CH3 Theories_of_Integration - Theories have been classified...

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This paper is a duplicate and a complement of Wednesday September 3 class. Here are presented the two main visions of Europe: by American scholars and by European scholars and elites. Each one offers an original point of view. Try to build your own synthesis. Quizzes begin after September 9. They will consist in a few questions picked up from the lists on the blackboard. -*-*-*-*- European integration seems to follow an erratic path. A journey into institutional theory. ECN331A - September 3, 2003 The European Union started as the ECSC (European Coal and Steel Community), with production of these vital war materials 'pooled' across the frontiers, an arrangement that was also much more efficient. But this 'federalist' model of a Europe to-be has developed to see central institutions like the European Commission (Brussels, B.) , Parliament (Strasburg, F.) and Court of Theories have been classified by categories: . Realism . Functionalism . Neofunctionalism . Intergovernmentalism And Supranationalism, Internationalism, …
Justice (The Hague, H.) dealing with Europe-wide projects like the single market (SEA) and currency (Euro), work, safety, product and environmental regulations and border controls, all of which are seen as better handled at an international level. The European Union has changed periodically throughout its history. Its membership, originally six, has been expanded several times and now stands at 15. The scope of its action has broadened dramatically. Its decision-making procedures have been altered. Many envision continued evolution … The emergence of the ECSC, the EEC, the SEA and finally the EU has provoked scholars to reexamine the European Union as a political system. The various theoretical approaches or explanations of European integration can actually be divided into two classes: functionalism (now changing into “Neofunctionalism”) and intergovernmentalism (and variant versions). A relatively new area of research exists for political scientists to study the correlation between variables defined as functionalist and variables defined as intergovernmental. 1. Realism. See McCormick, chapter 1 and Pinder, chapter 1. 2. Functionalism. Some sociologists (the “functionalists”) see society as being like a living person. Just as all the different organs in a human body (heart, brain, lungs, etc.) work together in harmony, so all the different parts of society (work, government, education, religion etc.) are seen to work together in harmony. As in a human body, each part of society depends on the other parts of society, on the basis of: - Social needs and - Social purposes that fulfill those needs. For example, work needs people who are socialized into the values and norms of society and the family (an organization) exists for the purpose of fulfilling that need. Just like in a human body, if one part of society stops working in the way that it should, problems are created in that society.

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