PubPol 645S Global Inequality Research Initiative_Final2016_11316-1

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PubPol 645S Global Inequality Research Initiative- Social Determinants of Health Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University Spring 2016 Tuesdays 11:45-2:15 East Duke 108 Instructor: Salimah El-Amin, DrPH, MPH, CHES Nadine Barrett, PhD, MA,MS William Darity, PhD Office: Erwin Mill Building Bay A – A219 Email [email protected] Phone 919-681-6018 Office hours By appointment Course Description A potential impediment to meaningfully addressing entrenched and, in some cases, growing health differences between white Americans and communities of color in the U.S. may be an over reliance on interventions proposing to simply redistribute socioeconomic resources. Evidence suggests that such interventions appear better suited to improve social and economic inequality and, by extension, reduce health differences for low-income white Americans than meaningfully address health inequities between White Americans and racially/ethnically diverse populations both US and foreign born. A rapidly growing body of literature supports the perspective that racialization processes such as racial assignment, enforcement of racial hierarchies, white racial supremacy and related white racial privilege are contributing to negative health outcomes for people of color across a range of social settings regardless of socioeconomic status. While these phenomena are increasingly being explored in the U.S. the impact of racialization processes on the lives of communities of color representing diverse ethnic populations cross multi-national and trans-national settings remains largely unexamined and warrants rigorous investigation. To this end we propose a project to specifically and critically examine the
interaction of race, racism and socioeconomic resources on health and the policy implications of these processes across multi-national context and for a broad range of ethnically diverse populations being subjected to racialization processes. Introduction Over the course of the semester students will review, critically examine, synthesize and integrate historical, ideological, conceptual and theoretical arguments with empirical evidence to construct a comprehensive review of how a range of factors influence health and wellness or death and disease. Factors and influences we will consider include but are not limited to Socioeconomics, Gender, Race and Ethnicity, Immigration, Trans-nationalism, Social Discrimination, Social Integration and Cohesion, Distress, High Effort Coping, Physical Embodiment, Place and Neighborhood, National Ideology, Philosophical Influences, Structural Inequality, the Life Course Perspective, Inter-sectionality, and the most promising policy sponsored initiatives to enhance quality of life with the intention of improving health for all segments of the US population.

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