Week 4 Discussion (LANs) - TopicPrintView Week4:Wired,WirelessLANs,andBackboneNetworks Discussion LANs(graded SallysShoes(minicase: .

Week 4 Discussion (LANs) - TopicPrintView...

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Unformatted text preview: 9/25/2016 Topic Print View Week 4: Wired, Wireless LANs, and Backbone Networks ­ Discussion LANs (graded) Sally’s Shoes (mini case): Sally Smith runs a shoe store in the mall that is about 30 feet by 50 feet in size, including a small office and a storage area in the rear. The store has one inventory computer in the storage area and one computer in the office. She is replacing the tow cash registers with computers that will act as cash registers but will also be able to communicate with the inventory computer. Sally wants to network the computers with a LAN. What sort of LAN design would you recommend? What would be your suggestions to improve the performance of this LAN? Responses Response Author LAN's Professor Gander Date/Time 9/17/2016 6:24:03 PM Class, what sort of LAN design would you recommend for Sally's Shoes? RE: LAN's Karly Derosena 9/18/2016 5:14:25 AM Modified:9/18/2016 5:58 AM Sally should use 10Base­T or 100Base­T network solutions. 10Base­T is an Ethernet solution which helps in transmitting data at 10Mbps over the telephone wires or twisted pair wire. 100Base­T is an Ethernet solution which helps in transmitting data at 100mbps. Peer to peer or dedicated networks can be used. In peer to peer network, all the computers on the network work as a client as a server. No dedicated server is required in peer to peer network. While in the dedicated network, one or more computers work permanently as the dedicated servers. Sally should use dedicated network as she has to safe her inventory system and dedicated network provides long run Also large databases and large file can be handled easily. By using the following dedicated network, sally can connect her LAN to another network. Sally.png RE: LAN's Jermaine Huggins 9/18/2016 10:03:24 PM A network circuit is where computers must be physically connected by network circuits to the other computers in the network. Yet, Wired LAN’s provide many options for UTP, cable, shielded, twisted­pair (STP) cable or fiber­optic cable in a host of ways that can be connected for transmission of data sent to the device. However, in telecommunications, a circuit is a discrete (specific) path between two or more points along which signals can be carried. (NEXT(9aa8e367917140bc999f3323f7766024))/Main/CourseMode/Topic/TopicPrintView.ed?topicID=7000009334576&so… 1/28 9/25/2016 Topic Print View Unless otherwise qualified, a circuit is a physical path, consisting of one or more wires (or wireless paths) and possibly intermediate switching points. A network is an arrangement of circuits. In a dial­ up (switched) connection, a circuit is reserved for use by one user for the duration of the calling session. In a dedicated or leased line arrangement, a circuit is reserved in advance and can only be used by the owner or renter of the circuit. Network circuits in my home network, a major carrier has connected (ONT) 100 BaseT­ (Fiber­optic) and now will offer at some point (CAT 7/62.5/50). Currently, Fios running into my home is wireless and is bundled Internet access, telephone and video (television) and a wireless printer for printing capability to print from any location within the home. Reference: Fitzgerald, Dennis, Durcikova, Business Data Communications and Networking, 12th Ed., (2014), Wiley. (Chp. 7, page 186). hp://wha뛕s.techtarget.com/defini뛕on/circuit RE: LAN's Jermaine Huggins 9/18/2016 10:03:52 PM I'll suggest having a wired LAN. Also because of the distance I'll suggest using STP cables as running fiber­optic might just cost extra. In my home, I have STP cable that runs from my modem to my wireless router with switching capabilities that connects all of my devices, computers, laptops, and printer. Her needs are similar so she can do the same, except the need for wireless. RE: LAN's Omolabake Dawodu 9/21/2016 9:36:11 AM I suggest Sally to use a simple. 10Base­T Ethernet or at most a 100Base­T network solution. The network can use wither peer to peer or a dedicated server. However, a dedicated server would be preferable for the long run and cost will be an overriding concern because this is probably a small business. As a matter of fact, many organizations today install switched 100Base­T for their wired LAN's relatively because of low cost and fast. (NEXT(9aa8e367917140bc999f3323f7766024))/Main/CourseMode/Topic/TopicPrintView.ed?topicID=7000009334576&so… 2/28 9/25/2016 Topic Print View RE: LAN's Joseph Office 9/19/2016 6:29:04 AM Due to the small size of the mall store, I would recommend a wireless LAN for Sally's shoes. The wireless access point or router should be omnidirectional since the store needs network connectivity with the computer in the storage and the one in the office. The router should be connected to a WAN possibly provided by a service provider such as ATT, Comcast, etc. In