F16160Syllabus - University of Massachusetts Amherst Course...

This preview shows page 1 out of 4 pages.

Unformatted text preview: University of Massachusetts Amherst Course Title: Biology of Cancer and AIDS Term: Fall Semester 2016 Course#: Microbio 160 Credit Hours: 4 Section 02 Bartlett Hall 106 MWF @ 9:05 – 9:55 AM TA: Patrick Hill [email protected] (Please e-­‐mail TA for available office hours) Instructor: Heather Reed, Ph.D. Office: 235 Morrill 1 North Office hours: Tuesdays 10:45 – 11:45 Department of Microbiology Email: [email protected] I. ROLE AS A GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE: This course fulfills a General Education requirement in the Biological Sciences (BS) category. The purpose of the General Education requirement is to stretch students’ minds, broaden your experiences, sharpen your critical thinking skills and help you make connections through shared experiences. Consequently, you will be better prepared for college and professional learning, community engagement and informed citizenship in a diverse and rapidly changing world. II. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will explore how Cancer and AIDS begin and progress. We will discuss the roles of individual cells, gene mutations, and the immune system in cancer development. In addition, we will explore how various physical, genetic and environmental factors influence one's chances of getting cancer. The class will cover specific cancers, treatment strategies, and how lifestyle affects cancer risks and survival. We will also cover HIV biology, transmission, prevention strategies, treatment, principles of vaccine development and why HIV presents special challenges for vaccinologists. Overall, the intention is to explore what cancer and AIDS can teach us about human nature, health, healing, disease, living, and dying. Students are expected to possess the initiative to read, review, dialogue and study material presented in the course. Your understanding of the course material will be assessed through 3 in class exams, assignments and an optional final exam. III. RATIONALE: A well-­‐educated person in the 21st century should have knowledge of the biological sciences and the theories that explain the great complexity of the human body and the diversity of the natural environment. Specifically, a college graduate should have a basic understanding of the biological processes involved in disease development and progression, treatment options and our role in disease prevention through proper nutrition and lifestyle changes. Cancer and AIDS are two of the most important diseases of the 21st century, affecting millions of people each year. Approximately 1.7 million Americans will be newly diagnosed with cancer this year and cancer accounts for 1 of every 4 deaths in the US. Over 38 million people worldwide are currently living with HIV/AIDS, every 16 seconds someone contracts HIV/AIDS and every 12 seconds someone dies of AIDS. Therefore future leaders must fully understand the scientific, social and political issues associated with these diseases. IV. RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS 1. Principles of Cancer Biology (UMass Custom Edition) by Lewis J. Kleinsmith, 2008 2. The Biology of AIDS, 2nd Ed. by Wilmore Webley, 2009 – You may purchase this from the publisher -­‐aids Page 1 of 4 University of Massachusetts Amherst V. COURSE POLICY EXAMS: There will be three exams during class time as indicated in the schedule. The Final Comprehensive Exam is optional, unless you have missed an exam. Any student who misses one of the three class exams must take the final exam. There are no makeup exams in this class. If you take all three in class exams and the final, your lowest grade will be dropped and the average of your three best exam grades will be used to determine your course grade. If you only take three exams no exam grade will be dropped. Make-­‐up due to official University travel-­‐ You may only request a make-­‐up exam if you will be away on official University business, e.g., an athletic competition or academic conference. To support your make-­‐up request, attach written explanation by the relevant campus official for the necessity of your absence. Make-­‐ up exams must be scheduled prior to absence. Make-­‐up due to religious observance-­‐ If you are going to miss an exam due to religious observance you must notify me in writing at the beginning of the semester. You can either give me a list of dates during class or email me a list. Make-­‐up exams must be scheduled prior to absence. Make-­‐up for medical reasons-­‐ In case of a medical emergency, submit a statement from a medical professional that includes a phone number where the professional may be contacted. While it is your right not to disclose any details, the medical professional’s statement must indicate that you were unable for medical reasons to take the scheduled exam. Please note your instructor may refuse your request if advance notice is possible and not given. VI. GRADING Exams will account for 60% of your final grade in this class. You will receive a letter grade of “F” for any instance of exchanging information during an exam or any act of cheating. Assignments will account for the remaining 40% of your grade. As such, you MUST keep up with assignments to avoid performing poorly in this class. This course is a 4-­‐credit course only because of these assignments. Please see the TA or me if you feel you are getting behind in your assignments, but do not wait until the end of the semester or you may end up with a failing grade. Assignments are listed below. Weekly ‘Check-­‐In’: The average of these short sets of multiple choice questions will account for 10% of your final grade. Weekly check-­‐ins will be posted in Moodle at the end of each