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Stress&Emotions_BlackBoardNotes - Emotions Stress...

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Emotions Emotions Stress Stress Sapolsky, (1999) Sapolsky, (1999) o “ Stress can make us sick ” Homeostasis Homeostasis o State of dynamic balance maintained by multiple interacting systems that constitute the self-regulatory process of physiological compensation for environmental fluctuation. - GREENBERG Homeostasis Homeostasis o A state of balance o Physiological measures are kept at an optimum Allostasis Allostasis o Different circumstances demand different homeostatic set points Stress Stress o “Stress may be defined as a threat , real or implied, to the psychological or physiological integrity of an individual” Neil Greenberg 2003 Stressor Stressor o Real or perceived challenges to an organism’s ability to meet its real or perceived needs – Greenberg o Stressor is a challenge to homeostasis
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Stressor Stressor o Anything that throws your body out of homeostatic/allostatic balance o Injury, illness, subjection to extreme heat or cold/ emotional o (Can refer to the anticipation of a stressor too ) Stress Response Stress Response o Our body’s attempt to restore the balance Results in: hormone secretion Activation of autonomic nervous system Stress Response Stress Response o Immobilization of glucose/fats & inhibition of further storage o Heart rate, BP, respiration increase o Halt extensive building projects o Arrest growth o Sex drive decreases o Cognition/ memory sharpen o Inhibit immune response o Stress-induced analgesia ** When under acute stress, cognition and memory sharpen -why people have vivid memories of traumatic experiences Chronic stress, cognition and memory decrease Stress Response Stress Response o First Component: o - arousal of sympathetic nervous system o by excitation of Locus Coeruleus
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o Release of norepinephrine and epinephrine o Turns on Second stress-response system in brain – HPA axis HPA axis HPA axis o Paraventricular nucleus (hypothalamus) norepinephrine & epinephrine activate - release CRH ( corticotropic- releasing hormone) o Anterior lobe Pituitary - release of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) o Adrenal gland - glucocorticoids ex. Cortisol- stress hormone Why does the stress response make us
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