 60:40. Teachers concerned will announce at the beginning of each semester the assessment ratio for courses not assessed in the 60:40 examination/coursework ratio. Semesters III to VI SOWK0002. Working with children and families (6 credits) This course adopts a developmental perspective in understanding children. Common behaviour problems in children (such as emotional manifestation, oppositional behaviour, conduct disorder, school problems) will be addressed. The principles and procedures of particular intervention theories relevant to the Hong Kong situation will be examined. SOWK0007. Working with families (6 credits) This course will examine the concept of a `family perspective and assist students in gaining an understanding of the major approaches to working with families. Theories on family, methods of assessment, and a range of strategies and techniques for effective intervention with the family as well as their applicability to the local context will be considered. SOWK0009. Issues and interventions in mental health settings (6 credits) This course aims to enhance the students' basic understanding of mental illness by focusing on alternative definitions of mental illness, cross-cultural considerations, etiology, and interventive strategies. The diversity of roles of the professionals in team work with the mentally ill within the Hong Kong context will also be examined. SOWK0011. Issues in health care and rehabilitation settings (6 credits) This course gives students a basic understanding of the relationship between health, handicap and rehabilitation, public acceptance and social stigma, so as to enable the students to work more effectively in health care and rehabilitation settings. SOWK0012. Social welfare in China (6 credits) The course explores the philosophies, organization, techniques and development of social welfare provision in China. The work of the service organizations such as Civil Affairs Bureau, Street Offices, Unions, Federation of Women, and Communist Youth League would be studied. Issues of social security, youth policy, women status , child care, the care of the elderly people, the physically and mentally handicapped and professional training would be discussed. 327 SOWK0013. Social work practice with selected target groups or in specific settings (6 credits) This course will focus on the practice of social work with selected target groups such as children, youth and delinquents, alcoholics and drug addicts, or in specific settings such as school, hospital, youth centres and correctional facilities. For each group or setting, attention will be focused on gaining a comprehensive understanding of the nature of the problems encountered and the role of social work in solving such problems. SOWK0014. Health administration (6 credits) The theme of this course will be the importance of taking into account the cultural, economic, social and physical environments when examining matters to do with the provision of health care. The aim will be to introduce students to the issues of planning and priorities, financing and resource allocation, management principles, arguments concerning quality versus quantity, community health and public education as they relate to health administration. SOWK0020. Oncology, palliative and hospice care (6 credits) Professionals in the field of medical and health settings are expected to be competent in oncology care, palliative and hospice care. The students will learn about the medical, psychological, social, spiritual and policy aspects of care for cancer patients and persons with terminal illness. Cultural, sociological and traditional approaches to death and dying as well as bereavement will be explored through student projects. SOWK0023. Social policy issues in Hong Kong (6 credits) The course will examine the issues of social policy in Hong Kong including privatization of welfare services, the impact of ideology of welfare on welfare development in Hong Kong, the issue of equity and equality in welfare provision, community care and service needs of the new arrivals from the mainland. Different theories of welfare will be discussed in relation to local welfare issues. SOWK0028. Selected topics in social work practice (6 credits) The course aims at developing knowledge and skills relevant to the understanding and helping of focused target populations, the selection of which will be based on the special nature of specific client groups, problem areas or service settings. SOWK0029. Comparative social administration (6 credits) The course is designed to introduce the comparative study of social policy in selected countries in the world, and to examine the provision of social development programmes and social services for analysis and evaluation in cross-country case studies. SOWK0030. Law and social administration (6 credits) The course covers two areas: (a) `Professional Law': human service workers and lawyers, different 328 approaches to the same problem, probation officers, social workers and the courts, children and the law, care and supervision, compulsory measures, adoption law and procedure; the mentally ill and the handicapped; and (b) General Legal Studies: an outline of the legal system and the administration of law in Hong Kong; Family Law; marriage, divorce, maintenance, rights in the matrimonial home; Housing: homelessness and the law, landlord and tenant (private sector and public sector), housing and public health law and practice; legal aid and legal advice schemes in Hong Kong. SOWK0033. Working with youth at risk and juvenile offenders (6 credits) This course will focus on the various approaches in working with delinquents and young people experiencing emotional or behavioural problems. To facilitate skills development, emphasis will be placed on experiential learning through the use of simulated exercises, games and role-play. Throughout the course, case and group examples will be drawn from a variety of local practice settings-probation, residential facilities for juvenile offenders, correctional