The European Gypsy Moth was first observed on the shores of North America in 1870 on the East Coas

The European Gypsy Moth was first observed on the shores of North America in 1870 on the East Coas

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Peter Schnelle A40321951 ISB 201L Invasive species are becoming a larger and larger part of our day to day lives, with creatures such as the Zebra Mussel, Emerald Ash Borer, Gypsy Moth and many others out-competing their native counterparts. The Gypsy Moth is no newcomer to the arena, as it was introduced over 130 years ago. It has been the center of many efforts to help restore our forests. Many of these control methods are questionable in both their effectiveness, and whether or not they do more harm than good. The European Gypsy Moth Lymantria dispar was first observed on the shores of North America in 1870 on the East Coast and was observed to be spreading with “great rapidity”. The first appearance of the Gypsy Moth in Michigan was in 1957. One of the first methods used to control the Gypsy Moth was aerial spraying, which did help ebb the spread of the Gypsy moth, where it is now confined to one area in central Michigan, a small part of Wisconsin and the Northern half of the Eastern Seaboard. (Sapio) Over the past 130 years the Gypsy Moth has more or less pushed its way into the ecological makeup of the Northern United States and Southern Canada. Control Efforts include using chemical pesticides, hormone traps and introducing and increasing predator species of the moth. Lymantria dispar starts its life as an egg bundled up with its hundreds of brothers and sisters. The specific hatching time is dependent on the speed at which the weather warms. Usually the hatching time is not too long after the Oak trees start to leaf out. When the egg hatches, out comes a larva that is “dark with sparse, stiff hairs and a pattern of red and blue dorsal spots”. (Naturserve) The larva then gets to work eating
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Peter Schnelle A40321951 ISB 201L the leaves of many different types of trees and shrubs, with a strong preference to trees
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2009 for the course ISB 201L taught by Professor Fritz during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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The European Gypsy Moth was first observed on the shores of North America in 1870 on the East Coas

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