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Horse transportation_Final_Presentation

Horse transportation_Final_Presentation - Horse...

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Animal Welfare, Fall 2008 Horse Transportation: the physiological, physical, and behavioral effects of road transport and trailer design as it contributes to stocking density
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A little background on horse  transport The Evolution of… Horses have been transported by boats for at least 3,500 years  Transport by rail was very common during the middle to late  1800s  Transport by trucks after World War II following the building  of the interstate highway system and the development of more  reliable trucks and trailers.  The 1960s and 1970s became known as the “trailer age” for  horse transport  The 1980s and 1990s are sometimes referred to as the “air  age” of horse transport due to the frequent use of large cargo  aircraft. Horses tend to travel longer distances to slaughter than other  livestock because of the limited equine slaughterhouses.
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What’s going on in the 2000s? What  age are we in? There are an estimated 6.9 million horses in the  United States, and their owners spend an  estimated $2.17 billion per year transporting those  horses 72,120 horses transported to slaughter in 1998  Continuous transport of slaughter horses for 30  hours is common  Some trips last 36 hours or longer  Public concern over the transport of horses going  to slaughter was the driving force behind the Safe  Commercial Transportation of Equine to Slaughter  Act (§ 901–905) that was passed as part of the  1996 U.S. Farm Bill.
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What are the issues? 1) Stress: weight loss and dehydration common  results of transit-induced stress 2) Orientation: high rate of impacts with stall  and vehicle sides depending on orientation? 3) Density: trailer design allowing for higher or  lower number of animals in transport unit 4) Others: Temperature, food, water? Driver’s  knowledge? Ventilation and disease?
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4) Others?
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