services, outreach and school social work. SOWK0034. Youth crime and juvenile justice issues (6 credits) This course will begin with a critical review of the current state of theory and research on youth problems and delinquency. It will then go on to evaluate existing policies and services directed at youth at risk and juvenile offenders in Hong Kong. Finally it will explore current issues in the field of youth policy and juvenile justice, particularly the overseas development of new programme initiatives. Special emphasis will be given to the relevance of these issues and programmes within the Hong Kong context. SOWK0037. Human sexuality (6 credits) This course tells you everything you always want to know about sex but are too afraid to ask: Whom you want to have sex with and why? What would you do in sex and where and when would you do it? Who's on your mind when you think about sex, Leon Lai or Shu Kei? Which is more pleasurable, heterosexual sex or homosexual sex? What is the best sex that you've ever had? Why are having sex with yourself and masturbation acts of revolution? What is pornography a stimulant to or substitute for sex? Who has a better claim to authority on sex, your family doctor, your lecturer, the host of a radio phone-in program on sex or a sex worker in the street? SOWK0044. Medical knowledge for social sciences students (3 credits) Chronic illness, pain, accidents, and terminal illness are a major source of stress in contemporary society. It is important for students to be knowledgeable about the human body and its common illnesses. The objectives of this course include: to familiarize students with the disease patterns in Hong Kong, to study common diseases which present major health hazards, and to acquire a basic understanding of the medical language. No prior knowledge in medicine is required. A basic understanding of human biology will be an advantage. Assessment: 100% coursework. SOWK0046. Socio-cultural context of aging (6 credits) The aging experience and age-related changes in physical, mental, and social functioning vary across different cultures and societies. This course examines the psychological, environmental, and societal factors accompanying and shaping the process of aging with a special emphasis on examining the 329 Chinese and Western cultures. Specifically, the course focuses on how unique aspects of a particular culture or society determine physical, mental and social well-being in old people. Normal and pathological changes in physical, mental, and social functioning associated with aging will be examined, and the implications of such factors as ageism, economic deprivation, exits from social roles, and being widow, and for the well-being of older adults will be addressed. The roles of family caregivers and human service providers, in the enhancement of the well-being of the elderly will also be explored. SOWK0050. Government and politics of social services in Hong Kong (6 credits) This course explores the evolution of social policy in Hong Kong. Alternative approaches to understanding the political, economic, and social dynamics that influence social policy and the implications of these dynamics for social reform will be considered. The formation of political responses to human problems and the impact of such responses on social policy will be discussed with reference to the constitution, the legislature, the Chief Executive and the Executive Council, political parties, pressure groups and the electoral system. SOWK0051. Information and communication technology in human services (6 credits) This course is designed to introduce students to the utilization of information and communication technology in human service settings. The major areas are (a) a review of the trends in the human service agencies' use of information and communication technology; (b) an exploration of software frequently used in the human services; and (c) the ethics of IT usage in the human services. SOWK0053. Evaluation of social services (6 credits) This course will introduce students to a variety of approaches used to evaluate social services. Students will learn how evaluation techniques can help social service personnel respond to the growing demand for accountability, given that appropriate measures have been taken to collect and analyze data in order to inform decision making. These techniques include: evaluability assessment, designing goals and objectives, choosing an evaluation approach and developing process and outcome measures. Through the course materials, students come to understand the necessity of grounding evaluation approaches within an organization context and the practical issues that arise while implementing an evaluation and using evaluation results. Assessment: 100% coursework SOWK0054. Gender and society a policy perspective (6 credits) Men and women's experience of the social world is significantly different but gender as a social construct is frequently overlooked both in academic discourse and in policy planning arenas. Gender effects are clear in health, education, employment, housing, social security provision, political activity and family (both in terms of private relations and family policy). This course will examine the different theories of gender discrimination, the consequent effects on social, economic and political life and attempt to answer the question `what is to be done about it?' SOWK0055. Management in human service organizations (6 credits) The aim of this course is to enable students to understand the recent business-oriented reforms in human service organizations. Human service organizations provide welfare, education and medical services to their users. The dynamics of quality improvements, strategic planning, monitoring and control, 330 management information system, performance appraisal, supervision, stress management, teamwork, financial management and change are included. SOWK0057. Aging and society (6 credits) This course is to study the ways in which social and cultural factors enter into the