Lecture 5 - Force & Motion: Newton's Laws (1st Law) If...

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Department of Physics PHY 2048 Chapter 5.1 Force & Motion: Newton’s Laws Zero net force implies zero acceleration. (1 st Law) If no net force acts on a body then the body’s velocity cannot change. The mass of an object determines how difficult it is to change the objects velocity. Mass has nothing to do with size! Force is measured from the acceleration it produces. If the velocity of an object changes (either in magnitude or direction), then it was acted upon by a net external force in the direction of the acceleration. a m dt v d m F F all i i net r r r r = = = = 1 In the SI system force is measured in Newtons, N, where 1 N = 1 kg · m/s 2 . Example: If a force of 1 N is applied to a particle with a mass of 1 kg, what is its acceleration? If the same force is applied to a particle with a mass of 2 kg, what is its acceleration? Inertial mass! (2 nd Law) The net force on a body is equal to its mass times its acceleration. v F
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Department of Physics PHY 2048 Chapter 5.2 Force & Motion: Inertial Frame Galilean Transformation: Consider two frames of reference the O- frame and the O'-frame moving at a constant velocity V, with respect to each other at let the origins coincide at t= t' = 0. An inertial frame of reference is one that is traveling at a constant velocity ( i.e. non-accelerating). Newton’s laws are only valid in inertial frames of reference. z z y y Vt x x t t = = + = = The Relativity Principle: (a) The basic laws of physics are identical in all systems of reference (frames)
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Lecture 5 - Force & Motion: Newton's Laws (1st Law) If...

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