First North American primate trekked from Siberia

First North - First North American primate trekked from Siberia By Will DunhamMon Mar 3 6:36 PM ET This artist's sketch shows how the ancient

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First North American primate trekked from Siberia By Will Dunham Mon Mar 3, 6:36 PM ET This artist's sketch shows how the ancient, primitive primate called Teilhardina magnoliana may have looked. ... He was the Albert Einstein of his time -- aside from the fact that this long-extinct critter weighed about an ounce (28 grams), measured three inches long and munched on bugs and berries. A U.S. scientist has unearthed the remains of the earliest-known primate to live in North America. In doing so, he figured out the path these ancient representatives of the mammalian group that includes lemurs, monkeys, apes and people must have taken to reach this part of the world. Based on a group of teeth from a teeny primate unearthed in Mississippi dating to 55.8 million years ago, paleontologist Christopher Beard of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh said the species likely scampered over a now-vanished land bridge connecting Siberia to Alaska. The tiny immigrant was called Teilhardina magnoliana, Beard said in the Proceedings of
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This note was uploaded on 04/29/2008 for the course CELL 101 taught by Professor Burdsal during the Spring '08 term at Tulane.

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First North - First North American primate trekked from Siberia By Will DunhamMon Mar 3 6:36 PM ET This artist's sketch shows how the ancient

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