NBA_515_Managing_Change_Presentation

NBA_515_Managing_Change_Presentation - Managing Change...

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Managing Change
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2 10/05/09 Cognitive Psychology (How individuals respond to change) Leading Thinker - Daryl Connor Cognitive Psychology (How individuals respond to change) Leading Thinker - Daryl Connor Social Psychology ( compliance of change) Leading Thinker - John Kotter Change Management
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3 10/05/09 Change and Control At the heart of understanding how people react to change is the issue of control. Humans have evolved to being the most control-oriented animals on the planet. People are most comfortable when they can influence what happens to them. The ability to influence is largely dependent on being prepared for what will happen. Preparedness is, to a great extent, contingent on establishing accurate expectations about the future. Source: ODR
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4 10/05/09 Control Needs: Summary People have a strong need for control This need can be met by dictating or at least anticipating their future Specific expectations are established based on what can be dictated or anticipated When perceived reality does not match expectations, the feeling of control is lost and people must adjust to the changes they were unprepared to face When perceived reality matches expectations, a sense of control is achieved and a form of equilibrium is generated Source: ODR
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5 10/05/09 Positive Response to Change II. Informed Pessimism I. Uninformed Optimism Checking Out III. Hopeful Realism (Hope) IV. Informed Optimism (Confidence) V. Completion (Satisfaction) TIME PESSIMISIM Source: ODR
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6 10/05/09 The Increasing Impact of Change Key Characteristics of Turbulent Work Environments More interactive components (e.g., people, tasks, issues, problems, opportunities) More interdependence among the components More unanticipated consequences Less time to react to events Less predictability and control Less durability of solutions The Combined Effect Produces A Highly Turbulent Work Environment 1990s Time 2000+ Acceleration Volume Momentum Complexity Source: ODR
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10/05/09 Assimilation of Change “Assimilating change” means recovering from a significant disruption in expectations. This is accomplished when new expectations are developed that allow direct or indirect control to be reestablished. There are no safe havens with this definition. We must assimilate change regardless of whether it is perceived to have a positive or negative impact on our lives and regardless of whether we are responding to an outside force for change or if we initiated it ourselves. People have their own unique capacity for change that is symbolized by the number of “assimilation points” they have available for adjusting to change. The more assimilation points, the faster and more effectively a person can recover
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2009 for the course NBA 5150 taught by Professor Hostetler,michael during the Spring '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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NBA_515_Managing_Change_Presentation - Managing Change...

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