addition, each of the computers and cash registers should be equipped with equivalent TCP/IP ports and NICs in order to be able to tap into the wireless network provided. In order to improve the performance of the LAN, the wired portion of the router should have a high bandwidth capable of maximizing the data utility of the network. FitzGerald, J., Dennis, A., Durcikova, A. (2015). Business Data Communications and Networking, 12th Edition. [VitalSource Bookshelf Online]. Retrieved from RE: LAN's Leslie Thames 9/20/2016 7:03:40 PM Rather, we mean actual networking, the kind that lets your office’s technology devices communicate with each other and with the world. Read on for a rundown on what you need to consider when setting up a small business network from scratch. CAT 3 is still ubiquitous due to its use with phones, but it’s not suitable for modern Ethernet devices. Use of 100 Mbps Ethernet devices requires CAT 5 cable, while 1000 Mbps (a.k.a. Gigabit) devices require at least CAT 5e. Speaking of Gigabit, since virtually all modern desktops, notebooks, and servers support it and the cost of Gigabit Ethernet switches (the devices that provide additional ports to expand your network) is not much higher than for 100 Mbps Ethernet switches, in most cases it will make sense to go with Gigabit. ­a­ small­business­office­from­scratch.html RE: LAN's Shauna Allen 9/19/2016 1:52:47 PM Modified:9/19/2016 1:53 PM I would recommend a wired LAN with unshielded twisted­pair (UTP) cable. Maybe category 5e UTP cable that is rated for 1000 Mbps in a LAN that runs at 100 Mbps. She is in a small enough space, it sounds like, that this would work. A single space, not taking up multiple floors. She could opt for fiber­optic cables instead of UTP which saves on space due to the thinner wires, however it costs more. It depends on which option she would prefer and how the office is set up ­ if it is set up to handle the thicker wire, then UTP would be a good cost­effective measure., RE: LAN's Melody Barnhill 9/20/2016 9:53:11 PM Modified:9/21/2016 11:43 AM I agree that unshielded twisted­pair cable would be the best to use. Unshielded twisted pair is the most common kind of copper telephone wiring. Twisted pair is the ordinary copper wire that connects home and many business computers to the telephone company. To reduce crosstalk or electromagnetic induction between pairs of wires, two insulated copper wires are twisted around each other. Each signal on twisted pair requires both wires. Since some telephone sets or desktop locations (NEXT(9aa8e367917140bc999f3323f7766024))/Main/CourseMode/Topic/TopicPrintView.ed?topicID=7000009334576&so… 3/28 9/25/2016 Topic Print View require multiple connections, twisted pair is sometimes installed in two or more pairs, all within a single cable. RE: LAN's Jermaine Huggins 9/24/2016 10:51:15 PM Twisted pair is now frequently installed with two pairs to the home, with the extra pair making it possible for you to add another line (perhaps for modem use) when you need it The wire you buy at a local hardware store for extensions from your phone or computer modem to a wall jack is not twisted pair. It is a side­by­side wire known as silver satin. The wall jack can have as many five kinds of hole arrangements or pinouts, depending on the kinds of wire the installation expects will be plugged in (for example, digital, analog, or LAN). That's why you may sometimes find when you carry your notebook computer to another location that the wall jack connections won't match your plug. RE: LAN's Omar Fares 9/20/2016 5:44:04 PM Modified:9/20/2016 5:44 PM I recommend using wired Ethernet since it is not long distance and has very few computers. For the topology, I suggest using switch­based Ethernet because it is more efficient than the hub­based Ethernet. I think 100Base­T is enough. RE: LAN's Eric Frazier 9/20/2016 6:13:56 PM There is no real reason to reinvent the wheel here. I recommend that Sally use both wired and wireless connections for her network. The office and POS systems can run on Wifi. The inventory computer can be wired. I only say this because the reliability of the connection for the inventory machine is slightly higher than the others. This can be done with the router/modem that comes from the ISP. 4 machines don't require at $10,000 dollar network. It's also better to keep it small. There are less parts that can break down. This is one time that a Network administrator doesn't need to be a part of making a network. All they would do is make things complicated and costly. RE: LAN's Elh Ibrahima Barry 9/20/2016 6:48:00 PM Due to the size of Sally’s Shoes store, I would personally recommend a Wired LAN design using some form of Ethernet. More specifically, I would recommend using a Switch­Based Ethernet to design the LAN with (see FIGURE 7­5 Ethernet topology using switches from the book). There are many different types of Ethernet in use today. I would definitely recommend the Fast Ethernet (i.e., 100Base­T) or Gigabit Ethernet (i.e., 1000Base­T), which are