lab 5 - The Moon - Phases and Eclipses Laboratory 5 Moon...

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The Moon - Phases and Eclipses Laboratory 5 Moon Phases Objective: In this laboratory study the phases of the moon will be discussed as well as how to determine if the conditions are right for a solar eclipse or a lunar eclipse to occur. Fraction of illumination will aid in this determination. The SC001 Constellation Chart will be used to plot two lunar cycles. Background: The four main phases of the Moon are New Moon (NM), First Quarter (FQ), Full Moon (FM), and Last Quarter (LQ). Each phase of the Moon rises and sets at the same time each month. The approximate times are as follows: NM– rises around 6am, sets around 6pm FQ – rises around 12pm (noon), sets around 12am (midnight) FM – rises around 6pm, sets around 6am LQ – rises around 12am, sets around 12pm The moon sets approximately 50 minutes later each night. Fraction of Illumination The fraction of the Moon that we see from Earth is called the fraction of illumination, sometimes noted as a percentage. The fraction of illumination for the phases of the Moon is as follows: Phase Fraction of Illumination New Moon 0.00 or 0% Waxing Crescent 0.25 or 25% First Quarter 0.50 or 50% Waxing Gibbous 0.75 or 75% Full Moon 1.00 or 100% Waning Gibbous 0.75 or 75% Last Quarter 0.50 or 50% Waning Crescent 0.25 or 25% Each phase lasts approximately 3 – 4 days and the moons cycle is approximately 29.5 days. 1
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The orbit of the moon is not circular and because of that it will reach a point where it will be closest to the Earth and a point at which it will be farthest from Earth. Apogee , refers to when the Moon is farthest from the Earth and Perigee is when the Moon is closest to the Earth Eclipses The Moon orbits the Earth at a 5.2° tilt with respect to the ecliptic. For an eclipse to occur the Moon’s orbit must cross the ecliptic, which it does twice a month. However the phase of the Moon must be full or new as it crosses the ecliptic for an eclipse to occur. For a solar eclipse to occur the phase of the Moon must be a New Moon and for a lunar eclipse to occur the phase of the Moon must be a Full Moon. Lunar Eclipse
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2008 for the course ASTR 154L taught by Professor Akca during the Spring '08 term at CSU Northridge.

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lab 5 - The Moon - Phases and Eclipses Laboratory 5 Moon...

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