lab 3 - Learning the Sky 6 Software Laboratory 3 Objective:...

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Learning the Sky 6 Software Laboratory 3 Objective: In this laboratory The Sky 6 software is introduced and will be used for some of the later activities in this class. It serves both as a tutorial for the software and as an introduction to identifying stars, constellations, and planets in the Northern hemisphere using both the Equatorial and Horizon coordinate systems. Part 1: The Basics 1. Click on The Sky 6 icon located on the desktop. This opens the software (Figure 1). Figure 1 2 . The Sky 6 automatically defaults to March 11, 2005 at Noon, facing south at latitude 34º N, longitude 118º W (Los Angeles). To change the date click Data on the toolbar (Figure 2) and in the dropdown window that now appears select Time. This opens a small window (Figure 3), with a clock in it. Change the date from ‘Mar 11 2005’, to _____________by clicking on the Month, Day, and Year. Close the Time window when finished . Figure 2 1
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Figure 3 There are several View Controllers , located on the toolbar , that need to be examined. These controllers aid the user in locating various objects in the sky. 3. Viewing stars during daytime : By clicking on the icon the screen changes from ‘day- sky’ to ‘night-sky’ with out changing the time. Stars cannot be viewed during daytime because of the brightness of the Sun, however they are still present. Click on this icon and let it remain this way. 4 . Green arrows : These arrows simulate the turning of a person’s head looking up, down, left or right. Try the controllers: look up, down, left and finally look right to return to the original direction, which was straight forward. 5. , N, S E, and W: These controllers change the direction the user is looking in terms of viewing North ( N ), South ( S ), East ( E ), and West (W), or laying on the ground looking straight up ( ). Try the controllers and then return to the starting point, which is south. 6 . Return to daylight view by clicking the appropriate icon. 2
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Part 2: Getting Information We will now move through a series of instructions by continuing to use the view controls on the toolbar, but also investigating what the right and left mouse buttons do. 1 . To center an object on the screen : Place the cursor on the desired object and right click on the mouse. A pop-up menu will appear with several choices. Select center (Figure 4). Try centering the Sun. Figure 4 2 . Object Information Window : Celestial objects have different properties such as location, position, transit time, and distance. To access that information, place the cursor on the object and left click on the mouse. A window will appear with all of the objects properties (Figure 5). 3
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2008 for the course ASTR 154L taught by Professor Akca during the Spring '08 term at CSU Northridge.

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lab 3 - Learning the Sky 6 Software Laboratory 3 Objective:...

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