PHIL 101 - fourth exercise_Essay

PHIL 101 - fourth exercise_Essay - 3/13/2006 Philosophy 101...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
3/13/2006 Philosophy 101 - Exercise 4 Descartes believes that he can be deceived about what he is seeing. This is the case because what one sees is a composition of all of its perceived properties. We are observing the features of an object, never just the object itself. As a result of this, one can merely see what one’s mind processes as being there. Descartes uses wax as an example. One sees the apparent characteristics of wax, but needs to infer based on these traits, what the actual wax looks like. There is never a way of viewing the actual wax in a definitive way. Furthermore, there are many factors that influence how one perceives the wax in the first place. If it is placed within a well lit area it is perceived in one way, and yet if that same wax is viewed under less light, it can be perceived in a completely different fashion. Descartes also believes that he can be deceived about what he is thinking. This is the case because what one thinks is based upon observations and then subsequent processing. Depending
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This essay was uploaded on 02/20/2009 for the course PHIL 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

Page1 / 2

PHIL 101 - fourth exercise_Essay - 3/13/2006 Philosophy 101...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online