aging process. The practical and immediate effects of aging on society are examined. The course provides a comprehensive description of the dimensions of aging. The goal is to provide a holistic view of aging and to point to the ways in which the personal, social and structural levels of the process interact to shape the daily life of the elderly. With these understandings, the ways to deliver appropriate services to the elderly are discussed. SOWK0058. Managing people in human services (6 credits) This course introduces concepts for the understanding of organization behaviour and emphasizes on the application of these concepts and the skills in managing people in non-profit making organizations. This course is particularly suitable for students who have not taken any management courses before but will be soon required to take up people management responsibility as a team leader or supervisor in the course of their own professional career development. The topics will include basic concepts on management functions, purposes of a managerial position and the roles of a manger; and skills in managing subordinates including motivation, morale, leadership, coaching, performance management and disciplinary actions. SOWK0060. Career skills training (6 credits) Success in one's career is one of the most important life tasks for most people. Besides teaching students the necessary knowledge and practice of core career skills, this course also trains students to design and conduct career skills programmes. Through participation in this course, students will be able to master the theories and skills of career planning, understand the relationship between labour market dynamics and job searching, analyse the effect of social, economic and political changes on the job market. Through understanding the social psychology of career aspects, students will become more sensitive to human dynamics in the work setting. Assessment: 100% coursework. SOWK0061. Financial development and management for social service organizations (6 credits) This course introduces and examines concepts and practices critical to good financial management of social service organizations. The focus is on preparing students to understand the financial activities and reports essential to management and to analyze and use financial information in planning, budgeting and measuring results to promote the organization's mission and goals. Fund-raising will also be discussed. SOWK0062. Special topics in policy study (6 credits) Any special topics in policy study that reflect current topical and changing needs in the community. SOWK0063. Special topics in administrative study (6 credits) 331 Any special topics in administrative study that reflect current topical and changing needs in the community. SOWK0064. Special topics in research study (6 credits) Any special topics in research study that reflect current topical and changing needs in the community. SOWK0065. Understanding and working with young people (6 credits) This course examines the developmental characteristics and needs of young people and their actualization in the local context. Special focus is put on understanding the contemporary local youth culture and how it reveals the needs of the young people. Major models and concepts in youth work are introduced. Working skills with young people implied from these models and concepts are also introduced. This course is especially suitable for students who intend to join the fields that work with young people, e.g. social work, teaching, church, entertainment, etc. SOWK0066. Care management (6 credits) Care management is a major practice strategy to promote effective service delivery to diverse target populations. It is based on the notion that human service practitioners often work with people who have multiple needs. The major outcomes of care management are better integration of services provided by a cluster of organizations and community of care. This course covers the role of care management in the human services; the method and functions of care management in both direct and indirect services; and the monitoring and evaluation functions of care management practice. SOWK0068. Social skills training for human service personnel (6 credits) This course will consider the theoretical foundation of social skills training. The relevance of social skills training to different areas of human service practice including teamwork and staff training will be discussed. Skills in working with individuals and groups in human service settings will be practiced. The course will be run in form of lectures, demonstrations, class discussion and exercises. Assessment: 100% coursework. SOWK0069. Counselling in health care settings (6 credits) Counselling approaches used in health care such as crisis intervention, grief work, cognitive behavioral intervention, support groups, art therapy, psycho-education skills, bereavement counselling, pastoral care and peer counselling will be examined. Students will be provided with experiential training on skills/ techniques in working with patients in hospitals and in the community. SOWK0071. Religions and superstitions in everyday life (6 credits) Using a social psychological framework, the course examines practices commonly observed in Hong Kong and elsewhere, such as church going, the worshipping of gods at home, in the street and in temples, visits to shamans and ceremonies concerned with the dead. These practices are then placed in the wider framework of beliefs and knowledge about the world and about ourselves. The growth and development of belief and knowledge in the individual and in society is explored, in an attempt to understand why people do what they do. All of it leads inevitably to a discussion of science and religion 332 in its historical and current perspectives SOWK0074. Teachers as counsellors (6 credits) As many students might join the teaching profession when they graduate, a purpose of this course is to help course participants understand the developmental characteristics, needs