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Chapter 3 Notes: The Microcultural Context I. Microcultural Group Status A. Social scientists generally recognize five characteristics that distinguish micro- cultural groups from the dominant culture. 1. Physical or cultural traits (e.g., dress habits, race, sex). 2. Involuntary membership (members are born into the group). 3. Endogamy (i.e., marrying within the ingroup). 4. Members are aware of their subordinate status. 5. Unequal treatment from the dominant group (e.g., segregation and discrimination). II. Muted Microcultural Groups A. The experiences and perceptions of subordinate microcultural groups are often different than those of the dominant cultural group. Microcultural groups often times are not as free or as capable as the dominant cultural group to communicate as freely as the dominant group. B. The language of the dominant group may not provide the words and symbols representative of the microcultural group's perceptions and experiences. Thus, because such groups are forced to communicate (e.g., speak, write) within the dominant mode of expression, they become muted . C. The manifestations of the Muted Group Theory are that microcultural groups' speech and writing are not valued by the dominant cultural group. Moreover, microcultural groups experience difficulty expressing themselves fluently within the dominant mode of expression and micro-macro interaction is difficult. D. Microcultural groups may respond to the dominant mode of expression in two ways. Some will refuse to live by the standards set forth by the dominant group and will try to change the dominant mode of expression. Another way subordinate groups respond is by using their own private language. They create symbols that are not understood or used by the dominant group. They use their own language in order to express their unique experiences (e.g., ebonics, spanglish) III. Microcultures in the United States A. Many microcultures exist in the Untied States. The formation of microcultural groups is often the result of immigration, annexation, or colonization. This chapter explores six microcultural groups, with particular attention to the communication and how it differs from the dominant macroculture. The six microculutral groups to be discussed are Hispanics/Latinos, African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Amish, Hmong, and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered (LGBT). IV. Hispanics/Latinos A. Hispanics/Latinos are the largest microcultural group in the United States. According to the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau, just over 50 million people about 16% of the U.S. population are of Hispanic or Latino origin. The Hispanic population increased by more than 15 million people between the years 2000 and 2010, accounting for more than half the increase in the total population of the United States during that decade. Moreover, between 2000 and 2010, the Hispanic population grew by 43% 4 times the growth in the total population, which hovered at about 10%.
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  • Spring '14
  • RoxanneDeLille
  • The Bible, Native Americans in the United States

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