Module 1 - Module 1 This is a single concatenated file suitable for printing or saving as a PDF for offline viewing Please note that some animations or

Module 1 - Module 1 This is a single concatenated file...

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Module 1 This is a single, concatenated file, suitable for printing or saving as a PDF for offline viewing. Please note that some animations or images may not work. Module 1 Study Guide and Deliverables Readings: Online lectures Whitten & Bentley, Primary: pp. 6–16, and 30–33. Secondary: pp. 4–65 Discussions: Discussion 1 postings end May 20 at 6:00 AM ET Assignments: Assignment 1 due May 20 at 6:00 AM ET Assessments: Quiz 1 due May 18 at 6:00 AM ET Module 1 Objectives The specific goals of this week's lectures are to define systems analysis : its goals, its processes, and its participants. Systems analysis is sometimes referred to as system analysis (i.e., with no “s”). By reading the lectures and completing the assignments this week, you will be able to: Differentiate between systems engineering, software engineering, and systems analysis Distinguish among types of business systems Recognize the participants in a systems analysis project Identify the contents of systems requirements Describe the concept of process Identify the phases of systems development Distinguish between requirements and design Understand the importance of the quality assurance process Differentiate among development process alternatives Grasp the meaning of configuration management Introduction
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This text will be replaced with: met_cs682_10_fa2_ebraude_w1l1 Download () This module’s lectures will introduce systems analysis as a whole. The learning goal for the first lecture is to cover the following topics: Systems Analysis Relationships System Requirements Types of Business Systems Participants in Systems Analysis Relationships Between “Systems Analysis,” “System Engineering” and “Software Engineering” The animation on the right illustrates the following points about the relationships between systems analysis, system engineering, and software engineering. In all three fields, we identify requirements: the desired capabilities of the application(s). In all cases, people make the project happen, and they use one or more processes to achieve this goal.
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Systems engineering is distinguished by the integration of hardware and software. Systems analysis is distinguished by its primary focus on business goals of the future system. In some cases, no programming is needed if off-the-shelf software can be used to satisfy business goals. Software engineering projects, on the other hand, always involve programming. Real-time code must execute within hard and fast time constraints. For example, the code that controls the flaps of a jet's wings must respond within a very short time to airplane controls. This is an important aspect of system engineering and software engineering. Databases are a very common feature of business systems, although they are not restricted to business. Multiple computers are common in systems analysis and system engineering (for example, client-server systems). Software engineering typically focuses on developing complex software systems that run on one computer at a time (for example, Microsoft Word).
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