Diabetic PP Presentation - Type II Diabetes Meal...

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Type II Diabetes Meal Preparation for Those Suffering with Type II Diabetes By: Kerry Garland
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Inspired After my dad had a routine check up at the Veterans Affairs Hospital (VA), he was told that he was pre-diabetic. I have always tried to tell my dad to cut back on the Mt. Dew, the donuts and pastries. But the interesting thing is my dad is not heavy set, over weight. He is within a healthy weight range. I began to be increasingly interested in this because the vast majority of Americans who suffer from Type II Diabetes are overweight or obese. My goal is to learn more about this particular disease and how to help others prevent their own diagnosis.
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Understanding Diabetes Maintaining normal ranges of blood glucose is extremely important. This balance depends on two different processes. The first process is when blood glucose falls to low, food then can replenish these levels. However, in absence of food, glucagon can signal to the liver to begin breaking down glycogen storages. The second is when blood glucose rises to high. Insulin then begins to signal to cells that take in glucose for energy. Eating a healthy diet helps the body maintain balance between both extremes. (Sizer, Whitney) In diabetes, blood glucose remains high after a meal because insulin is either inadequate or ineffective. Thus, while blood glucose is central to diabetes, dietary carbohydrates does not cause diabetes. (Whitney, Cataldo, Rolfes & Wardlaw, Smith)
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Type I & II Diabetes Type I diabetes is genetic, occurring when the pancreas fails to make insulin. This is a less common type and can be linked to immune disorders, toxin and viral infections. (Wardlaw, Smith) Type II diabetes is not genetic, although obesity factors that result in this type of diabetes may be genetic. This type of diabetes occurs when the blood cells fail to respond to insulin, or the pancreas does not make sufficient amounts of insulin due to obesity. This type of diabetes is very common and a major health concern for many Americans. (Whitney, Cataldo, Rolfes)
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Hypoglycemia When healthy people consume their meals, blood glucose rises after eating and then eventually falls to normal ranges (usually during digestion). When people have hypoglycemia, their blood glucose levels drops significantly, this is usually a result of those who poorly manage their diabetes. Symptoms of hypoglycemia are: weakness, poor vision, rapid heart beat, sweating, anxiety, hunger, muscle fatigue and spasms Someone who suffers from hypoglycemia should consume consistent amounts of carbohydrates throughout the day (Whitney, Cataldo, Rolfes)
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The Glycemic Effect The term glycemic effect, relates to hypoglycemia and its connection with the way our bodies blood cells respond to glucose.
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