and struggles of students (children and adolescents). To understand the counselling process and acquire necessary skills in offering counselling to students are also main focuses of this course. It is expected that through the course, participants can be more equipped to be effective helpers in working with students to cope with their school life. SOWK0075. Violence in intimate relationships (6 credits) The issue of violence in intimate relationships (e.g. domestic violence & violence in dating) is examined through multi-lenses. The course introduces the nature of the different kinds of violence in intimate relationships. The knowledge and skills necessary to understand the dynamics of different kinds of violence are taught. How to assess the violent issues, how to identify appropriate intervention strategies and how to apply the related skills in the working situation are introduced. Particular emphasis is given to the relationship between violence and gender issues. Assessment: 30% readings and participation, 70% term paper. SOWK0076. New age health care in community (6 credits) An innovative course aims at promoting holistic health care concepts and intervention models in local context. Topics include: cultural concepts on health and illness, Chinese help-seeking behaviors; concepts on psychosocial needs and intervention, total patient care, team work in health care setting; gender perspectives and health care: working with powerless women and couples; working with sick children and families; community rehabilitation, self-help movement and patient's rights; geriatric health care, care-giver supports; grief and bereavement, death and hospice care; working with individuals / casework approach; expressive art and group approach; use of emotional healing skills, alternative medicine approaches; research agenda and methods in health care setting. SOWK0077. International perspective in human services (6 credits) This course is a joint venture with universities from other parts of the world. The objective of the course is to promote cultural exchanges and appreciation of diversity. The course is designed to provide a forum for discussion and interaction among students from different races and cultural backgrounds. Students will be visiting other participating universities or vice versa. It is expected that through the joint projects which will be developed during the course, students will gain better awareness of how each culture is constrained or aided by their values, beliefs, norms, and attitudes. SOWK0084. Theoretical foundations in social policy and planning (6 credits) This course is designed to examine various models for the analysis of social policy, as well as basic concepts of social planning, programme design and implementation. Selected social policy issues in Hong Kong will be critically analyzed to further the understanding of the factors contributing to the development of social service provision systems to deal with these issues. 333 SOWK0085. Social service research I: methodology (6 credits) This course is designed to provide a basic grounding in research methodology and to illustrate the major concepts, methods and goals of social service research. SOWK0086. Social service research II: analysis and utilization (6 credits) The objective of this course is to enable students to apply and interpret various methods in data analysis, as well as to enable them to critically analyze research reports and make intelligent use of research findings in social policy planning and administration. Prerequisite: SOWK0085. SOWK0087. Social service research project (6 credits) In this course, students are going to conduct a selected group research project of their interest. Under the guidance of the teacher, students can learn and experience the whole research process including: defining research objectives, identifying research questions, designing research methodology and instrumentation, collecting data, analysing data, writing up research report and disseminating the research results. Assessment: 100% coursework. SOWK0088. Body politics (6 credits) Are you forever on diet or frantically toning up your muscles? Are you attracted to tattoo, piercing, breast transplant or other forms of body manipulation? Do you dye your hair, keep it long or shave it clean? Do you desire a body like yours or of the other sex? How private is your body? Did your parents ever beat you up to quiet you down? Do you detest torture while admiring extreme sporters? If you believe in body language, do you know when your body is silenced? Does a handicapped, deformed or ageing body disturb you? And a corpse? Who has control over your body: your family, your lover, your doctor, or the Government? This course provides students with insights in the meaning of body as an object of inquiry. If a body is a playground providing us with sensational pleasures, it is also a battlefield where forces of domination are constantly at war. The complex ways in which our bodies are manipulated, abused and used as source of power will be explored. Guided by a diversity of classical and contemporary perspectives, this course helps you search your soul by getting inside your body. SOWK0089. Family and society a policy perspective (6 credits) This course will study the changing functions of the family system as the most fundamental caring unit in society. Policies affecting the family system, its relation with other social institutions, and measures necessary to strengthen its roles will be discussed. SOWK0091. Current welfare issues in Hong Kong (6 credits) The format of this course is problem-based. Students and Course Instructor together identify the current welfare issues (CWIs) at the beginning of the term. For each CWI, the Course Instructor assists the students to identify the learning objectives, locate the relevant learning material, develop understanding in the areas identified, and construct the learning experience. Areas of learning may extend beyond the subject of social welfare to cover