week. These will be sets of around 5 multiple choice questions that should be similar to exam questions and should act to test your knowledge regarding the material from that week. View and Stew – Short Answer Assignments: The average for the View and Stew will be worth a total of 5% of your grade. These assignments consist of 3 different sets of short answer questions accompanying different segments of the documentary, ‘Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies’. The goal of these assignments is to engage with aspects of cancer that may not be covered in lecture, both in terms of biological concepts and, just as importantly, the human experience of cancer. Page 2 of 4 University of Massachusetts Amherst “Let Me Answer Your Question” (LMAYQ): Two written assignments comprise a set called “Let Me Answer Your Question” (LMAYQ). The LMAYQ assignments are graded individually. The two LMAYQ’s combined are valued at 5% of your final grade. Plagiarism of any type will NOT be tolerated. “Now I Can Relate” (NICR): “Now I Can Relate” or (NICR) is another written assignment worth 10% of your grade. You will have the option to choose between two formats for this assignments an informational report about the ‘typical’ experience of a certain type of cancer or an informative but fictionalized narrative of someone’s experience with a particular type of cancer. Journal Assignment: The “Experience of an HIV/AIDS Patient” assignment requires you to keep a journal for seven days as an HIV patient. This assignment is worth 5% of your grade. Description and rubric for this assignment will be posted. HIV Life Cycle Storyboard: A set of labeled drawings with captions in the form of a Grade Scale storyboard describing the life cycle of HIV is worth 5% of your grade. The goal of A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐93-­‐100 assignment is to provide a means to intimately understand the essential steps of HIV A-­‐ -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐89-­‐92 infection and reproduction within the host cell, a fundamental component of B+ -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐86-­‐88 understanding HIV progression to AIDS and HIV treatments. A description and rubric B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐82-­‐85 for this assignment will be posted on Moodle. B-­‐ -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐79-­‐81 C+ -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐76-­‐78 Details of these assignments and due dates will be announced in class and posted well C -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐73-­‐75 C-­‐ -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐70-­‐72 in advance on MOODLE. It is your responsibility to check the Moodle site to see if the D+-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐65-­‐69 assignments have been made available. D-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐60-­‐64 F -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐Below 60 Your final letter grade will be based on the grade scale in the table. ATTENDANCE and PARTICIPATION: Students are strongly encouraged to attend all lectures, review and discussion sessions; however attendance will not be recorded. Students should review the lecture slides and assigned reading before the scheduled lecture and be prepared to participate in classroom discussions or answer questions when called upon. CLASS COMMUNICATION: All class-­‐related communication will be first and foremost through announcements in class. An essential component of class communication is the Moodle course site. This includes emails, grades, answer keys, PDF copies of lecture slides, announcements and reading assignments. You will need an OIT account to log into Moodle. CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR: For some this course may be a strictly informational (hopefully engaging) class and for others at different times this course can touch upon very personal and sensitive issues. Please approach all forms of communication within this course with respect and sensitivity to others. Disruptive and disrespectful behavior will not be tolerated. Students who participate in any behavior deemed by the instructor to impede the teaching and learning dynamic might be asked to leave the lecture hall to preserve a respectful environment for the class at large. ACCOMODATIONS: Please see or email me if you require special accommodations due to learning disabilities, religious practices, physical requirements, medical needs, or any other reasons. Students with disabilities who Page 3 of 4 University of Massachusetts Amherst will require special assistance should register with Disability Services. You can find more information at . PLAGIARISM: The University of Massachusetts has a strict academic honesty policy including a plagiarism policy (please visit ). The University has a great compilation of resources on how to avoid plagiarism and you should take some time to review these. Any indication or instance of plagiarism will be investigated and students will receive a grade of zero for a first clear offense. A second offense will be reported to the Academic Honesty Board and a hearing will be held to determine a final action. Of course the goal is to avoid this process. Please read the University’s policy on Avoiding Plagiarism and Academic Honesty Policy. The TA and instructor are always willing to help you avoid these problems in the first place. Your first offence will earn you a zero on the assignment. Any further instances of plagiarism will result in the filing of an Informal Resolution with the Academic Honesty Board. The following website provides details on Academic Honesty: Page 4 of 4 ...
View Full Document

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture