chapter 3 - Nuclide Symbol of Atom A Z X Where X is the...

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McGlone 1 The Social Aspects of the Great Depression Leighann McGlone Dr. John Sheehan December 10, 2007
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McGlone 2 The Great Depression was the worst economic collapse in the history of the United States. Lasting from 1929 until 1940 people lost their savings, jobs, homes, and lifestyles. Millions of people relied on charity and faced the difficulties of living in poverty. With economic struggles came a diverse array of social conflicts that arose during and after the Depression. “The Depression was an instructive experience which produced novel social adaptations” (Elder, 3). The effects of unemployment and deprivation on workers and their families was a defining component in the social aspects of the Great Depression.   Although the depression “shared the basic characteristics of other such crises, the Great Depression was unprecedented in its length and in the wholesale of poverty and tragedy it inflicted on society” (Great Depression). The depression was caused by many weaknesses in the economy. Income was unevenly distributed, and many Americans bought on margin or credit- spending more than they earned. Most closely related to the depression was the stock market crash or Black Tuesday on October 29, 1929, which cleaned out thousands of shareholders and damaged the financial systems in the United States and abroad. Lasting right through the 1930s, the depression ended in the United States only with the culmination of, and substantial spending
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McGlone 3 for World War II, and Roosevelt’s New Deal Programs. Beyond the economic downfalls and political reactions many Americans faced desolation and experienced social ruin. After the Crash of 1929, life itself changed for many Americans. “The most striking characteristic of the Depression was the severity and duration of unemployment” As many as 15 million people (1 in 4 workers) were unemployed from 1933 until 1940 (Carnes 182). High numbers of unemployment made it difficult to raise a family. Many people lost their homes, possessions and dignity. Millions of people depended on charity, soup kitchens, or homemade bread and produce to provide enough food to survive from day to day. “Inadequate nutrition brought a rash of childhood ailments, such as rickets, pellagra, gum inflammation, and tooth decay. And countless went hungry (Carroll 496). People were hungry, jobs were few, and America was facing crisis. Children faced many hardships growing up in poverty. Pasquale Viglucci described how growing up in an immigrant family took its toll on his lifestyle. Life and employment was especially difficult for his father, because he spoke minimal English. Therefore, he and his siblings had to leave school and he never completed the fourth grade. “Two out of my three brothers never learned to read or write” (Viglucci). He and his brothers performed physical labor- sometimes for twelve to thirteen hours a day for mere pennies to help their family survive. His sisters would knit scarves and gloves to sell, and he and his brother found ways to steal bread
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chapter 3 - Nuclide Symbol of Atom A Z X Where X is the...

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