the most common forms of Ethernet used today. Fast Ethernet is a name to describe a variety of technologies used to implement the Ethernet standard (Implementation at the PHYSICAL layer and the MAC sublayer) at speeds up to 100 Mbps. Fast Ethernet improves the previous standard that allows data transfer at speeds not exceeding 10 Mbps. These variants of the Ethernet standard are defined by the IEEE 802.3u and IEEE 802.3y standards. Gigabit Ethernet is a term used to describe a variety of technologies used to implement the Ethernet standard for data transfer rates of one gigabit per second (or 1000 Mbps). These technologies are based on twisted pair or fiber optic cables. They are defined by the IEEE 802.3z and 802.3ab standards. (NEXT(9aa8e367917140bc999f3323f7766024))/Main/CourseMode/Topic/TopicPrintView.ed?topicID=7000009334576&so… 4/28 9/25/2016 Topic Print View FitzGerald, Jerry, Alan Dennis, Alexandra Durcikova. Business Data Communications and Networking, 12th Edition. Wiley, 2015. VitalSource Bookshelf Online. RE: LAN's Jeremy Rak 9/20/2016 7:34:52 PM Professor and Classmates, The type of LAN design I would recommend for the smaller business setting is a wireless LAN design. The components would consist of the following: a wireless access point, new wireless cash registers, existing wireless inventory computer and wireless office computer. The wireless AP would connect to the store router. From the router, each device would connect wireless to the AP to create the wireless network. ~Jeremy FitzGerald, J., Dennis, A., Durcikova, A. (2015). Business Data Communications and Networking, 12th Edition. [VitalSource Bookshelf Online]. Retrieved from RE: LAN's Cheikh Kebe 9/21/2016 4:50:33 PM I will recommend Ethernet for, it is the most commonly used LAN in the world, accounting for almost 70 percent of all LANs. Ethernet uses a bus topology and a contention­based technique media access technique called Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD). Thank you! Cheikh RE: LAN's Aaron DeBarr 9/21/2016 5:42:14 PM Most organizations today install switched 100Base­T over category 5e wiring for their LANs. It is relatively low cost and fast. Therefore, many vendors have started calling traditional Ethernet a "legacy technology," which means they will continue to support it but will build no new products. Backbone networks often run faster (as we discuss in later topics), so many organizations are installing 100Base­T switches that have one 1000Base­F port to connect into the backbone. The cost of switched 100Base­T has dropped dramatically, so it is even cheap enough for home use. A small SOHO switch (SOHO stands for Small Office, Home Office) costs about $30. However, most SOHO users are installing wireless networking because the cost of installing computer cables is far more expensive than buying a wireless card for a desktop computer, so even switched Ethernet may be seen as a legacy technology for the SOHO market. ref ­when­how.com/data­communications­and­networking/the­best­practice­lan­design­data­ communications­and­networking/ RE: LAN's Labib Makar 9/21/2016 8:05:07 PM (NEXT(9aa8e367917140bc999f3323f7766024))/Main/CourseMode/Topic/TopicPrintView.ed?topicID=7000009334576&so… 5/28 9/25/2016 Topic Print View VLANs are very important item that network engineer use to create a L2 separation in network "VLAN switches are a special combination of layer­2 switches and routers. They are complex devices intended for use in large networks that have special requirements" (FitzGerald, J., Dennis, A., Durcikova, A. (2015). Business Data Communications and Networking, 12th Edition, P. 222). However, as usual, network design is based on business needs and client's requirements, so if Sally's needs a separation between the PCs that are existing in the storage room from the PC/s that should be in the office, I'd have two designs. the first one to keep the two PCs in the storage room in a VLAN and the PC in the office in a separate VLAN, but by this design the the PCs in separate VLANs will not be able to communicate with each other unless there is a L3 interface for each of those VLANs. the second design I'd leverage an advanced L2 configuration, which is to use private VLANs. so, I can assign the two rooms to the same main VLAN and create for each room a private community VLAN that will share the same main VLAN. this way we would need only one L3 interface for the main VLAN and both private VLANs will be separate. Reference: FitzGerald, J., Dennis, A., Durcikova, A. (2015). Business Data Communications and Networking, 12th Edition RE: LAN's Eric Flores 9/21/2016 8:54:38 PM Attached, you will find my LAN recommendation for Sally's Shoes. It would have a star topology design consisting of a Gigabit WiFi (802.11ad) router integrated with a 4­port switch (10/100Mbps ports). This will provide wired (reliable and secured) connectivity to all network devices. It will also add WiGig services for customers and future expansions. If Sally ever needs to add more network devices, I would recommend