PHIL 101 - first essay_Essay

PHIL 101 - first essay_Essay - 3/31/2006 Philosophy 101...

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3/31/2006 Philosophy 101 – Essay 1 Consider the following argument: 1 1. An all-powerful, all-knowing all-good being would prevent any harm if doing so would not bring about a greater harm or prevent a greater good. 2 2. Preventing all murders would not bring about a greater harm. 3 3. Preventing all murders would not prevent a greater good. 4 4. So, an all-powerful, all-knowing all-good being would prevent all murders. Plantinga, who writes on issues regarding the above, goes through a series of examples and steps in order to show that the existence of evil does not disprove the existence of G-d. Moreover, Plantinga states that there is a necessary existence of evil in the world. Since G-d wanted beings in the world to have free will, it was a must to allow for some evil to exist. In the views of the creator, it is less evil to allow for free will and whatever evil accompanies free actions, than to restrict freedoms yielding un-free automata, a greater evil. In essence the lesser of two evils was chosen, and so the existence of all evil is based upon the existence of a good. Furthermore, an evil can only be eliminated if the result is a lesser degree in evil, and the same or greater degree of good. Many philosophers believe that since evil exists in this world, G-d must not exist. This is because the general view is that G-d is an all powerful, all good, omniscient, moral being. If such characteristics are in fact true, then why would G-d create a world within which there is a presence of evil? Plantinga’s retort to this objection involves an argument claiming that the characteristics assigned to G-d are maintained, but since G-d is acting for the greatest good of the beings in this world, it is necessary to allow for the incidence of evil. 1 of 5
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In effect, evil is allowed in order to provide for a greater good, or at least the better ratio of good to evil. Again, there were two basic options for the premises of this world, and weighed against one another, the lesser evil was selected, as G-d is keeping the best interest of this world’s beings in mind. The first option would be the obvious move of preventing all evil merely by programming, in a sense, all beings, as to not act in ways that would bring about evil. Unfortunately, this initial and apparent attempt to provide for a world without evil through a
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This essay was uploaded on 02/20/2009 for the course PHIL 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Cornell.

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PHIL 101 - first essay_Essay - 3/31/2006 Philosophy 101...

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