Slavery in Americas - Slavery in the Americas Page I of 1...

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Slavery in the Americas Page I of 1 Outline Slavery in the Americas I. Slavery in the US. I) The invention of the cotton gin (1793) gave slavery anew life. 2) Slavery led to the South being a static, conservative, and closed society. Race control was a major feature of Southern society. 3) The South defended its way oflife by arguing that agricultural values (including slavery) were superior to industrial society with its non-slave labor. 4) Before the theory of evolution, scientists & physicians believed in a hierarchy ofraces-monogenists believed that blacks were inferior because of environmental factors; polygenists believed that races were created separately. 5) The belief in racial inferiority was necessary to justify the enslavement of blacks. 6) Free blacks in both the North & South faced severe discrimination. ll. Life as a US Slave. I) Slaves had no civil or legal rights. Physical punishment was common. 2) Miscegenation (sex between people of different races) was common. About 30% of slave children had white fathers. 3) Christianity was used as a means of race control. 4) Slaves responded to oppression by labor slow downs, stealing, sabotage, or running away. ill. The Abolitionist Movement in the US. I) William Lloyd Garrison published the Liberator and was the major spokesperson for the radical abolitionists. The escaped slave Fredrick Douglass was a leader of the moderate abolitionists who were willing to work through the political system. IV. Latin American Slavery. I) Most Latin American slaves lived in Brazil and the Caribbean. 2) Fewer women than North America lead to rampant miscegenation. 3) Cheaper to work slaves to death than to increase the slave population because of birth. V. Brazilian Slavery. I) Brazilian society organized around the Jazenda (large estate; the hacienda in Spanish). 2) Brazil had the largest slave population in the Americas. Brazil was a multi-racial society. 3) Slavery made it difficult for poor whites and mulattoes to find work. VI. The end of Brazilian Slavery. I) British pressure finally led to the end of the Brazilian slave trade in the 1850s. 2) Industrialization, urbanization, and world opinion all increased abolitionist movement. 3) The Paraguayan War (1870) led to the freeing of some slaves. 4) In 1871 the Rio Branco Law freed all newborn slave children. Ex-masters still able to exploit the freed slaves. 5) Slavery officially abolished in 1888 because of abolitionist agitation, mass flights of slaves, violence and an understanding by slave holders that they could find other sources of labor to grow coffee. ... 5/22/2003
Slavery in the Americas Page I of8 Slavery in the Americas I. Slavery in the United States. Prior to the 1793 invention of the cotton gin by Eli Whitney, most Americans, including slaveholders like Thomas Jefferson, believed that slavery would gradually die out due to the limited market for the crops produced by slave labor in North America (tobacco, rice & indigo). With the invention of the gin, cotton became the dominate southern crop and slavery was reinvigorated. Even without slavery,

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