a 4­port Gigabit switch at a minimum for further segmentation. Fitzgerald, Jerry, & Dennis, Alan, & Durcikova, Alexandra (2014). Business Data Communications and Networking. Retrieved September 21, 2016 from Sally's Shoes' LAN.png RE: LAN's Tonya Blevins 9/24/2016 4:00:04 PM Sally should use peer‐to‐peer networking versus a dedicated server. In contrast to client‐server networks there is no dedicated server in peer‐to‐peer architecture. Thus each computer in such a network is part server and part client. This means that each computer on the network is free to share its own resources. A computer which is connected to a printer may even share the printer so that all other computers may access it over the network. Peer‐to‐peer networks do not require the same levels of performance and security as dedicated server networks require. One can therefore use Windows NT Workstation, Windows for Workgroups or Windows 95, as all of these operating systems contain all the functionalities required for a peer‐ to‐peer network. ‐vs‐digital/ RE: LAN's Jermaine Huggins 9/24/2016 10:55:36 PM (NEXT(9aa8e367917140bc999f3323f7766024))/Main/CourseMode/Topic/TopicPrintView.ed?topicID=7000009334576&so… 6/28 9/25/2016 Topic Print View Some switches can be configured to perform cut through switching on a per port basis until a user defined error threshold is reached, when they automatically change to store and forward mode. When the error rate falls below the threshold, the port automatically changes back to store and forward mode. LAN switches must use store and forward techniques to support multilayer switching. The switch must receive the entire frame before it performs any protocol layer operations. For this reason, advanced switches that perform Layer 3 switching are store and forward devices LANs Samuel Amadasun 9/19/2016 7:59:25 AM First, it will depend on Sally's budget for the LAN and whether or not factors such as data rate speed is important. If Sally is using wired LAN for example, she can choose from unshielded twisted pair cable (UTC), shielded twisted pair cable (STC), or fiber optic cable. A LAN that uses fiber optic cable are generally more expensive than twisted pair cable but they are just as or often times more reliable when it comes to maximum data rate speeds. A 1 GBps fiber optic LAN can cost about $.25 per foot. In comparison, an unshielded twisted pair LAN that provides similar data rate speeds will cost $.15 less per foot (FitzGerald, 186). Some reasons why people choose fiber optic over UTC despite costing more is because fiber optic is not as heavy and occupies less space. FitzGerald, J., Dennis, A., & Durcikova, A. (n.d.). Business Data Communications and Networking. Retrieved September 19, 2016. RE: LANs Christopher Grindey 9/19/2016 10:08:18 AM I agree Samuel, it does depend on the budget. In my opinion, fiber­optic should not be considered for this situation just due to the high costs that may only help with transmission speeds and that may not be an issue here. If we go with a wired LAN, then un­shielded or shielded twisted pair cabling should be used, coaxial cable is becoming obsolete. I think going with a wired LAN with shielded twisted pair cabling, in this situation would be best. RE: LANs Winifred Oloni 9/19/2016 2:19:21 PM I agree, it all depends on Sally's budget. I would recommend a combination of Wired LAN and Wireless LAN. Wired LAN with UTP 100BaseT will be good for her situation .Fiber optics will be way too expensive and may not be ideal for this situation. The wireless option is extremely important because it gives them the flexibility to connect mobile registers to take payments from anywhere on the shop floor and the ability to check inventory without having to be on the main computer. RE: LANs Molly Devuono 9/19/2016 4:35:09 PM I agree with others that the budget is something that needs to be looked at first and foremost, I would definitely not go with wireless inside the store. Any give busy day in a mall is a complete suck on any wireless network and it's almost impossible to get any signal anywhere ­ it would be murder on her network and devastating to her ability to make sales or stay in her files, etc (unless she can absolutely verify that she can get a strong wireless network within her location that no one else will be able to use). If she can afford it, go for fiber optics and move down from there as her budget can allow. (NEXT(9aa8e367917140bc999f3323f7766024))/Main/CourseMode/Topic/TopicPrintView.ed?topicID=7000009334576&so… 7/28 9/25/2016 Topic Print View RE: LANs Leopold A Morris 9/25/2016 10:13:30 AM Sally's Shoes is mall enough that cost is not a big variable. Of course the site should get what it needs but future proofing the store could work its favor in the future. using fiber optics and high grade routers, plus making individual LAN's for the register computers, office computer, and the inventory computer will help with security. LANs Karly Derosena 9/19/2016 9:28:23 PM To add...
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