Pulp Fiction DONE

Pulp Fiction DONE - Francesco Mercuri December 4 2008 Ways...

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Francesco Mercuri December 4, 2008 Ways of Writing In The Film Club, David Gilmour uses the terminology “fun writing” and “true writing” when talking about Pulp Fiction (1994) in his book. My definition of “fun writing” is a movie written purely for the entertainment of the audience. “True writing” is a film that speaks honestly and usually has a meaning or message to convey to an audience. Pulp Fiction is written purely for entertainment, and is not true writing. Fun writing in movies such as Pulp Fiction , do not connect to the audience as much as movies of true writing would. Watching Pulp Fiction , I felt emotionally distanced from the movie. The movie jumped from one story to another in a discontinuous fashion. For example, Butch, played by Bruce Willis, is in his apartment, and Vincent, played by John Travolta, comes out of the bathroom and is immediately shot to death by Butch. Then, a few minutes later the movie jumps to another story, and Vincent is still alive. He stays alive for the rest of the movie; however, if the movie were put in chronological order, he would be dead. I can see why Quentin Tarantino kept Travolta alive. He is such a movie icon that audience members already have strong emotional attachment to him; and to see him die, would break anyone’s heart. But, if one
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Pulp Fiction DONE - Francesco Mercuri December 4 2008 Ways...

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