Shedding new light on cancer risk

Shedding new light on cancer risk - Select the Print...

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Select the Print command in your browser to print this page Citation information: Page accessed: Tuesday, January 15, 2008 Page URL: http://cmsprod1.tcs.tulane.edu/news/newwave/011508_cancer.cfm subscribe web version Shedding New Light on Cancer Risk January 15, 2008 Melanie Cross newwave@tulane.edu To avoid cancer, don't smoke, don't sunbathe, and don't work the night shift? When the World Health Organization added nightshift work to its list of probable cancer-causing agents last month, Steven Hill at the Tulane School of Medicine wasn't surprised. His laboratory has explored the connection between cancer and exposure to light since the early 1980s. Cancer research Steven Hill has studied the effects of light and darkness on cancer risk for decades. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano)
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Hill, chair of Tulane's Structural and Cellular Biology Department , examines the anti- tumor activities of the hormone melatonin, which is produced by the body in response to darkness. In the early 1980s, Hill as a graduate student was the first to demonstrate that
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