economics, politics, public finance, public administration, social psychology, sociology, management. In the first term, the Policy Address of the Chief Executive of the SAR Government may be chosen as one of the CWIs. In the second term, the Budget of the SAR 334 Government for 2000-2001 may be chosen. Assessment: 100% coursework. SOWK0092. Adventure-Based Counselling: theory and practice (6 credits) Adventure-Based Counselling (ABC) is a popular contemporary approach employed to work with people in order to assist their building and/or promoting of a positive self-concept, improve their interpersonal relationship and enhance their problem-solving abilities. Although it is especially popular among working with young people, it can also be used in working with different age groups, families and couples. This course aims to introduce the basic theories and practices of ABC and to provide training in some micro skills in conducting ABC sessions. The quality of an ABC facilitator and the ethical considerations in employing ABC to work with people will be discussed in the course. The format of the course includes lectures, seminars and ABC workshops for students to participate and experience the process. SOWK0093. Generation Y: youth (sub) cultures (6 credits) This course explores various youth (sub)cultures, and will be organized around the following topics: (1) body and beauty; (2) club cultures and drugs; (3) sex and the cyber-space; (4) popular and indie music. This course focuses on the insiders' perspective, i.e. the ways in which young people actually experience and make sense of their own activities, while sensitizing students to the historical specificity of the construction of youth as a social category and the politics of representation. SOWK0094. Human service development, promotion, and evaluation (6 credits) As the society increasingly emphasizes accountability of human services, the organizations providing such services have to develop, improve and deliver these services in a more cost-effective and cost-efficient way to satisfy the changing needs of the citizens. This course examines the roles of social marketing and market research in the human services through application of the principles and practices learned. This course provides students with some essentials, values, knowledge and skills in human service development, promotion, distribution and evaluation. The students will have the opportunity to develop and apply decision-making and analytical skills relevant to the functions of social marketing and market research within the human service. SOWK0096. Policy provisions for income protection (6 credits) This course will discuss the concept of social security, its historical development, and functions in society. Students will be introduced to the planning, financing and administration of the social security systems as they are operated in Hong Kong and elsewhere. SOWK0097. Information technology and society (6 credits) This course examines the various issues related to the impact of the development of information and communication technology on modern society. Such issues range from family and interpersonal relationship, organizational changes, social organization, digital divide and politics. Relevant theories, researches, social interventions and social policy will be covered in this semester course. 335 SOWK0098. Working with people with disabilities (6 credits) Social workers who work with people with disabilities nowadays should have critical mind and self-reflective attitudes to meet the challenges from the changing field of disabilities. To enhance quality of life of people with disabilities, social workers should have sensitivity to understand situations of individuals with disabilities, and have substantial knowledge of intervening in different levels of environments. Providing students an insightful learning process, this course uses interactive and experiential activities besides traditional one-way lectures. Guests, including friends with intellectual disabilities, friends with physical handicap, their carers and social workers, will be invited to come to the class to share their life experience. This course introduces students the paradigm shift in the field, the evolution of services affecting people with disabilities, and contemporary approaches to provide services to people with disabilities. SOWK0099. Separation, divorce and remarriage (6 credits) This course aims at enhancing student's understanding of (1) the psychological and social implications of separation, divorce and remarriage; (2) the separation/ divorce/ remarriage decision making process and the considerations involved; (3) legal issues related to separation, divorce and remarriage (grounds for divorce, custody and maintenance, adoption, etc.); (4) the characteristics, dynamics and needs of single parent families and stepfamilies; and (5) intervention approaches relevant to working with divorced and remarried families. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. SOWK0100. Medical aspect of psychiatric illness (6 credits) This course is an introductory course to the medical aspect of psychiatric illness. The objectives of the course are: (1) to know the basic concept of what psychiatric illness is; (2) to have the basic concept on various psychiatric illnesses; and (3) to know the current available psychiatric treatments and services. Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination. SOWK0101. Bullying, aggression and resilience (6 credits) The issue of bullying and aggression in adolescents and adulthood is examined through multiple perspectives. An introduction to the prevalence of bullying, current theories and research on the etiology of bullying and aggression in school and workplace will be discussed. A model of resilience is adopted to rebuild the vocabulary of strengths and the culture of support. Students will be trained to equip risk assessment and management, crisis intervention, counseling skills, group therapy and institutional management in