lab 2 - Using the Star Wheel Laboratory 2 Objective: This...

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Using the Star Wheel Laboratory 2 Objective: This laboratory introduces the Star Wheel; which is a common tool used in backyard observing. This tool helps approximate the location of constellations and certain stars as they move across the sky during a single night (this is called “daily motion). In addition, it is possible to approximate the time that a star will rise and set, as well as when the best time to observe it will be. Background: Constellations Gazing at the night sky on a dark clear night we can see several thousand stars scattered in random patterns or groups. These groups have been noticed and are called constellations . To ancient sky gazers a constellation was a loose group of stars that represented a certain figure or pattern. They gave these star patterns names after their heroes (such as Orion, Hercules, Cassiopeia…); other constellation names cam from animals (Taurus, Leo…). Almost half of all today’s known constellations were invented in ancient times. More recently 40 new constellations have been added by astronomers to
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This note was uploaded on 04/28/2008 for the course ASTR 154L taught by Professor Akca during the Spring '08 term at CSU Northridge.

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lab 2 - Using the Star Wheel Laboratory 2 Objective: This...

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